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Accession No, 



20067 7-22 5M 



2007 05fl31b5 5 

California Stale Library 



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PRICE 10 CENTS 




California Adverti^^ 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



SAN FRANCISCO 



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SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1923 



LOS ANGEL 




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One Hundred and Eleventh Half Yearly Report 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868 





COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 



Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds (total 

value $26,111,876.00) standing on books at $24,207. 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first niortgayts 53,112 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,231 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco 109 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and iranch offices (value $1,350,000.00), 

standing on books at 

Other Real Estate (value $60,000.00), standing on books al 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $414,917.52) standing on books at 

Cash on hand and in Federal Reserve Bank 7,593, 



011.73 
765.12 
283.16 
500.00 



1.00 

1.00 

122.27 



Total $86,255,685.28 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $82,455,685.28 

Capital Stock netuallv paid up 1,000.000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 



Total $86,255,685.28 

GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 30th day of June, 1923. 

[SEAL] ("HAS. F. DUISENBERG, Notary Public 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4M) percent per 

annum was declared, Interest compounded QUARTERLY 

instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore 



Deposits made on or before July 10th. 1923, will earn interest from July 1st, 1923. 



^VVVXVNXNNVVVNNNNNVVXXNNXNXVVVVNNVVVXVVVVX^ 



mm 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



Fidelity and 

.*• •JStntety 
• Burglary 
Automobile 
Insurance 



WALTER W. DERR 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Highland Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (43-j.) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Reserve Now Your Bonds 

For Reinvestment of July Funds 

You may choose your investment and 
make your reservation with us now 
for the day on which your funds are 
ready. 
Let Us Send You Our List for July Investment 



Not one day's interest need be lost in 
reinvestment or purchasing securities 
with money that is soon available. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



San Francisco 
Sansome Street 



Oakland 

709 Syndicate 

Bldg. 



Los Angeles 

203 Baltlett 

Bldg. 



New York 
2 Wall Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital (15.000,000 115,000.000 Eeitrre Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 

g>an JFnutriara (ttljnmtrle 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month — 

including Sunday editions 

Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



—NOTICE— 

Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Montgomery St., between 
Suiter and Bush Six. 

Special Dinner on 

Sundays. $1.00 

P i excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining; Room 
Prices Reasonable 

You ore hound to he pleuseil when you 
eat lit THE CLUB i.Kll.l. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 7Sc 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1 .75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 




69190 



Established July 20. 1656 




TEB 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 7, 1923 



No. 1 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C. England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— The cleverest woman in England is an American. 

— We notice the name of John P. Irish appearing again in the 
newspapers. We thought he had been gathered to his fathers long 
ago; or is this his second incarnation? 

— "The wisest plans fail when statesmen of an hour deal with 
national feeling bred through centuries." Arthur Brisbane has said 
something in this that the world-court enthusiasts should ponder 

upon. 

* * * 

— Exciting race to American shores of alien hordes! On July 
1st became effective the 3 per cent proportion of each nationality 
to be allowed to emigrate to the land of the free. It is just 3 per 
cent too much. 

— There are crowds of strangers in town; many of them small 
town Easterners and Middle Westerners. We can tell the women 
by their thin lips and a sort of a hungry look around the back of 
their ears, if you know what we mean. Still, they all have a "homey" 
air about them; or do we mean "homely?" 

* * * 

— "Mrs. Harding is ruining dozens of pairs of gloves greeting 
artisans" in the Presidential cross country march. "Artisans" should 
keep their hands clean, or Mrs. Harding should greet them with 
bare fingers. Possibly, though, she has taken her cue from her hus- 
band just now, and is handling the labor question with gloves. 

— When the educational world takes up the matter of "no more 
war," we see a faint glimmering of hope ahead. Cut out the bom- 
bastic teaching of patriotism in the schools; the "my country can 
lick anything" sentiment among the young and impressionable all 
over the world, and the greatest work will be done in the name ot 

peace. 

* * * 

— Sir William Orpen, famous portrait painter, holds the auto- 
mobile responsible for the lack of beauty in modern feminine legs, 
which are "undeveloped and skinny." so he says. On the other 
hand, we are of the opinion that golf is the cause of the very 
thick ankles we often see hereabouts on the fair sex. and golf i- 
becoming more and more popular. Custom un-makes in some ways, 
and makes-up in others. 



— In our issue of June 9th we had the temerity to criticise the 

way the local press spelled "bourgeoise" and "bourgeoisie," and then 

alas! our printer left out the "e" after "g" and the joke was on us! 
* * * 

— A funny coincidence: We are told that the company produc- 
ing "The Nth Commandment" offered a prize of $1000 for the 
best name for that play. Six different persons suggested the present 
name, and rather than complicate matters, or appear to be evading 
their promise, the company came through with $1000 for each of 
the prize winners. Do you believe that? 

— A member of Parliament sizes up the Ruhr situation: "France 
is ruining Germany, ruining herself, and ruining Europe. And the 
English-speaking world looks idly on. Trade is being lost, hatred 
and seed of future wars are being sown, just because the French, 
from considerations of national dignity and international prestige, 
refuse to admit the utter failure of their filibustering expedition." 

— In spite of the fact that recent exposures have proved that 
"Communistic" propaganda has incited to riot negro populations 
in various parts of the South, we are apparently extending a wel- 
come to hundreds of destitute Russians. Some of them call them- 
selves "Czarists," (and some of them, of course, claim noble birth), 
but who's to prove their statements? And in the meantime we are 
cluttered up with a lot of the "great un-washed." 

— Dear me, isn't il a pity that cats should always run to long 
tails and that humans should seek to aggrandise themselves! Here 
comes Dr. Hassler. as nice a man as ever gave a pill, and says 
that while other people may be allowed to discuss health matters, 
doctors must of necessity lead such discussions. That is the theo- 
logical point of view which had so many hard knocks in the course 
of the centuries and is utterly untrue. Doctors may accumulate 
facts and state theories, but the race itself seizes upon the con- 
clusions. It is a queer but true thing that mere knowledge in it- 
self does not make leaders, either in medicine or anything else. 

— During the meeting of the physicians much was said about 
heredity and one exponent of the heredity doctrine was so con- 
fident that he declared that there was nothing else to it. Now comes 
Dr. Langer, who presides over the wonderful Jewish Orphans' Home, 
and is just as emphatic contra. Thus he says: "My experience has 
made me very skeptical of inheritance as a determining factor. If 
I were adopting a child I would not hesitate to select the child 
of a man or woman who had been convicted of crime provided that 
the child itself had inherited a blood-stream untainted by disease 
either mental or physical." Of course, we are not scientists and do 
not know enough to pass an opinion. But all the same we do know 
which of the two is the doctrine of hope and we are inclined to 
bank on the hopeful as being more in accord with a nature which 
is continually renewing itself. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 




Statistics are always most illuminating when they 
Infant Mortality are most confusing, which seems paradoxical, but 

is not so. Take the question of infant mortality. 
That is an important matter, for there is great waste connected with 
the untimely and premature death of infants and of course in the 
long run the position of a community depends, so people say, in 
spite of al! the birth control, on the number of thoroughly equipped 
adults which in the last analysis also means on the number of healthy 
children. Now it is surprising to state that we have the largest infant 
mortality rate on the whole Pacific Coast. We have a death rate of 
13.2 per 1000 and Idaho has 8.1 per 1000. Why should that be, 
with our climate and our advanced social hygiene? Washington and 
Oregon are a little higher than Idaho, but quite noticeably lower than 
we are. This curious, and to us, quite unmistakable fact, is hardly 
capable of explanation as far as we are able to see. It can not be 
argued that the population of California is on a lower plane than 
that of Washington and Oregon; indeed, we should be inclined to 
say that the class of people who came here was about the same as 
regards race and condition of social development as those of our two 
more northerly neighbors. What is the reason? 



There is quite a marked development of corn- 
Municipal Camps munity work in the institution of the various 

municipal camps in the high Sierras and else- 
where. Oakland has a very fine camp of that sort, and Berkeley has 
also a municipal camp. Besides there are camps that are run by the 
university and such other communal activities of that sort. This 
is one of the very best products of our recent life, and shows that the 
Californian is taking to nature worship and beginning to get some of 
the emotional and artistic reactions of the unique beauty of our coun- 
try. It is said that the Italian is never at home when he is in the 
house, but is really at home when he is in the public square and is 
altogether more at home when he is in sight of the city hall than 
when he is within the four walls of his own house. That is a testimony 
to the early social life of the Italian which made him a social creature 
for the most part. But suppose we should primarily in the state, 
develop a cult of nature, and that our people should come to be more 
at home among the wonders of the out-of-doors than among the crea- 
tions of human industry? That would be an achievement, and its ef- 
fects upon the art and life of the community would be simply in- 
calculable. At any rate, the municipal camps are unquestionably 
popular and every year accommodate more and more people. It is a 
fine idea. 



There is no doubt at all by this time that there is 
The Ford Boom an underlying desire to have Ford for president, 
for President for the returns of the straw votes which "Colliers" 

has been trying out shows a very marked demand 
and not at all among the low-brows of the community. This is a 
paralyzingly American idea; we mean the idea that a man can be 
president of a great country without any special training in that 
direction, and that a self-confessed ignorance of history is of no im- 
portance. We are not taking any line against Mr. Ford, whom we 
admire with the rest of our countrymen for success well won in the 
face of odds, and for the creation of a huge and magnificently de- 
veloped industry. But are the combined qualities of mechanic and 
financier the qualities which go to establish a man as material for the 



presidential chair? You remember Mr. Wilson said he had to match 
brains with Europe, and so must every president. Is a very high-class 
mechanic, possessed of the sort of brains that can organize and run a 
great industry, necessarily so constituted as to be able to direct the 
destinies of a great republic? One leading politician says: "Henry 
Ford is a big business man and successful. This government is a big 
business." Is that the whole truth? The eligibility of Ford depends 
on the answer. 



The ruin caused by the war spreads and 
The Exodus of spreads. Germany sinks further down all 

British Skilled Workers the time and there does not appear to be 

any sign of real recuperation anywhere in 
Europe. On the contrary the marks of disintegration become more 
and more evident. They are apparent even in England, where the 
conditions have in some respects appeared to improve. But the actual 
state of things is revealed by the colossal and altogether unpre- 
cedented exodus of the skilled workers which form the very backbone 
of England and on which she has to depend to maintain her position 
in the industrial world. This departure from the native land is not to 
the British possessions but towards the United States. That is another 
blow. The quota of immigrants allowed to Great Britain has long 
been exhausted and thousands are waiting for a chance to come here. 
No wonder that the government gets alarmed and calls a special 
meeting to consider the matter. With the loss of good workers a com- 
munity falls and the dry rot which has developed since the war still 
further spreads. We are getting the benefit, and all the steamer book- 
ings till the end of September are full. Whether we can digest this 
accession of skilled men remains to be seen. We have quite enough 
skilled men of our own. We need rough labor. 



It is a sad fact that we are getting into the 
The Circle Narrowing same sort of position with respect to a com- 
ing war as the world occupied during the 
few years preceding the fatal August, 1914. Now as then the ques- 
tions of armament are uppermost, only the feelings are more exacer- 
bated than they were then. The neurosis which has followed on the 
war still continues; people are more suspicious aand what is more to 
the point, very much frightened, and may plunge over out of sheer 
terror as indeed was actually the case in 1914. There are more 
troops under arms in Europe than there were in 1914, more than a 
million in standing armies, to tell the truth, and all that, in spite of 
the fact that Germany has been eliminated as military power and 
the Russian army with the colors greatly reduced in numbers. The 
means of war are, however, infinitely greater in destructive capacity 
than they were before 1914 and such matters as gas-warfare, aerial 
forces, and combined flying and submarine naval weapons engross 
the attention of the experts. The growling has begun, and France 
and England are now engaged in a duel, unseen, but none the less 
real and competitive armaments have already assumed a grave 
aspect. France says her air planes are against Germany with whom 
she is, at least on paper, at peace. England says that hers are 
against no one, but are created for general self-defense. Japan and 
Russia are trying to untie the Saghalien knot without hostilities. As 
for Russia, whatever may be the dominant idea of the government, 
there is no question that the same imperialistic sweep which marked 
its predecessor still continues and the Russian goes further and 
further afield taking up all that the revolution temporarily lost of 
territory and influence in the Orient. Our president is already begin- 
ning to talk of the next war and of levies, not only of men but of 
property, of the wholesale destruction of individual action and mak- 
ing the state as supreme in time of strife. Mr. Harding is too sa- 
gacious to talk about war unless it may be reckoned as at least a 
possibility. The circle narrows and the crisis grows nearer. 



July 7. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



It may come as a sort of surprise to many peo- 
British Workers pie that the British Labor Party, by far the most 
and the Monarchy radical body that ever formed the British parlia- 
mentary opposition, went on record with prac- 
tically no dissenting voice against any attack upon the monarchy 
or the British ruling house. This is rather astonishing to those brought 
up in the republican cult, who fancy that royalty ipso facto is dis- 
liked by the masses, and that monarchy as such is tyrannical and 
a menace to the people. Such is not the fact nowadays whatever 
may have been the state of affairs some time ago. Indeed in some 
respects monarchy is actually rather a good thing for the masses 
as it personifies the state, and gives the people an objective to look 
at instead of abstractions and indefinitenesses. It serves the same 
purpose toward the modern state and loyalty as the picture or image 
does in religion. It is a tangible symbol and as such can be loved or 
the reverse. And that is important for the masses of men who de- 
sire to lavish their feelings upon something like themselves and 
must indeed have an anthropomorphic god. Moreover, the cost of 
monarchy is not high, and many American millionaires live much 
more expensively than the British royal family. 



Owners of camping and hotel grounds, and other 
Trespassing property, especially those with running streams, are 

often annoyed by trespassers who apparently believe 
that all waters of any kind or size are at their particular service, to 
be fished in, or otherwise abused. These aggressive anglers do not 
seem to realize that streams are not public property, unless navig- 
able, and that all rights in the same are vested in the person who 
owns the land through which the stream flows. 

Notwithstanding this fact, owners of country property are some- 
times compelled to resort to caveman methods in getting rid of these 
offenders, who pay no attention to "No Trespassing" signs or other 
admonitions. Vandalism is one of the commonest crimes, and should 
be dealt with by a stringent code of procedure. 



A GREAT MAN GONE 

It is very rarely indeed the writer in a newspaper may truly say 
that a great man has passed away. The paragrapher in his work 
has to write all kinds of obituaries and it is necessary to say the 
best about the ones who have left us for the Great Adventure. No 
man in the recent history of San Francisco so well deserved the 
title of great as John A. Britton. There is no need to draw on the 
imagination or to call on charity to find words of glowing commen- 
dation as to the big-hearted financier. He was more than a financier, 
he was almost a statesman. His life was a benefit to everyone whom 
he came in contact with directly, as it was an enobling influence, 
and to millions indirectly it was also a distinct benefit because of 
the myriads of industries he encouraged through the great corpora- 
tion of which he was long the head. John A. Britton was the friend 
of the lowly and the high, his comprehensions of men was limitless 
and because of this his charitable consideration of their virtues and 
their faults made him dearly beloved of all. It may be said without 
exaggeration that John A. Britton has done more for the State of 
California than has any other man of his generation. 



Quite the most asinine recent remark: Supervisor Schmitz candi- 
datorially remarked that the condition of lower Market street (pres- 
ently being reconditioned) is disgraceful! Wonder if Schmitz de- 
clines to bathe because it messes the water? 



The mills of efficiency grind slowly. Poor fellow has been dead 
twelve years who first suggested a ci\il examination be held for 
the various superintendencies still held by political favorites. 




By ANTISTHENES 

-Often, beauty revealed is where art has concealed. 



-Skimmed milk of human kindness is the residue of vulgar pub- 



licity. 



— Matches may be made in heaven but quite a few are consum- 
mated in its antipodes. 



— Longest and best observed strike on record: Walkout against 
the Ten Commandments.. . . 



— Some, whose charity begins at home, never suffer that virtue to 
stray far from their premises. 



— A rara avis: The Delaware jailbird who refused a pardon be- 
cause he was so sure he'd be back. 



— Chalk up one against the sob sisters. A brutal murderer has 
been hanged despite their notoriety-induced eye-drips. 



— In the School of Diplomacy, Master of Duplicity and Doctor of 
Mental Reservation are the two highest degrees conferred. 



— Politicians do not so much object to a rich man's running inde- 
pendent before, as they fear his running independent after, election. 



— News item: Lenz Germans abolish God; they will henceforth 
worship Richard Wagner's god, Wodan. Another case of "Made in 
Germany." 



— In a monarchy the public has very little to say but would like to 
say much; in a democracy the public has much to say but usually 
says very little. 



— Speaking of secretaries, Ford's reputed lack of letters should not 
deter him from running. A well-dressed man is as his man well 
dressed him. 



— What is the angle? Rock — whoever that is — is out for sheriff! 
Suppose he is bait for anti-Finns and semi-pro-Robbs? That would 
elect Finn. Great game. 



— Do you know, in a democracy the president usually is soma 
one you never knew, proposed by delegates you didn't know and 
elected by electors you never will know? 



— Well, the supervisors' annual picnic at Yosemite — and inci- 
dentally. Hetch Hetchy -this year costs the city $844.96, not includ- 
ing stuff for medicinal purposes. 



— Who called off those prohibition dogs of war? They had the 
hot scent on the Hetch Hetchy trail but apparently some enemy hath 
sown pepper thereon! Or. was it pepper? 



— The materials of which many of our churches are builded could 
be put to a good use; a number of our ablest preachers could func- 
tion in a manner beneficial to humanity. 



Whv interfere with China's internal warring? In that school of 
Kperience she will learn that decimation, applied against her rapid 
multiplying, may subtract from her adding troubles. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 



Not For (All) Medical Men 





By R. BERKELEY 



THE easiest way to gain a reputation for exceptional ability is 
to deny what is plainly true, or support (not strenuously but 
positively), theories clearly untenable. If you can do these things 
in an amusing way a few times, any way in which you do them 
will be considered amusing, for just so long as your vitality 
remains fairly strong. It is not so difficult as some think, to become 
a Bernard Shaw or a G. K. Chesterton, if you take pains (without 
which the top of no pedestal can be reached). 

To give an instance, someone has achieved immortality for the 
saying that it is the obvious that is never seen. Sounds clever, is just 
untrue. It is the obvious that is seen, that does happen. To sup- 
port which statement, I am writing about the medical profession. 
They have had their little day with us, have both informed and 
amused us. Informed us of much that we may or may not regard 
as information a few years hence, amused us with their lack of 
any sense of humor. For they really believe, most of them, that 
the newest thing they know is knowledge; they cannot or will not 
read the past; the word "perhaps" seldom enters into their vo- 
cabulary. 

Doctors are an endless source of amusement to me. 1 have had 
so much to do with them. I have played with them personally (and 
they with me) ; have been officially connected with them in Public 
Health work. That what follows in this article may not be mis- 
understood- -I am a much misunderstood person — I wish at the 
outset to say that I owe to the solicitous care and skill of the pro- 
fession the continuance of a life without which my own would be 
of as little worth to me as it must be to others— if they have any 
sense. A debt I can never repay; an admission that I make, be- 
lieving that antidotes should precede diseases. Which is not far re- 
moved from the modern medical theory that Prevention is better 
than Cure. And it is right; if you are beginning to entertain doubts 
as to your ability to cure, prevention will save you many gibes, 
maybe, also, personal regrets. 

As I have said, I have met many doctors (of medicine — one has 
to be plain in a country where everyone is a doctor, if he is not a 
judge or general). Three, one a specialist, would be surprised to 
hear that I am thriving in the "fogs" of this delightful climate, 
when I ought to be dust in some graveyard many thousands of 
miles away. For they were good enough to donate me tuberculosis, 
in spite of my protests and disbelief. With one of them I had great 
fun. He was so sure of his diagnosis that he did not condescend 
to have my sputum tested. I said nothing, but sent it myself to a 
medical friend who was testing specimens every day of his life. 
He told me afterwards that he had made a very careful examina- 
tion, being sorry for me, and that he was sure that there had 
been no trace of the little devil supposed to be browsing on my 
vitals. To my own medical attendant and to the specialist I said 
nothing. I had to have some fun to compensate me for the suffer- 
ing I was really undergoing — I was sick, no doubt of that. One 
day it occurred to my professional attendant to suggest an examina- 
tion of that which had already been examined, unknown to him. 
I had to express to him my profound regrets that the flow had ceased 
— nothing doing. To this day he does not know what I am telling 
the readers of this paper, not for worlds would I have told him, 
poor fellow. He regards me as numbered with the saints (perhaps), 
who may have cured me of the mental malady he also endowed 
me with, merely because I told him that I proposed to attend his 
funeral, not to have him attend mine. 



We really should not say unkind things of medical men. They 
are so generous. One of them, an American this time, bestowed 
on a brother of mine some form of kidney affection, treated him 
for it for two years, nearly — not quite, he still persists in enjoy- 
ing a healthy existence — killed him. Fortunately — wives come in 
useful sometimes — his life partner kicked, called in another doctor, 
who pricked the bubble and cured the non-existent trouble by cur- 
ing the real one. 

Space forbids much more, but I must share another joke. I 
rarely eat meat pies, but on one occasion about 20 years ago, I 
fell. Next day I felt pretty bad, left my office hurriedly, hied me 
home, stopping only for a shave (men look so awful, sick and un- 
shaven). I remembered little until I saw my doctor, an Irishman, 
bending over me in a subdued light. I was in what I suppose would 
be called a comatose condition. Next morning, I felt a little better, 
but pretty sick. Preferring movement to bed, I walked about the 
room, thinking about anything but doctors, when a gentle knock 
was followed by my Irish friend's entrance. "Good God," he shouted, 
"get back into bed. Man alive, you ought to be dead." I ex- 
pressed my sorrow at his disappointment, and obeyed his orders 
for two or three weeks. I made little progress, and ventured to 
suggest thaf a dose of castor oil might be a good idea (my malady 
was ptomaine poisoning). "God bless me, why did I not think of 
it?" said the learned physician. He sent me a dose, which nearly 
justified his original prediction. I asked him if he had played a 
joke on me, to which he replied that he meant to "get one in" for 
my previous conduct. 

Much more I could tell. Yet I believe in doctors, have nothing 
but contempt for their detractors, hope the day will never come 
when quackery will gain the upper hand, as it seems to be doing. 
I even considered it my duty to get sick the week the medical 
profession foregathered here, consulted a doctor, and to my surprise 
(and possibly his) 1 have experienced a marvelous recovery. 

I would not dream of hollaring before I am out of wood, and 
I feel somehow that they will get me yet. 



^rw 


MARY HBRETH CAROLINE JONES : 


* — . . — ._.. 


Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2:30, ! 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 i 
„_. — . ._. .— — _.._.+ 



JOSEPH E. RUCKER, Jr. 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 
CROCKER BUILDING 
Also LARGE COUNTRY HOLDINGS 
Exchanged lor City Property 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY.- 

NEW YORK 



'The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



July 7. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




,4-IdVejyou 

HE/3RDIT? 



— A clergyman once told a story concerning a man he had ap- 
proached for a contribution towards the church funds. No amount 
of persuasion would make the man give anything, and at last he 
said to him, "Why not? Isn't the cause a good one?" "Yes," an- 
swered the man, "but the fact of the matter is I owe too much 
money. I must be just before I'm generous, you know." "But sure- 
ly," said the clergyman, "you owe your Maker a larger debt that 
you do anybody else?" "That's true," was the reply, "but He isn't 
pushing me like the rest of my creditors." 

— A popular member of the Family Club has a fund of good stories, 
and the following is one of them: A man saw a safety razor ad- 
vertised for the small sum of $1. He wrote to the firm asking 
them to send one, and having no postal order, he wound up his 
letter by saying that he was omitting to enclose the $1, but he was 
sure a firm of their reputation would send the razor. He received 
a reply acknowledging the receipt of his order, but they informed 
him they were omitting the razor, as a man with his "cheek" had 
no need for one. 

* -f * 

— Two well-known actors were playing golf, and every stroke 
proclaimed that they were novices at the game. Several fair-sized 
clods of turf had been sent skywards, and when one unusually large 
piece departed from its native soil, one of the accompanying caddies 
turned to the other and whispered, "Did ye tell me they were 
actors, Bill?" "Yes," answered the other. "Well," was the reply, 
"all I can say is, they ought to be scene shifters." 

— A tramp stopped at a farmhouse one evening and asked for a 
job in return for a night's lodging and meals. The farmer put him 
to milking the cows, but a few moments later the tramp reported 
that the flies were so bad that the cows would not stand still long 
enough to be milked. 

The farmer looked at his watch and replied 
an hour, till supper time. The flies will all be 
then and you can milk in peace." 

■f- ¥ * 

— A little undersized man stood in the dock with his head swathed 
in bandages, and after surveying him the magistrate turned to the gen- 
erously-proportioned lady who occupied the witness box. "My good 
lady," he said, waving his hand towards the dock," do you mean to 
say that that poor little physical wreck struck you in the way you de- 
scribed?" The lady snorted indignantly. "But he wasn't a physical 
wreck until he had struck me," was her emphatic rejoinder. 
* * * 

— Among the numerous anecdotes told is one concerning a conver- 
sation overheard one night between two cabmen who were waiting 
outside a theater. "And wot's the matter with you?" inquired one. 
"Nothing's the matter with me," retorted the other. "Why?" "Well," 
answered the first, "you gave me a nasty look." "Me?" scornfully 
answered the second cabby. "You certainly 'ave a nasty look, but I 
didn't give it to you." 



'Wait about half 
the dining room 



— The chief of police says there is urgent need for more patrol- 
men. Well, chief, you have twenty-four of the finest doing book- 
keeping, stenography, etc. Why not put clerks in their places — if a 
cop can do the work, surely a clerk can. 



BABCOCKS 

RED 
BOOK 

of 

RULES 

f° r 

Trade Mark Reg. V. S. Pat. Oft. 
(2nd Edition > 

The only recognized authority on Mali Jongg. 

Price $2.50 wherever Mali Jongg is sold, or direct 
from us if your dealer cannot supply you. 

Cloth Bound Lithographed Cover. Its 117 pages are 
profuselyillustrated and contain what you want to know 

Mah Jongg Sales Company of America 

1270 Broadway, New York — 30 S. State St., Chicago 
:•><> Spear St., San Francisco 




-the better it gets* 




GEO. W. CASWKLL 

Telephone i i 
Sutter I akland 1017 

l.HOO.000 nipt «r«M Mivad at the Pan- 
ama-Parifir International reposition. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 



TownpJLCrier 




) WHO THE DEVILflRT THOU. 
"ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
I OEVIL.SIR WITH VOU." 

Shakspeare- 



— Senator James A. Reed of Missouri has been cutting quite a 
swathe in this part of the country as advance agent against the presi- 
dent. He has a good platform against the international court idea but 
he spoils it with a turgid and antiquated southern oratory which is 
utterly unsuited to today. It is also in the last degree unfair. Thus 
when he says: "I would not sacrifice the sovereignty of my country 
to save the whole world." he seems to imply that the president 
wants to sacrifice the sovereignty of the country, which is pure rot, 
because of course he does not and Mr. Reed knows it. Why will 
orators treat us like babies? 

— Have you noticed the educators who are now beginning to fill 
our streets and those of Oakland? Did you ever see a crowd in 
which the characteristics were so marked and which showed so 
conclusively the marks of the teacher? And they are not marks of 
dignity, either. Why is that? Why should the teaching profession, 
which is one of the most noble of callings, yet mark off its followers 
with a touch of something which makes them at least incompatible 
with the better types in the learned professions? Unless that ques- 
tion can be answered teachers will always occupy a subsidiary po- 
sition. . . . 

— Says the Pacific Coast manager of the United States line, Wil- 
liam G. Fitch, with respect to the new ship Leviathan, concerning 
whose trial trip much scandal has arisen, — "Many of the passengers, 
particularly from California, insisted upon reserving an entire state- 
room or suite even for a few people." There is no doubt that we 
Califormans are at present the most prosperous people in the world 
and likely to remain so, for a time at least. Now is the time to get 
some measure of esthetic growth out of our wealth. Cabarets, ex- 
pensive staterooms and cars de luxe are not justification enough 
for wealth nowadays. 

— It is said that more than a thousand new enterprises, commer- 
cial and industrial, have been established in San Francisco during 
the last six months, this according to the industrial department of 
the Chamber of Commerce. Of course some of them are small, 
but taking into consideration the fact that the last six months have 
shown record breaking results in bank clearings, post office receipts, 
real estate sales and building operations, we are safe in saying that 
we are in the midst of a period of great expansion for the city. 
And there is no reason why it should not continue. 

— So the Dominicans are having their parish jubilee. One would 
like to say a word for this order and for the magnificent work which 
it has been doing for the last fifty years. It was a great loss when 
their lovely church was destroyed in the 1906 fire and it will be a 
fine thing for the city when they can adequately replace it. The 
church was a delight, dignified and beautiful. We wish all success 
to the Dominican fathers who through the centuries have wrought 

* * A 

— Rabbi Martin Meyer, whose death has shocked the community, 
was a man of very great parts, so great indeed that the leadership 
of even so great and powerful a congregation as Emmanuel was 
not enough for a person of his force and learning. He was a mine 
of information and his nine years in Brooklyn had given him an 
insight into the immigrant, particularly of his own race, such as 
very few, if any, have had. He was a delightful person to talk to 
and had a delicious and deep humor and an inherent gentleness. 



— They are bothering the children about vacation reading and the 
plan seems to have taken its origin in a well known bookshop to 
whose advantage it is that books should be sold. The Town Crier 
wants to go on record against this harrassing children with books 
which he is inclined to think do not amount to as much as they 
are cracked up to be. This is a wonderfully beautiful land and 
the boys and girls are much better off in immediate contact with 
nature than in messing themselves up mentally with anybody's books. 
Genius is developed not by pouring over books but by contact with 
facts and the practice of keen observation. 

— And so the agitation is on foot for a new postoffice building. 
How time does fly! It seems only yesterday that this building was 
erected and the courts and federal work for the most part trans- 
ferred to it from the Appraisers' building! By the way, both these 
federal buildings stood through the great shock; the Appraisers 
being saved by its independent water supply. No one can deny, 
however, that the time is ripe for a new building, and the present 
structure is quite inadequate. It is to be hoped that the same scan- 
dal will not accompany the erection of the new building as marked 
the last when wholesale accusations of graft were freely bandied 
about. 

STATEMENT 

THE FRENCH AMERICAN BANK 

Savings — Commerc'al — Safe Deposit Vaults 

108 Sutter Street, San Francisco, California 

Brandies — 1009 Grant Ave., anil 3rd St. unit Paeon Ave. 

.Member of 

THE ASSOCIATED SAVINGS BANKS OF SAN FRANCISCO 

THE FEDERAL, RESERVE SYSTEM 

June 30, 1923 

RESOURCES 

Cash on Hand and in Banks $ 1,733,241.50 

Loans and Discounts Less Rediscounts 11,060.567.10 

Letters of Credit 175,650.47 

United States, Municipal and Other Bonds 3,396,884.74 

Bank Premises 505.809.88 

Safe Deposit Vaults 27,781.76 

Furniture and Fixtures 13,584.61 

Real Estate 1.00 

TOTAL RESOURCES $16,913,521.06 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Paid In ..$ 1,250,000.00 

Surplus 350,000.00 

Undivided Profits 236,349.31 

Contingent Fund 42,501.89 

Letters of Credit, etc 122,957.17 

Bills Payable None 

Deposits 14,911,712.69 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $16,913,521.06 

OFFICERS: 

Leon Bocqueraz, President 
.1. M. Dupas, Vice-President .1. A. Bergerot, Vice-President 

¥7. F. Duffy, Vice-President and Cashier 

\ Bpusquet. Secretarj Chas. I.. Bbner Jr.. Asst. Cashier 

.1. irilarry, Asst. Cashier w. A. Sanders, Assistant Cashier 

I'. A. Bergerot and a. P. Dessouslavy, Attorneys 

DIRECTORS: 

■'■ A Bergerot w. i, Brol k John Ginty 

s, Bissinger Charles Carpy .1. s i;..d.-an 

Leon Bocqueraz .1 .u, Dupas Geo. w. McNear 

Roger I leraz C Hellwig. \. \k- Pichon 

The Accounts of Individuals, Firms and Corporations Are Solicited 



July 7, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



A Phenomenal Growth 



It has always been conceded San Francisco is the great money 
market of the Pacific Coast region, but at no time in its history 
has it loomed with the importance of today. San Francisco is a 
money dictator. There are but few cities in the world occupying 
so distinctly strong a position in the financial operations of a vast 
and rich empire as does this city by the Golden Gate. If the reader 
will take the time to digest the facts published in the annual state- 
ments of the various banks and make comparisons with the months 
and the years of the past this fact will impose itself without room 
for any argument whatever to the contrary. 

The Bank of Italy 

This year the Bank of Italy, one of the largest money institutions 
of the United States, publishes a statement covering the operations 
not only of the bank and its branches in San Francisco but of its 
operations as a whole. The story of a stupendous growth is shown 
best by a comparison of the figures, given in the account of the 
resources. Without going into the detailed statement, which is found 
in the published advertisements, one may easily see how much this 
bank has expanded by comparing the year 1904 with the present 
half year. The figures as given for 1904 are $285,436.97 and for 
the year 1923 to June 29th $272,727,800.97. Last year's record 
was $254,282,289.52. 

The First Federal Trust Company 

The First Federal Trust Company's report is illuminating as to 
a rapid growth in power. Its total resources amount to $25,1 14,249.- 
46. This bank and trust company is characterized by its most 
careful management and there is no financial institution in the city 
possessing such a strong array of names as its officers and directors. 

French American Bank 

This is another of the banks of this great city earning for itself 
the patronage of some of the very best business houses. From the 
start this bank has been extraordinarily well managed and its growth 
has kept pace with the growth of the business of the city. It is 
exceptionally well situated and this has aided it not a little in reach- 
ing out for the business man's account. Its list of officials and di- 
rectors contains the name of some of the most substantial citizens 
of San Francisco. It will pay the business man to study this bank's 
annual statement. 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan 

It must be with a feeling of pride that officials of this bank send 
out the half yearly statement showing its business. San Francisco 
has many savings banks but none stands higher in the estimation 
of the public than this old institution. This statement is the one 
hundredth and eleventh half yearly publication. The bank is a 
commercial as well as a savings bank and it has four branches, 
located so as to serve the convenience of the public. 

The Hibernia Bank 

A statement in a newspaper, regarding the banks of this great 
city, would never be complete without a mention of the Hibernia 
Bank. This great financial organization is so intertwined in the 
affairs of the big Pacific Coast metropolis that it has become a part 
of its history. The management of the Hibernia Bank is such, and 
always has been such, that it is considered almost perfection as 
to the conduct of a bank of savings. Here again it will undoubtedly- 
pay all to carefully read the statement published by the bank. Thi> 
statement shows as nothing else can the wonderful growth of the 
Hibernia Bank. 



The Crocker National Bank 

A remarkable healthy expansion is shown by this popular and 
long-established institution. With total resources aggregating $48,- 
820,588.08, and with a directorate comprising some of the most 
prominent business men of San Francisco, this bank deservedly 
possesses a name that is synonymous with power and solidity. 



WARNING 

to Hikers, Campers 
and All Other Persons 

Notice is hereby given that camping, hiking, fishing, hunting or 
otherwise being upon the property known as 

"Camp Taylor" or "Rodgers Ranch" 

Marin County. California, is without the permission of the owner of 
said property; is forbidden and all persons camping, hiking, fishing, 
or otherwise being upon the said property are trespassers. 

The following railroad stations are located on the above property, 
to wit: Shafter Station, Cam)) Berkeley, Irving and Taylorsville, 
and all persons getting off the trains at these stations and leaving 
the stations become trespassers on the above property within the 
purview of this notice. 

Thai no person or persons have any right or authority whatsoever 
from the owner of said property to give permission or the privilege 
for a charge or fee to persons to hike, camp or otherwise be upon 
the said property. 

All persons hi reafter found or being upon the said property, whether 
under authority of persons purporting to sell the privilege of camp- 
ing, hiking or otherwise being upon the said property will be ar- 
rested as trespassers and dealt with according to law, 

ELIZABETH A. RODGERS, Owner of Camp Taylor Property 





THE 

rDfiftfTD MATIfiMAI DAWlf 




IKIMLK NAllUiNAL dAM 

OF SAX FRANCISCO 




i (imiition XT CLONE <>l III BINKH8 11 \i: SO, 1028 




KBSOI Ki l - 




Loans and Discounts (27,848.726.46 




i ithei 942,1 88.1 I 
i 'apital St "i- In i-'. di <■ Bank of S 

225,000.00 
Customers Liabtllts under Letters of Credit 1.905,422.29 
and Sight Exchange 




*48,8: > ".5RX.ii8 




LIABILITIES 




Capital 1 -. 9,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided IT.. Iits 7. 020, 
'ir.iilMti.in 1,961,900.00 




Bank 1.500,001 

Deposits 84,215,66 




J 18, 8211. 588.08 




OFFICERS 




WM II CROCKER, President 




Jas. J. Fagan.Vice-Pres. 1 1 .1. Murphy. Ass*. Cashier 
J. B. McCargar. Vice-Pres. A C Head. Asst. Cashier 
Win W. Crocker, Vioa-Pres, W. D. Lux, Asst Cashier 
F .; Willis. Cashier .1 A. Rounds, Asst Cashier 
G w Ebner, Asst. Cashier Bdwarti T. Harrison, Asst. Ca 
B ; Bt Cashier H ' 1 ' trr. Frgn. Dept. 
J. M r Cashier H H Haiftht. Asst. Mgr Fn. Dept. 
G. Feris Baldwin. Auditor 




I!CI\RII OF DIRF.CTORS 




Wm II Cr< S. F B. Morse 
Templet. «n Crocker .1 IV M'-^Cargar 
Jas .1 Fagan - E "ireen A Q. Qxffflo 
William W. Crocker 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 




By KEM 

"Wear the old coat and buy the new book." — Austin Phelps. 

NOW and then in this age of much advertised, turned out-by- 
machinery type of literature there comes a book worth wear- 
ing the old coat to buy, and the life of Cyrus K. Curtis, editor and 
publisher, as depicted in "THE MAN FROM MAINE" by Edward 
W. Bok, is one of the truly worth while. It is "America let loose," 
as one admirer tells us, and adds further: "The story here told 
seeks not merely to trace a business life, but to emphasize the great 
truth, particularly to young men, that business is a great adventure 
.... and that success in general is gained by the old heroic quali- 
ties — steadfast courage, integrity, vision — not by overbearing force, 
or sharp cunning." Scribner's. $3.00. 

THE AMERICANIZATION OF EDWARD W. BOK and UP- 
STREAM by Ludwig Lewisohn are two famous autobiographies that 
are still in demand. "The Americanization of Edward Bok," a lead- 
ing book wherever English is read, obtained the Pulitzer prize in 
1920 and has been through several large editions. "Upstream" 
makes us a debtor for its beautiful English, the courageous uncov- 
ering of a warped and twisted life, and the searchlight it throws 
upon many of our shortcomings as seen through the eyes of a Ger- 
man-Jew immigrant, but it was our privilege to hear some fash- 
ionable women readers review these two much-talked of books from 
an entirely new angle: 

"I read old Edward Bok," said the young woman with the long 
ear-rings, "and all I can remember is that he just worshiped women 
till he edited The Ladies Home Journal, and one woman said to 
him: 'It's no use, Mr. Bok, trying to reform us women from wear- 
ing feathers and furs — no matter if it means a thousand tortures 
to the poor beasts and birds in traps, for furs make us prettier,' 
and then poor Edward died of a broken heart — " 

"He didn't die- -he lived to write the "Man From Maine — " 

"Well I wish he had, then, before his old Ladies Home Journal 
told those forty squirrel heads on my fur to say Inhuman Monster 
every time I wear it." 

"Oh, but he doesn't make one one-half so uncomfortable as does 
Ludwig Lewisohn," said the worried looking woman in spectacles. 
"Upstream makes you feel you put your children in traps when 
you send them to American colleges — that they only learn about 
football and fudge and don't get — don't get " 

"Yes, don't get 'emotional-intensity' lines on their faces like Rus- 
sians," interrupted the militant looking lady, "why should they? 
Why shouldn't American youth look happy? And what does this 
Lewisohn mean any way harking forward to the time, before he is to 
die, and seeing in retrospect the women he has loved 'freely and 
magnificently' — the one that had 'the trick of laughing at the dawn' 
— the 'somber brows and hair of another, with her splendor of mind 
and passion' — now wouldn't you think his faithful wife, Mary, would 
object to that?" 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 
239 Post Street 



PAUL ELDER'S 



San Francisco 



"Probably 'advanced' like he is, and looking forward to looking 
backward at a procession of 'husbands" all the same as Madeline 
Marks," said the Irish-exiracted Librarian. 

"Then give me Bok," said the militant lady — "he started in Dutch 
— but he ended American, and we'll all get in 'dutch' if we follow 
Lewisohn." 

Such is fame in a modern fiction library. 

The Americanization of Edward Bok, Scribners. $3.00. 

Upstream, Boni, Liverwright. $3.00. 



Because Senator Scott puts in more time in Sacramento, perhaps, 
than Supervisor Scott (same hombre — two salaries) does in San 
Francisco, he has affinity for Gopher Prairies; hence, his introduc- 
ing an ordinance to change Market to Main street. 

First Federal Trust Company 

Affiliated with The Firttt National Hank of Sun Franclnco 
Savings — Commercial — Trust 
Post and Montgomery Streets 

Statement of Condition, June 30, 1923 



RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate $10,724,845.84 

Other Loans and Discounts 2,731,095.46 

State, County and Municipal Bonds 1,496,491.52 

Corporation Bonds 2,905,724.70 

Real Estate 4,612.34 

Furniture and Fixtures 50,356.30 

Other Resources 14,232.26 

United States Bonds and Certificates 4,078,666.25 

Cash and Due from Barks 3,108,224.79 



Toial $25,114,249.46 

LIABILITIES 

Capital $ 1,500,000.00 

Surplus 425,000.00 

Undivided Profits 373,143.19 

Deposits 22,758,930.73 

Other Liabilities 12,175.54 

Dividends Unpaid 45,000.00 



Total $25,114,249.46 



John A Hooper 

J. G. HOOPER 
i:. i: HARDO'W 
CLINTON E. WORDEN 
WARREN in. MOV .IK 

c. ii Mccormick .. . 

M. R. CLARK . . 

I.. A McCRYSTLE 
«'. B. HOBSON 
S. W. DRASCi IV1CH 

G. W. MALI. . . . 

A. 10 CURTIS 

W. H. CAMERl IN 
.1 II. EASTMAN 



SAMUEL n 
GEORGE 1' 

II' IBERT T. 

rti IBERT 15. 

A RTHJJR Hi IODALL 

10. i'. HOLMES 

JOHN A. in li iPER 

CLIFTON II. Kl:i. 1. 1 



1.(1 Mill 
Bl lAKI i.MAX 

COOPER 
DEVLIN 
EASTON 



FICKKS 

President 

Vice-President and Manager 

Vice-President and Secretary 

Vice-President 

Vice-President 

.. ..Treasurer 

i !ashler 

Trust ( ifflcer 

Realty Loan Officer 
Assistant Secretary 
Assistant Secretary 

Assistant Cashier 

Assistant Cashier 

Assistant Trust Officer 

OF DIRECTORS 

WALTER S. MARTIN 
.1. K. MOFFITT 
P. i'. MORGAN 
.1. H. XEWBAL'ER 
\VA RREN OLNET Jit. 
\V. T. SMITH 
CLINTON 10. WORDEN 



Savings Deposits made on or before July 10th, 1923, will earn 
interest from July 1st, 1923 



July 7, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




"TO LOVERS, LINGERING—" 

Pierrot, Pierrette, 
The grass is wet 

With silver dew; the moon has set. 
Dawn cheer is chill — why linger yet, 

Pierette? 
Can you not see how moonlight goes, 
A dusky blur proclaims the rose? 
That rose against your lips was set 

And yet 
Tomorrow other roses blow! 
Be wise, disdain the flower and go — 

Ah, go, 
Lest day should find you reft, forlorn, 
Sad as all ghosts that walk at dawn, 
Wan as lost love, and wise in woe, 

Pierrot ! 

—Ellen Morrill 
From "American Poetry Magazine." 



Mil 



COVENANT 

Thou shalt be beautiful unto the end 
Even as thou wert faithful from the start. 
Thou didst not ask the forfeit of my heart 
Because thou lov'st me, or thou wast my friend; 
Nor sought my pride to break, my will to bend. 
As others who have used me on the mart. 
Winning their unearned triumphs through my art, — 
Quick to forget me on the road they wend. 

Thou shalt be beautiful unto the last; 

For where my faith was wantonly betrayed 

Thou didst not fail, though 'twere thy dying breath. 

So I have built my sanctuary fast 

In thee, who knoweth how my soul hath made 

Its covenant with trust, more strong than death. 

— Gustav Davidson. 



VAGRANTS 

You will not think it strange to hear me say: 
These butterflies that drift above the lawn 

Are frail and lovely women come astray 

Out of the old, old night where they had gone; 

Once they were beautiful as you are now. 

And here they faint and flutter and draw near 

hor some remembered word of hair or brow. 

Such as I speak, such as you learn to hear. 

Wayfarers all, they pass beneath the moon, 
Threading the purple byways of the dark. 

To seek, I think, no white, impossible boon. 
But just to hover near us and to hark 

1 liese words of mine in praise of one who wears 
Through later days such beauty as was theirs. 

— By David Morton. 

From "Voices." 



Those pet police nags you see along Market street will cost you 
$16,200 the coming year for stablemanning, not including meals 
and found. That would purchase quite a fleet of motorcycles with 
resultant increased efficiency. 



Man proposes, but a convention disposes. 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF CONDITION 

HEAD OFFICE AND BRANCHES 

Bank of Italy 

Savings Commercial Trust 

HEAD OFFICE, SAN FRANCISCO 

June 20, l!r;:t 

RESOURCES 

First Mortgage I„oans on Real Estate (100,350,768.74 

other Loans and Discounts 78,708.1*88.28 $179,059,457.02 

United States Bonds and 

Certificates of Indebtedness 
State. County and Municipal Bonds 
i >ther Bonds and Securities 
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 



$ 34,379,695.31 
.. U,625,600;62 

8.455.717.07 
600,000.00 



TOTAL U. S, AND OTHER SECURITIES 

Hue from Federal Reserve Bank $ 10 613 127 04 

Cash and Due from Other Banks i | 035'564'77 



TOTAL CASH AXI) DUE FROM BANKS 
Banking Premises. Furniture. Fixtures 

and Safe Deposit Vaults 

other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of 

Credit and Acceptances 
Uncollected Interest 
Employes' Pension Fund (Carried oil Books'at) 



I 



Resources 



55,061,013.00 



24,648,681.81 

9.655,7:10.21 
548,220.12 

1.218,517.26 
2,266,460.96 

1.110 
2110.710.50 



TOTAL RESOURCES 



.TL'T.snn.:,? 



LIABILITIES 

DEPOSITS 

ti rigal ion I ifstricl Funds 

Dividends Unpaid 

i Hscounts I lollected bul Nol Earned 

Letters of Credit Acceptances and I 



$247. 380. 221. 00 

90,417.88 

998,106.00 

72.773.71 
1.218.517.211 



CAPITAL RAID IX 
SURPLUS 

I imIiv i.l, ,1 I Touts 

Interest Earned bui Xr.i Collected 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 



1249,764,089 3 l 

16.000 

5,000,1 "ii 

697,300.70 
2,2(6 i'.'i 96 



>272.727.K T 



All charge-olfs, expenses and Interest payable i" end "f half-year have 
been deducted in the above statement 

The Story of Our Growth 

As shows i'> >i Comparative Slatomenl of Our Beoonreea 
December. 1904 ,$28E 

December, l!>«n *i. .-,74.001.011 

December, 1912 $11. 22s.su. 51; 

December, 1016 189,805,995.24 

December. 1920 $157,464,685.08 

December, 1922 $254,282,289.52 

June 29, 1923 $272,727,800.97 

MllllHI OF DEPOSITORS, l:lx.4.-.:l 

SiiOiiijs DepOBltfl mitile lii «n,l im-liiilinc Jul> 111. IMS, will mrn interest 

from July 1. 1921 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturer* of 

RIVETED sTEEI. l-IPI -.. T\^Kv IIIAEKTS. PLUMBS, 

PENSTOCKS. I. \snol IIKHS. ,\|||KI; STACKS, ETC. 

444 Market St. '.7 17 Santo Fe Are. 

Son Franoi.cn. Calif. Loa Aniele.. Calif. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 




BUSY CUPID 

HOUGHTON-BARRIER — Announcement was made Monday of 
the engagement of Miss Elsie Houghton, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward T. Houghton, of Berkeley, to Mr. Maurice 
Barrier of Paris, France. Miss Houghton was formally pre- 
sented to society at a large tea given last December by her 
parents at their home in Berkeley and was one of the most 
popular of last season's debutantes in trans-bay society. Short- 
ly before coming out she returned from a two years' sojourn 
abroad, where she traveled with her greataunt, the late Mrs. 
Hippolyte Dutard, whose death occurred recently. While in 
Africa Miss Houghton met her fiance. The bride-elect is a 
graduate of Miss Ransom's school in Berkeley, and Mr. Bar- 
rier is a graduate of the University of Paris. During the war 
he served for four years in the French army. He arrived 
in California June 23 and is occupying apartments at the 
Palace Hotel. He will be joined here later by his father, 
Mr. Georges Barrier. The marriage will take place either in 
the late summer or early fall and they will make their home 
in Paris. 
HANNA-KELLOGG — Miss Virginia Hanna, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard J. Hanna, and Chandler Kellogg, son of Mr. 
and Mrs. F. R. Kellogg of Los Angeles, were married at 4 
o'clock Saturday afternoon at the Hanna home in Burlingame. 
Rev. Josiah Sibley of Chicago, and former pastor of Calvary 
Presbyterian Church, officiated. The service was read in the 
garden and was followed by an out-of-door reception and 
tea, at which only members of the two families were present. 
WALTER-BARUCH — Extremely pretty was the wedding of Miss 
Mildred Walter and Frederick Baruch of Los Angeles, sol- 
emnized Sunday at high noon in the beautiful grounds of the 
residence of the bride's parents. Mr. and Mrs. Clarence R. 
Walter, at Atherton. Dr. Rinder of the Temple Emanu-El 
read the marriage ceremony. After the ceremony luncheon 
was served under the trees, and there was dancing in the 
house. Mr. and Mrs. Baruch will make their home in Los 
Angeles. 
THIEBAULT-CONLON — The engagement of Miss Leonie Thie- 
bault to Lieutenant Edward A. Conlon, U. S. N., was an- 
nounced last week. The wedding will be held early in the 
winter. 

BOXTON-BELLINI — The marriage of Miss Muriel Elizabeth Box- 
ton, a former San Francisco girl, to Signor Renato Bellini of 
Milano, Italy, was announced by her parents, Dr. and Mrs. 
Charles Boxton of this city. The wedding was held in Milano, 
June 19. 

LUNCHEONS 

CROCKER — Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker invited a number 
of their friends to share their hospitality at a luncheon 4 th 
of July. The affair had its setting at the Crocker home in 
San Mateo. 

WELCH — Mrs. Raymond Welch gave a small luncheon at her 
home in Burlingame Monday for her mother, Mrs. William 
F. Fullman, wife of Admiral Fullman, who is visiting her. 

TEVIS — In honor of Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt, Dr. Harry Tevis enter- 
tained at a luncheon last Friday at his country place at Alma, 
in the Santa Cruz mountains. The guests who motored down 
for the enjoyable affair were his sister, Mrs. Frederick W. 
Sharon, who is remaining over in the country for a several 
days' visit with her brother, Mr. and Mrs. George Kelham; 
Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge and Mr. Dixwell Hewitt. 
DINNERS 

McCORMICK — Mr. and Mrs. Ernest McCormick, who recently 
joined the fashionable colony at Atherton. where they will 
remain until the early fall, entertained at a dinner a few 



evenings ago in the country. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

65 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



MILLER — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller gave a small dinner at 
their home on Pacific avenue Monday evening for their niece, 
Miss Olive Watt, who is visiting them for a few days. Miss 
Watt is returning to the William Watt ranch at Longford, 
Cal., after a visit with her sister, Mrs. John Fredericks of 
Palo Alto, formerly Miss Elizabeth Watt. 

CHENEY — In honor of her brother, Dr. Garnett Cheney, who 
graduated this year from the Harvard Medical School, Miss 
Margaret Cheney entertained at a dinner Monday evening 
at the Woman's Athletic Club. Following the dinner, bridge 
was enjoyed at the home of the hostess in Spruce street. Dr. 
William Fitch Cheney and his son, Dr. Garnett Cheney, will 
sail August 1 on the steamer George Washington for Europe. 
Mrs. Cheney and her daughter, Miss Margaret Cheney, after 
the doctors' departure for New York and Europe, will go to 
Tahoe, where they will enjoy a month's stay. 

McCORMICK — Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. McCormick entertained 
at a party Tuesday afternoon in honor of their children, Miss 
Florence and Master Charles McCormick Jr. The afternoon 
was devoted to swimming and outdoor games. The children 
stayed to supper and afterwards there was a display of pyro- 
technics, which was the raison d'etre of the fete. All the 
children of the neighborhood were invited to the gathering. 

ROTH — Mr. and Mrs. William P. Roth entertained at a large 
dinner Monday evening at their home in Redwood City, when 
twenty-four guests enjoyed their hospitality. 

POPE — Wednesday evening Mrs. George A. Pope entertained at 
a dinner dance at the Burlingame Country Club in honor of 
her daughter, Mrs. Mosely Taylor of Boston. It was a large 
affair and included about two hundred guests. 

HEWITT — Mr. and Mrs. Dixwell Hewitt will leave this week 
by motor for Lake County, where they will join the fashion- 
able colony for the summer months. The Hewitts were guests 
of honor at a dinner which Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Avenali 
gave at their home last Friday evening. The others in the 
party were: Mrs. Joseph Sadoc Tobin, Mrs. Ashton Potter, 
Dr. Henry Kiersted and Georges Romanovsky. 
TEAS 

STILLMAN — In honor of Dr. Henry Noble McCracken, president 
of Vassar, Miss Lisa Stillman entertained at a reception yes- 
terday afternoon at the home of her parents, Dr. and Mrs. 
Stanley Stillman, in Broadway. The young hostess, who was 
graduated last term from Vassar, was assisted in receiving 



— Another 
Daylight Limited! 

Commencing July 5th 

We inaugurated Daylight Limited 
Service on 

Thursdays 

In addition to Fridays, Saturdays 
and Sundays 

IiV. San Francisco (3rd St) 7:-t."> a.m. 
\r. Los Angeles 8:30 p.m. 

Smoker, Coaches, Short-Order Diner 
(open all day), Free Observation Car 

Similar Service Northbound 

Our agents will gladly give you de- 
tailed information 

Southern Pacific Lines 

50 Post St Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 




July 7. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



her guests by several members of the Vassar Club. Miss 
Vera Hamilton ami Miss Elizabeth Kellam, the latter recently 
arrived from the Bast, presided at the tea table. 
IN TOWN AND OUT 

HOTAL1NG — Mrs. A. P. Hotaling and her daughter, Mrs. Alfred 
Swinnerton, are spending the summer at the Hotaling ranch. 
which is located near San Rafael. 

BREEDOX — Mr. John Breedon, who recently arrived from Paris 
to pass the summer holidays with his mother, Mrs. Frederick 
W. McNear, and Mr. McNear at their home in Menlo Park, 
is at present visiting his aunt, Mrs. Lelia Butler Stoddard, at 
her ranch, near Hollister. Mr. Breedon is taking a course in 
diplomacy at the Sorbonne University in Paris and at the end 
of his vacation will return to Paris to continue his studies. 

LA MONTAONE — Mr. and Mrs. Clinton La Montagne returned 
Sunday from Del Monte, where they passed several days last 
week. 

EBERLE — Admiral and Mrs. Edward Eberle left for Washing- 
ton, D. C, Monday. They were accompanied by Lieutenant 
Commander Thomas Starr King, the admiral's former flag 
lieutenant. 

MACONDRAY — Mrs. Atherton Macondray and her daughter, Miss 
Inez Macondray, are spending a fortnight in this city, where 
they are occupying the apartment of Mrs. Macondray Moore in 
Broadway. 

MORGANV-Mrs. Horace Morgan and her daughter, Miss Eleanor 
Morgan, will go to Santa Barbara this month, and will be at 
the Arlington. 

REYMAN — Mrs. M. Reyman returned on Friday after a four 
months' European visit. Mrs. Reyman is located at the Hotel 
Richelieu. 

DAVIS — Mrs. Norris King Davis and her daughters, Miss Mar- 
gery and Miss Nancy Davis, have returned to California from 
Europe, and are at their home in Montecito. 

JENNINGS — Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Jennings passed the week-end 
at Carmel, where they were the house guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. John Douglas Short, who have a house there for the 
summer. 

DIBBLE — Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Dibhle and their son, Oliver Dib- 
ble Jr., left last Friday for a several weeks' outing at Kla- 
math Falls, Ore. Later they will continue their trip further 
north up the Columbia River and also expect to visit Canada 
before their return. The Dibbles recently closed their home 
in town and have been at their ranch in Napa County. 

PALMER — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick S. Palmer have motored to 
Castle Craig for a week's visit. Later they will go to Feather 
River Inn for a couple of weeks before returning here. 

DUTTON— Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton arrived from the East this 
week. Mrs. Dutton will join Mr. Dutton at their apartments 
at the Hotel St. Francis, She lias been in New York for the 
past three months. The Duttons will have shortly for the 
Burlingame Country Club, where they will spend most of 
the summer. 

DODGE — Mrs. Washington limine with her sun. Master Wash- 
ington Dodge Jr., arrived in California last Friday and is 
visiting on her ranch, "The Dodge Orchard," at Princeton. 
They will pass the entire summer in California, returning to 
their home in New York in September. 

DEERING — Miss Franceses Deering, daughter of the Frank P, 
Deerings, who is to be numbered among the debutanti 
the coining winter, will visit for a week or so this month 
with Miss .Mary Bernice Moore at the M oore count ry place in 
the Santa Cruz mountains. 

TUBBS — Mrs. William S. Tubbs and Miss Kmilie Tnbbs. who 
have been south for the past six weeks, are enjoying a stay 

at Vista del Arroyo, in Pasadena. 

HANCHETT — Mr. and Mrs. Lewis K Hanchett and their daugh- 
ters, the Misses Lucy and Alice Hanchett. have closed their 
home in the Santa Cruz mountains and have gone to 9 
Barbara, where they have taken a bouse tor the whole sum- 
mer. 

xrc.KNT Baroness Nugent and her sister. Mrs. Elizabeth Mc- 
Donald, have taken a house at Carmel for the summer. 
Anion;; Baroness Xugenfs recent guests were Mr. and Mrs. 
Ashtiehl Ellis Stew Mrs. Stow was Miss Virginia Nugent. 




By AGXES KERR CRAWFORD 

JELIASON, director for the World Educational Films, with 
a party of six others, arrived in San Francisco by motor 
•Saturday for a stay of several days. Included in the party 
are Baby Betty, just two years old, youngest star of the silver 
screen, and a most lively and charming bit of a girl. Also Yale 
Boss, who was the first kiddie star of the films way back in the 
days of two reelers, hut who grew out of short trousers and off 
the screen several years ago, to return recently to the movie 
world as a good looking young man. He has, by the way, just 
finished playing under George D. Baker's direction in the Gold- 
wyn production of "The Magic-Skin." Their stop here is part 
of an extended motor trip through central and northern Califor- 
nia, looking for locations for "The Forty Niners," next picture of 
the organization, in wheh Baby Betty will be starred. 

Day by day the cast working in Eric Von Stroheim's pro- 
duction of "Greed" grows smaller and smaller. Frank Hayes has 
finished his part in the picture, and left for the South by motor 
last Wednesday. Fanny Midgley is also done, and has been re- 
leased. Dale Fuller has only to he murdered this week, and then 
she will he through. By the way, Miss Fuller has enjoyed life in 
San Francisco so much that she isn't at all anxious to go home. 
Jean Hersholt has finished his work in this part of the picture, 
and as he does not appear in the sequences to be made at Colfax, 
he will go to Los Angeles till it is time for his scenes in the very 
end of the picture, to be shot in the desert in Death Valley. Of 
course Zasu Pitts and Gibson (lowland are still hard at work; 
also Hughie Mack, whose little three hundred and sixty-eight 
pounds add much to the bulk of the company. If the present 
plans work out. the company will leave for Colfax to do the 
mine sequences about the twenty-fourth of July, 

* * * 

Few people think of moving picture directors as Church goers, 
and many of them would have been surprised to have seen lie- 
great Erie Von Strnbeim himself, and bis wile as devote meni- 
mers of the congregation, at High Mass on Sunday morning at 
old Saint Mary's on Grant avenue. In fact so unassuming is Von 

stroheim in private lite, that probably few of the congregation 

either saw or recognized him. 

Elmer Dyer, camera man with the Stenoscopic Productions, has 

left that organization and returned to Los Angeles on Friday. 
The next picture of the company will not be started for anothei 
month, owing to a little uncertainty in regard to their releasing 

ements Patrice Palmer, who was co-starred in their last 
picture, is also leaving the organization, but Director Walter W. 
Bell, aiel Range! Bill Miller, the leading man. will continui 

impany. Joseph Gonyea, signed as assistani 
the time being ai least, working in the South. 

* * ¥ 

The Gobi, -n cat.. Productions, with .lack Dewey as prodt 
manager, since their move to the Pacific Laboratories 8 
Turk street, are very bus} making advertising, industrial and 
commercial films, while thej get their capital together and every- 
thing in shape to begin the production of feature pictures, which 
they hope to do in the very near future. . 

* * * 

Hairy Ma. Kenzie. of the Kenmat Productions, returned from 
Xew York last week, after arranging to release through I'athe 
Hie first picture made by the company. The present title of the 
picture is -Tipped off." but then nihility that it may be 

changed before the film is given to the world in August. Mr. 
MacKenzie has cone to Los Angeles for a week, and futun 
durtion plans of the company will be announced a li' 

* * * 

Barbara Cassalton. film star from New York, spent - 
days last week in San Fran - 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 6130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Vrtn Neaa Are., at Osry Street -\\ r HAITI 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 
BLMEB M. WOODBURY Manner 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 




just barely possible that other houses may 
go down but not probable. 



By P. N. BER1NGER 



Cheap Money — II. 

THE desire for "cheap money" finds vic- 
tims among the people because of a 
wide spread belief that, if money were plen- 
tiful in quantity then more people would 
have plenty of money and there would also 
be enough minted or printed to reach all of 
us. 

It is almost a useless task to tell anyone, 
thoroughly convinced the above is a state- 
ment of facts, that the idea that plenty of 
money issued to the people means plenty of 
money for the people is a false statement 
of things, made by a person knowing he is 
lying or by another convinced that he is tell- 
ing the truth. 

For more than three hundred years the 
idea that plenty of money printed meant lots 
of money for everybody has swept the va- 
rious countries of the world just like some 
dread epidemic and always the result has 
been the same, — ruin follows in the wake of 
the cheap money epidemic and it always has 
and it always will. 

Those who preach for cheap money to- 
day are preaching the same thing preached 
many hundreds of years ago, preached in 
France at the time of the first Revolution, 
preached in Soviet Russia and in Germany 
today. 

Those who preach the doctrine of money 
a plenty, printed in unlimited quantities that 
all may have some, base their attitude on 
the assumption that the financiers and those 
who have money are the avowed and arch 
enemies of those that have little or no money, 
— the rich are oppressors and the poor the 
oppressed. 

Let us go back, as a matter of illustra- 
tion, to the days of William and Mary in 
Merrie Olde England. The date was 1693. 

Between that date and 1696 Hugh Cham- 
berlain tried in vain, with the help of the 
King, who needed the money to fight the 
Netherlands, to establish the English Land 
Bank. It is useless to go into details but 
let it be said that no more stupid plan has 
ever been evolved for the purpose of extract- 
ing money from those that had it and giving 
to those that had it not. And the plan 
failed absolutely. It was never really brought 
into life or actual working conditions before 
it was discovered that it was dead before 
it was born. Hugh Chamberlain offered to 
lend the Government two and a half million 
pounds at seven per cent. William was in 
pressing need to fight in the Netherlands and 
he welcomed the project and went so far as 
to make the first subscription to its funds, 



but his was the only large subscription ever 
made. A great meeting was held in behalf 
of the new bank and rooms were secured 
in various parts of London for the receiv- 
ing of subscriptions and agents were sent 
all over the country to inform the country 
gentlemen of the dawning of the new era of 
prosperity. Three weeks passed and it was 
then discovered that only six thousand five 
hundred pounds, including the King's five 
thousand, had been subscribed. When the 
last day of August came it was found that 
only two thousand one hundred pounds, in 
addition to the King's subscription, had been 
signed for. Then followed a total collapse 
of the affair. The reason for the failure was 
that the landed men hated the moneyed men 
and the moneyed men would do nothing 
whatever to foster the Hugh Chamberlain 
idea. The money class alone could furnish 
the funds to foster the existence of the Eng- 
lish Land Bank and that fact alone would 
have destroyed any practical value it may 
have had, but when to this is added the 
story of the ridiculous theories attached to 
the operation of the bank its absolute fail- 
ure could have been predicted by anyone 
who had the ability to keep his feet on the 
ground and his head out of the clouds. 

A Correction 

My attention has been called to what seems 
like a contradiction in statements made last 
week. In the first paragraph I made a state- 
ment which was meant to convey the infor- 
mation that the failure of the curb and the 
regular exchange houses was not serious, in 
so far as affecting the economic situation of 
the country. In another paragraph I spoke of 
the very bad effect these failures had in 
temporarily jolting the marketing of really 
good industrial securities in California and 
elsewhere. If these statements will be care- 
fully read by the reader it is my belief that 
any idea of contradiction will disappear, but 
lest I be again misapprehended, I wish to im- 
press upon the reader the same thought in an- 
other way. Standard security values were 
not at all, or very slightly, affected by the 
failures. Industrial stock sales and indeed 
the sales of any kinds of stocks were tem- 
porarily very seriously affected. 



The Medical Convention 

The convention of sawbones and medi- 
cine men was a great big success. Surely 
these wise men will spread the slogan that 
San Francisco KNOWS HOW TO DO IT. 
We are now beginning to get the overflow 
of the big musical meet at Los Angeles and 
the musicians, their families and their friends 
are arriving in the city. 

The National Educational Convention 

The convention of educators began in San 
Francisco this week on Monday. The edu- 
cators use the American flag only as a flag 
emblem and, as the convention is held in 
the week of the Fourth of July, the request 
is made that the flag be displayed every- 
where, during the stay of the learned men 
and women in the two cities. In addition to 
American teachers, over fifty countries have 
their delegates here in attendance — this 
means more than 200 foreign teachers. 



Just a Flurry 

And the markets are already recovering 
and Wall Street and California Street will 
not suffer permanently through the failures. 
The stock market atmosphere is cleansed of 
a great deal of potentiality for harm. It is 



Stanley Baldwin's Fear. 

Stanley Baldwin, the noted Britisher, is 
credited with the statement that our greatest 
peril is probably the danger of "getting rich 
too quickly." Baldwin is making a wild guess 
at the trouble with us, if there may be said 
to be such a thing as a general trouble, 
which is quite doubtful. We know there are 
many troubles, from which we should flee 
as from pests, but getting wealthy too quick- 
ly is not one of these. 



German Mercantile Marine 

There is a widespread misapprehension as 
to the German mercantile marine in this 
country. We are given figures showing the 
growth of the commercial fleets of Germany 
but most of the information we are receiv- 
ing is discounted in Germany, by people 
who have a right to a sane opinion about 
this expansion of German's sea going com- 
merce. The consensus of reliable informa- 
tion, from German authorities in ship build- 
ing and in commercial lines, is that those 
that are operating in various ports of the 
world, find that the war has served to re- 
place the old German carrying trade with 
vessels from other nations — nations that have 
expanded much more rapidly than the Ger- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 Itnitli Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



July 7, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



li 



y 



I" Knowing typefaces 

helps you to make 
your advertisements 
more effective. We 
are here to help you, 
for we know type- 
faces from A to Z. 

Let us help you plan 
your advertisements 
and set them up for 
you. Our Art and 
Copy Departments 
ThisAdver- are at your Service. 

t'isement set 
in 12 pt. Cas- 
lon bold face * . ■ , , . 

A telephone call — 
Karny 720 will bring 
a helper to your desk 
promptly. 

Overland Publishing Co. 

Independent Printers 

259 Minna Street San Francisco 

Ben G. Barnett, President 



Agua Caliente Springs 

The Fireproof Hotel in 
the Valley of the Moon 

Private baths. Swimming pool, tilled 
daily with hot sulphur water. No chem- 
icals used in this water. Golf course 
close to hotel. My motto — service, 
cleanliness and the best of table. If 
you want health and rest this is the 
place. Make reservation early. Address 
T. H. Corcoran, Prop., Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co. 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 



In a high Class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased al Lebolre tt smart Drag 
Stores. Phono Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 600 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy :2 95 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co. .. B80 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



mans have, as far as ocean carriers are con- 
cerned. Most of the German vessels are not 
carrying anything like capacity and some are 
losing money very rapidly. What will be the 
ultimate result, as far as the Germans are 
concerned, is being voiced in the opinion 
given that, eventually a great freight carrying 
war will be declared and that then it will 
be the Devil take the hindmost. But FIRST, 
Germany must build up its overseas com- 
merce. 



A Very Bad Policy 

It seemed after the war that Germany was 
en the right track and that it would not be 
long before she would again control her lost 
trade in South America, Africa, Asia and 
in Mexico. Germany sprang immediately to 
the front in all Latin countries and she found 
little or no difficulty along certain lises in 
pushing American goods right out of the mar- 
ket by low prices. Great Britain suffered to 
a still greater extent. In Argentina, Chile 
and a few other countries, Germany recov- 
ered her trade prestige immediately. Great 
Britain was also building up lost trade, she 
thoroughly covered every port with her 
steamships and she rebuilt her agencies for 
business everywhere. France showed a 
greater skill than ever before in capturing 
trade abroad. Belgium has made wonderful 
progress. After having lost a vast amount 
of business, which we could very easily have 
kept as our own. the United States got its 
second wind and our export merchants and 
manufacturers began to put up a real fight 
for commercial supremacy, or at least a 
good chance at trade, in most of the ports 
of the world. Despite these facts, Germany 
MIGHT have held its own and continued on 
a high tide of prosperity. But Germany did 
net hold its own. The German trade began 
falling away and it is still falling away. In 
Central American countries this is said to be 
due to the very bad pclicy of turning out 
machinery and merchandise that was not 
nearly equal in quality to what had been es- 
tablished as a German standard of excel- 
lence before the war. And so Germany is 
losing ground everywhere and this, in turn. 



is having its effect on the future expansion 
of her merchant marine. 



The Rates Are 
Reasonable 

at this 

Delightful 
Hotel 

DAILY 

One person, room with 

bath $3,50 

Two persons, room with 

bath $5.00 

One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY RATES 

< >ne person, room with 

bath _ $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $21.00 

Monthly rates are figured at 24 
days to the month. 

M ^^ M ^^ MM Bathing, tennis, 

., * golf, fishing, 

Q/i dancing, b o a t- 

cp i ng. Eu ropean 

Detter plan — dining 

^P/^z-o room In connec- 

rtace tion, C o m e by 

ta Gn" State Highway 
'Jf_ uy orS. 1'. open the 

•aaaaaaaaaananwjBaaaawji year rnuiltl. 

CASA 
DEL RKT 



Boyes Hot Springs 

(5 mib's from San Francisco — on the 
N. W P. R . R. 

Beautiful Now Golf Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths, Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools. Movies 

For particulars write 

R G l-H I1TENBERG. Boyes Springs. 

Or Pei k-Judah. 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



BLUE LAKES 

On a lake two mi s long. Many new 
improvements. Rowing, fishing, swim- 
ming, tennis '. dancing free to 
berries, fruit and 
milk produced on I remises. 
H. W. Kemp. Midlake P. O.. Lake Co. 



Feather River Inn 

Blairsden, Plumas County 
California's Ideal ^Mountain Resort 



OPEN JUNE 15th 

The Golf cmirse opened in 1921, is 
one of the best golf courses in 
California — 9 holes, 3050 yards. 
Fine i ens. Paul K. Con- 

rov. Golf Professional. Finest 
lake and stream trout fishing in 
the State. Horseback riding. Hik- 
ing, Motoring, Swimming. Bow- 
ling, Tennis. 

Excellent motor roads from all 
directions. 

For rates and reservations and il- 
lustrative folder, address 
W. W. BROWN 
Feather River Inn 
LJIairsden. Cal. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 



Pleasures Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Torn Moore, 



let, Paul Ash and his band, an amusing 
Felix cartoon and the news film complete 
Granada's program. 



Orpheum 

The two young men who are known in 
vaudeville a> Van and Schenck are popular 
to the extent of pandemonium. Their songs 
and their humor appeal to the audience in 
a way that can only express itself in pro- 
longed applause and demands for more. A 
large and varied repertoire embraces both 
the sentimental aTid the comic. Wellington 
Cross, a comedian of merit, has a playlet 
called "Wives," with which he entertains in 
an uncommonly delightful style. Eva Shirley 
and her own orchestra combine to make di- 
version with an excellent program. The 
genuinely funny man is always welcome, 
and in Harry Rose we find much originality 
of quip and quirk. Genevieve Butler, who 
has a pleasing soprano voice, and Leo Fland- 
ers, a pianist of ability, furnish a number 
that stands out prominently for its quality. 
"Circustown in Toyland" is an ingeniously 
constructed performance presented with ar- 
tistic effect by Miss Jewell. Bessie Brown- 
ing's songs are well selected and charming- 
ly rendered. The week's bill ends with the 
Trenelle Trio in a laughable concotion, "Mile. 

Fifi." 



California 

The Flapper went to see the big sea pic- 
ture at the California, and for reasons of her 
own, she took her young brother along. These 
two never think alike about anything and 
their impressions of Morgan Robertson's 
splendid story, "Masters of Men," are of 
course at variance. "Gee, it was great!" 
announces the Kid with enthusiasm. "Say, 
y" oughta see that naval battle in the Bay 
of Santiago. I wish Pop would let me go 
to sea." "Oh, that?" breathes the Flapper, 
with her superior air, "Yes, it is rather thrill- 
ing, but 1 do wish Cullen Landis would wear 



SAMFRAMC1SCO 



\V\ \ftuOEVVU-t 




I 



MA ™! ES 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Loges 



his hair thicker, and as for Wanda Hawley, 
she's always the same and not so good at 
that. Wishy-washy, I call her." They both 
seemed to enjoy the excitement and the dif- 
ferent sensational points of the play, and I 
suppose their personal pronouncements are 
as valuable criticism as most that one reads. 
The Kid voiced his delight in "Uneasy Feet" 
by Lloyd Hamilton, while the Flapper sighed 
sentimentally over Andrea Setaro's meaning- 
ful manners. That is her own word, and she 
knows its significance. 



Poriola 

"She Loves and Lives" does Norma Tal- 
madge, and so irresistable is she whilst thus 
engaged that one falls in love with her all 
over again. In fact, this is what happens 
every time one sees her. Not only as Miss 
Talmadge, the fatal charm that disarms crit- 
icism, but she is clever enough to always 
have a good play, and for this she is to be 
highly commended. Some motion pictures are 
not so good. Yes, decidedly not so good. 
We have all of us encountered the not-so- 
good kind of movies — in fact there are those 
of us who will tell you it is the most fre- 
quent kind to be met with. Norma Talmadge, 
however, can be counted upon to sidestep 
the poor ones. In the current comedy she 
has a fetching role and is so sweet and sin- 
cere and pretty that she quite reconciles 
one to the screen as a whole. With her 
are Conway Tearle, Octavia Brooke and Ida 
Darling, all contributing to the success of 
the piece. 



Tivoli 

The famous old Ellis Street theater seems 
to be settling into the fixed habit of double 
bills. But, just as surely as two negatives do 
not make a positive, two poor plays will not 
make a good program. "Your Friend of 
Mine" is one of those wild Wil'ard Mack 
things that are inexcusably flamboyant and 
false. Mack and Enid Bennett fail to make 
it acceptable, for all the careful selection 
of contrasting personalities that is obvious. 
Huntley Gordon, Herbert Frank and Rose- 
mary Theby are in the cast, but the play 
misses fire. The other twin in the Tivoli 
twosome is "Playing It Wild," with William 
Duncan and Edith Johnson. In it a cow- 
boy steps from his high estate into the depths 
of commonplace dullness, and becomes, — 
what do you think? An editor! His efforts 
to relieve the tedium of this lowly occupa- 
tion by activities reminiscent of his previous 
profession are what make the picture. 



Granada: "Woman With Four Faces" 

It is clever Betty Compson who is so gen- 
erously endowed in the matter of physiog- 
nomy, and she makes the following uses of 
them: First, she faces danger when she 
bcldly enters the boudoir of a famous opera 
singer and holds the lady up for her jewels. 
Then she faces the music, as the saying goes, 
when, in spite of her clever ruse of popping 
into bed and pretending to have been robbed, 
the hotel detective recognizes her and ar- 
rests her. Then she faces the jury and is 
acquitted. And of course she faces her fate 
when the good-looking young district at- 
torney comes along and asks her to devote 
her gifts to good ends instead of question- 
able ones. Richard Dix is the reformer who 
is determined to route a powerful drug smug- 
gling combine. With the help of the resource- 
ful Betty he succeeds. Many exciting events 
occur in the telling of the story on the screen. 
Boris Petroff and his elaborately staged bal- 




New 
orchestra 

RoseRoom 
Bowl 

Sparkling, up-to-date dance 

music. Otchestra undei the 

ditection of 

E.MAX BRABFIELB 

Dinner dances every eve- 
ning, except Sunday, from 
seven to one. No cover 
charge except Saturday. 
Cover charge Saturday eve- 
ning 50 cents. 

lie 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

dManagemenir 
HALSEY E.MANWARJNC 



July 7. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



Warfield Theater 

After an absence of three years during 
which they have enjoyed great popularity 
in vaudeville, Francis X. Bushman and Bev- 
erly Bayne have returned to the silent 
drama. They will be seen both in person 
and on the screen at Loew's Warfield Thea- 




Spacions dining rooms and 
commodious lobbies render 

Hotel Oakland 

an ideal place to meet 
and entertain your 
friends. Whether for 
luncheon, tea or din- 
ner, the service and 
cuisine will prove a 
delight to you. 

Dinner dunees every 

Saturday 

Special nttention given to 

all private functions 



JMKLA'l 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rpoms with Hot ami Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern (/.KILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 
NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements, official 
a. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $■( pel 6 > > and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE 11. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 
See IVck .Imlali or Orabtreee 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



ter for the week commencing July 7 in 
"Modern Marriage," presenting a fascinating 
story of modern marital relations. 

Bushman and Miss Bayne deserted the 
screen at the height of their popularity to 
accept an alluring offer from a big vaude- 
ville circuit. They return to motion pictures 
after a most successful season on the stage. 
In the Warfield engagement the co-stars will 
appear in person, supported by members of 
the original cast, enacting upon the stage 
one of the thrilling scenes from the picture. 
This is a decided novelty in screen and stage 
presentation. The film is so arranged that 
it can be stopped at the desired moment, 
permitting the players to take up the action 
without a break upon the stage. 

Lipschultz will conduct the augmented 
Warfield Music Masters in another splendid 
concert, blending the popular classics with 
the lighter favorite selections of the day. 
The usual short films are also on the screen 
program. Following "Modern Marriage," the 
Warfield will have the world premier of Bus- 
ter Keaton's first feature length comedy, 
"Three Ages," a sumptuous production pre- 
sented by Joseph M. Schenck. 



Miss Catt — Does she know Grace to speak 



to? 



Miss Nipp — No — only to talk about. 



It doesn't pay to be crooked — look at the 
corkscrews out of a job. — Chicago Phoenix. 



HOTEL PIA7A 

JAN FRANCISCO 




65c 

Luncheon 



Good food, nulet pleasant 
surroundings and carefu' 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 



Quality 1S66--56 Y/ears--1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllnrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo vT oodilde 

LaGrande & White'* 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard a: isom Streets 

San Franciuro rh<. ne Market 91* 

San Mateo Phone Sao Mateo 148S 

Eeoaomr DorablUty 



He kissed the parlor maid and the girl 
screamed. The wife came in and looked 
around suspiciously. 

"Fifi, why did you scream?" 

"Through joy, madam. The master has 
just doubled my wages." — Judge.. 



"You don't seem to have any love for the 
common people." 

"No. They're always shooting their fliv- 
vers into the parking places before I can 
get my big limousine backed in." — Detroit 
Free Press. 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



until September 15 
Good for return 

October Jl 
Liberal Stopoverc 

S ample round trip 

.Fares 




Chicago 1 8622 
Kansas City 72?s. 
Denver 64«s 
Houston 722 
NewYork. 14712 
Minneapolis 8722 
St. Louis 8132 
Omaha 7222 
New Orleans 85 S 
Boston 15352 

and marry others 

R D. Johnson, Div Pass. 
ABt., SOI Market St. Ph. 
Sutter "600: or Market 
St Ferry. Ph Sutter 7600 
San Francisco 

ickeast 

excursions 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 7, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave, 
Phone Franklin 6168 



NOTICE OP PUBMC SALE OF PER- 
SONAL PROPERTY 

Under Sections 1861, 1861a tind 18412, Civil Code 
of the State of California 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

Notice is hereby given that on Friday, 
August 10, 1923, at the hour of 12 o'clock 
M. of said day, in the baggage room of 
the premises of what is known as the Clift 
Hotel, situate at the South East corner of 
Geary and Taylor Streets in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, the undersigned will sell at public 
auction, tor cash in Gold Coin of the Unit- 
ed States, the following described personal 
property: 

1 "Wardrobe trunk (black) 40 inches high, in- 
itialed A. E. J. 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 44 inches high. 

1 Hat trunk (black) 26 inches high, initialed 
A. K. J. 

Contents of above trunks wearing apparel. 

1 Wooden box containing books. 

1 Large package containing articles of wear- 
ing apparel. 

7 Hat boxes containing hats. 

1 Suit Ijox containing clothing-. 

1 Shoe box containing shoes. 

1 Shoe box containing empty boxes. 

1 'ientieman's hat box containing various ar- 
ticles. 

1 Flower basket. 
being the property of Mrs. Carrie B. Johnston, 
Sacramento, California. The said auction and 
sale will be made under and by virtue of the 
provisions of Sections 1861, 1861a and 1862 of 
the Civil Code of the State of California for the 
purpose of satisfying the Hen of the under- 
signed on said personal property in the sum of 
$710.15, together with the costs of said sale, 
said Hen being an innkeeper's lien for the proper 
charges due from said Carrie B. Johnston for 
her accommodation, board and lodging and room 
rent, and for such extras as were furnished to 
her at her request and for moneys paid out for 
and advanced to her. 

Mated San Francisco. California. June 22, 1923. 
CLIFT HOTEL CO., 
By Frederick C. Clift. 
President and Managing Director. 
A.LBERT 1. LOISB, Attorney at Law. 
202-203 Crocker. Bldg.. San Francisco, Cal. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rules, 35c per day; 97.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




The Strength of Gasoline 

It is powerful liquid that drives raring 
cars so madly around the speedway. The fine 
stream of gasoline fed to these throbbing 
engines has stored up in it an amazing 
amount of energy, that needs only the spark 
of the ignition circuit for its release. 

The amount of heat energy produced by 
burning a gallon of gasoline is equivalent 
to work done in raising the enormous weight 
of 93,350,000 pounds— 46,765 tons or 1000 
carloads of coal — a vertical distance of one 
foot. Expressed in another way, it is equiv- 
alent to the work done in elevating a Chev- 
rolet touring car 10 miles vertically in the 
air, or propelling it a distance of 450 miles 
along a level, paved road at 20 miles per 
hour. 

It is interesting to think of gasoline in 
terms of tensile strength. We talk about 
the marvelous strength of heat-treated alloy 
steels, which is around 200,000 pounds per 
square inch. Now a gallon of gasoline spread 
out over a distance of 450 miles would make 
a very fine stream. In fact, it would be so 
small that 300 such streams laid side by side 
would make a band only one inch wide. 

But this hair-like thread of liquid contains 
the energy required to propel a 1 750-pound 
car along a level, paved road at 20 miles 
per hour. So the potential energy in this 
minute thread of gasoline is equivalent to a 
tensile strength of over 20 times that of the 
strongest steel, or more than 4,000,000 
pounds per square inch. 

Air Heroes Honor Rickenbacker 

Completing a seven-day non-stop run at 
San Diego, Calif., last week, a Rickenbacker 
touring car was piloted on the last 10 miles 
of its test by Lieutenants Kelly and Mc- 
Cready, army aviators who recently com- 
pleted the cross country non-stop airplane 
flight. This was done as a compliment to 
Captain E. V. Rickenbacker. 



Dick — Bob and his dame are having igni- 
tion difficulties, I see. 

Dock — What do you mean? 

"Sparking trouble." — Michigan Gargoyle. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 




LALAXXE 



J. BARRER] 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL. 

3i» New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BBRGEZ PRANK'S 

()LI.) PI m IDLE 1« »ii, 

415-127 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. in. 

AIhu A JLu Carte 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned witli 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1056 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



1140 Genry Street 



Tel. Franklin 3 OK 3 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetyleue Welding — Ulacktunltlilnff 

11. W. Culver \l, Daberer 12. Johnson 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In Sun Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Keurny 4086 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factury Rebuilt 

All Makes rjbntbd 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

506 Market St., San Fran. Phone Doug. 649 
308 12th St., Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



DIVIDKMI NOTICES 



THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS and LOAN SOCIETY 

(The Sun Francisco Bank) 
526 California si. (and branches). San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending June 30th. 1923, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
lour and one quarter (4V4) per cent per annum 
on all deposits, payable on and after July 2nd. 
1923. Dividends not called for are added to the 
deposit accunt and earn interest from July 
1st. 1923. Deposits made on or before July 10th, 
1923, will earn interest from Julv 1st, 1923 
A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO 
Market Street at Grant avenue. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1923, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after Monday, July 2, 1923. 
Dividends not called for are added to and bear 
the same rate of interest as the principal from 
Julv 1. 1923. Money deposited on or before July 
10. 1923, will earn interest from July 1. 1923. 
F. J. ERICKWEDEL, Cashier. 

THE FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK 
(Savings Department) 108 Sutter St. 
Fur the half-year ending June 30, 192 3, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after July 2. 1923. Dividends not called 
for are added to and bear the same rate of in- 
terest as the principal from, July 1, 1923. De- 
posits made on or before July 10, 1923, will 
earn interest from Julv 1. 1923. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 
Cor. Market. McAllister and Jones Sts. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1923, a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all deposits, payable 
on and after Monday. July 2, 1923. Dividends 
not drawn will be added to depositors' accounts, 
become a part thereof, and will earn dividends 
from July 1, 1923. Deposits made on or be- 
fore July 10, 1923, will earn interest from July 
1, 1923. 

J. O, TOBIN. Acting Secretary. 

F1U.SI KwPWltAL TKIIST I'liMI'A.W 
Cor. Post and Montgomery Sts. 
For the half-year ending June 30, 1923. a div- 
idend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after July 2. 192 3. Dividends 
not called for are added to deposit account and 
earn dividend from July 1, 1923. Deposits made 
on or before July 10, 1923. will earn interest 
from Julv 1, 1923. 

M. U. CLARK. Cashier. 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

S. B. Cor. Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

North Beach branch, cor. Columbus avenue and 

Broadway 

For the half-year ending June 30, 192::, a 

dividend has been declared at the rate of four 

(4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
payable on and after July ~. 1923. Dividends 
not called for will be added to the principal and 
bear the same rate Of interest from July 1, 1923. 
Deposits made on or before July 10, 1923. will 
earn interest from July I. 1923. 

A. E. SBARBORO, President. 

MKUt'AXTlLE TRUST COMPANY t >F 
CALIFORNIA 

Head office, 164 California St.. San Francisco; 
Savings Union Office, Market St. at Gram Ave 

and O'Farrell St.. and neighbor!) 1 offices 

throughout San Francisco, (Member Federal 
Resen e system |, 

For the half-year ending June 80, 1923, a 
dividend has been declared on savings deposits 
at the rate of four (I) per rent per annum, 
payable on and after Monday. July 2, 1923, A 
dividend not drawn will be added to the de- 
posit account, become s pari thereof, and am 
dividend from July I, 1923. Deposits mad 

or before July 10, 1923, will -■am Interest t'rom 
Julv 1. 1923. 

s, D. BECKLEY, Cashier, 

BANK OF ITALY 
Head office and all branches 
For the half-year ending June 80, 1928, ;» 
dividend has been declared al the rate of four 

(It per cent per annum on all saving! 

payable on and after Jul; Dh Idends 

nol called for are added to and bear the 
rate of Interest as the principal from July 1. 
1923. Deposits made to and including July 1". 
L923, Will earn interest from July 1. 

\ p GIANNI N'l, President. 



GANTNER & MA1SON 


FUNERAL 


DIRECTORS 


Chapel — TTl to 
Bet. IStta 


777 Valencia Street 
and 19th Sts. 


Telephone Market 


64 San Francisco 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Visitors in San Francisco Delight in the 
Gay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Dancing:, the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Tw«»nty-six Delicious Dishes, Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
IhenewHEXEON 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing Is only a part of tht« 
process. Many tilings can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not he as sound as you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for the ache. YYutHi your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster titan decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

•THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

riione Oarfleld 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crown*; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



VISIT 

11 M i S 

Catacombs" 



AT 



CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1. 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 60 Geary Street San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than geemi necessary" 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold In similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 18SG 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelnn Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Votary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Hume Kearny S91 San Francisco 




The Keaton Scientific Non-Skid 

Original Depression Type Protected by V. S. Patents 



New Broad - Flattened Tread 






No. 1. — T RACTIO X. Scoop- 
shape'd wiill formed by 55° angle 
side g r i> <> v <■ s and connecting: 
cross groove. This scoop-shaped 
wflll with square edge 
extends across the en- 
tire widtli of the tread 
and forms (It. 
e--t possible 




No. 2. — CENTRAL GKOOVE. 

Straight, square edges at 
right angle to road 
surface hold I In- car 
in a true course and 
effectively check any 
tendency to side slip. 



— Side grooves, 
at 55° angle 
I o center 
groove make 
side skidding 
practically im- 
possible. 



The Most Powerful Non-Skid Ever Devised 

Note the massive construction of the Keaton Non-Skid tread which insures long mileage. Observe the 
long unbroken gripping edges with perpendicular walls, scientifically arranged in the proper inter- 
relation and at the most effective angle. These are the principles of the Keaton Non-Skid and the 
reason for its powerful resistance against skidding and sliding. There is no hindrance to the tire 
rolling freely. 

KEATON TIRE & RUBBER CO. 

636 Van Ness Ave., Phone Prospect 324 
San Francisco Sales and Service Agencies 

Behrmann Kim and Tire Co., OIK Golden Gate Ave. .Mission Vulcanizing Work 

The Tire Exchange, 008 Golden Gate Ave. 
lie Luxe Garage, Hyde and Post Stu. 
Geo. S. Merwin Company, 1946 l'olk St. 



Oakland Rim & Tire Co., Oakland (2811 Broadway). 

Class A Garage, Stockton, 

1,1 Monte Garage, Orosl. 

A. L. Eriekson, Los Gatos. 

George Marks, Fresno (2009 S. Broadway). 

Kister ft Mitchell, Oroville (At the *'Y") 



Northern California Sales and Service Agencies 



399 Valencia St. 
Kegan Tire Company, 088 Turk St. 
Service Vulcanizing Works, 540 Van Ness Ave. 
Acme Auto Supplv, 891 Valencia St. 
Black ft White Tire Company, 4811 Geary St. 



Marshall Tire and Battery Service, Modesto. 
Marshall's Tire Shop, IVtaluma. 
Keuton Tire and Kim Agency, Keno, Nevada. 
Sweet Service Company, Holllster, Monterey, Salinas, 
Santa Cruz, Watsonvllle, Gllroy. 






. 



Established July 20, 185(1 



News 

4 W m w and 



■*>' 

s^ 



^1' 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



san FRANnsrn 



;an 



California Advertiser 



SATURDAY, JULY 14, 1923 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



LOS ANGELES 



t 




Country Home of E. %. -DimonJ, in ^Pctola Valley, Santa Clara County. California 



3 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

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Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 

—NOTICE— 

Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Mon tROin pry SI., he t ween 
Sutter and Bush Sts. 

Special Dinner on 
Sundays, $1.00 

Food excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining Room 

Prices Reasonable 

You are hound to be pleased when you 

cat at Tin; CLTJB I. KILL 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).._. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 




Established July 20, 1S56 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CHI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY. JULY 14, 1923 



No. 2 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $6.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit Action and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— The lady in the Slovene Parliament who advocated a compul- 
sory plurality of wives is unmarried. No wonder. 
* * * 

— Despite the cries of the politician the money saving for the 
tax-payer continues and the Governor has the thanks of the man 
who thinks. 

— Marin County should organize a Vigilance Committee in every 
town and the County authorities should lend every aid in suppress- 
ing gangsters. 

— President Harding has thawed out all the Alaskans and they 

have elected him the finest fellow who ever came to the Land of 

the Midnight Sun. 

.*£ if sf, 

— It is not possible for mere man to remember when climate was 
ever better than this. California certainly is dealing out its best 
brand in a long continued deal. 

— Some of this summer's bathing suits are decidedly one-piece. The 
piece is small, too. The precaution has been taken to make the piece 
of non-shrinkable stuff or else . 

* # * 

— Poincare has been once again endorsed by the French Parlia- 
ment. That makes it just a half dozen times. The old gentleman 
must be somewhat proud of his record. 

* * » 

— Congress may not now regulate the amount of whisky or alco- 
hol which may be prescribed by the physicians. It is a court de- 
cision. Watch the rush of "sick" men and women for permits. 

* ¥ * 

—It has been decided that a cat is not a domestic animal. And 
some hold the hen is not. Good decisions, both of them. Down with 
the cats and the hens. How well they seem to go together. Meow! 

* * * 

—In Highlands, New Jersey, a chick has been born with four 
legs. No one is able to account for the phenomenon except Annie 
Albertson. who says that she saw the mother of the chick being 
chased by a centipede one day. 



— Judging by the violence and the obscenity that is charged against 
the enforcing agents of the government in prohibition all of the 
missing liquor in the country must be used as a stimulus to duty. 

— City Attorney Brady has appointed Mrs. Meikle as his assist- 
ant. He says she will not prosecute but will act as a "sister to the 
unfortunate." Well, she is good-looking enough and anybody ought 
to be glad to have such a big sister as that. 

* * * 

— Those who call for slatue memorials, of men known only to the 
arts of peace, forget that the works of Washington and Bonaparte 
were greater in times of peace than of war. Napoleon left an im- 
pression on Europe in the arts and the sciences which has never 
been equalled by any other ruler. 

— There must be a scarcity of news in the papers when a land 
slide in Washington is accused of having red leanings and of hav- 
ing slid just as the train to which was attached the engine used 
to haul the Harding special passed the spot. They are going to 
have that land-slide arrested and deported. 

* * * 

— In London, the other day, a street orator lamented over the 
fact that some parts of this country were so wild that Indians ran 
around loose. That may be so, but we have not even a loose cigar 
store Indian in San Francisco and, as for looseness, it was not the 
Indian but the orator's tongue which was loose. 

* * * 

— Keeping cool by suggestion was illustrated in Paris, at an art 
dealer's shop, by the exhibition of a nude lady enjoying herself 
reclining on a cake of ice. No, Adolphus, it was not a real lady but 
a painting of one. The place was nearly wrecked by those who 
wanted to keep cool by suggestion. They had to call out the gend- 
armerie. 

* * * 

— And now some poor deluded wretch of a newspaper man sug- 
gests the control of the anthracite output in order to keep the price 
and the supply within the reach of the people. Wonder if that poor 
deluded wretch has forgotten the lessons of unlimited government 
control of everything during the war? And how the price's went 
up and NEVER came down! 

* * * 

— The hush that follows Hiram Johnson around in his Great 
Adventure in Europe and Elsewhere must be a presage to a coming 
storm. We will have to seek the cyclone cellar and drive the cattle 
to shelter when that Mighty Voice breaks over California again, 
from the Sierras to the Sea, from Eureka to San Diego. As soon 
as he nears the state we should wire and broadcast the storm sig- 
nals that all may be made safe and tight. Then, let her blow and 
blow some more. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 




The boy scout movement, apart from anything 
Value of the Boy else, has been effective in showing the community 

that there is a great service-potentiality in the boy 
of from ten to fifteen or sixteen, which has been overlooked almost 
entirely in modern city life. In farming, of course, that age in boys 
has been utilized in a hundred ways but the city-life left him to the 
mercy of the gang and of the streets. In San Francisco this week we 
have had an opportunity of seeing what really useful little men they 
can be and how polite and gentle they are capable of becoming. They 
have acted as ushers and in many capacities at the great National 
Educational Association meetings, they have been of simply incal- 
culable value as messenger boys and as guides to strangers from 
whom they have won the greatest praise. They are smart and active 
and reliable, what more can humans be? Across the water, in the 
land of their origin, they have become a recognized part of the public 
life and no pubilc affair is complete without them. But we are not 
using the girls of that age to the same extent and they are just as 
usable and should have a chance equally with the boys. The "Guides' 
in Britain, as the girl scouts are called, are just as important as the 
boys and play just as big a part in the national life. We must do 
more for the organization of our girls in that awkward age between 
childhood and maturity. 



To have lived to the age of almost eighty- 
Death of E. R. Taylor five ; to have been recognized as the head of 

two learned professions, as far apart as law 
and medicine; to have been a poet, and to have had the recognition 
of France for literary services during the war — this is almost as 
much honor as can fall to one man in one life. And in addition to all 
this to have taken an active part in the politics of one's city; to 
have been elected mayor at the time of great public peril and among 
the most disturbed conditions of civic life ; to have so conducted one's 
self during such a critical period that one's associates in the city gov- 
ernment gave a dinner in one's honor year after year, when no politi- 
cal hopes could have inspired the act and nothing but the desire to 
honor a man whom they respected could have instigated it! What 
more of life can one have than all this? There have been many kings 
and emperors who have had less, and who have deserved much less, 
for whatever may be our opinion of the politics of the late mayor, 
there is none but has the utmost respect for his learning and in- 
tegrity. No; one can trace the history of men and find nothing better 
and nothing finer than the record of Dr. Taylor and life has nothing 
stronger or finer to offer than it presented to him. 



Six out of seven auto trucks containing 
Rum Running Wholesale liquor smuggled in from Vancouver, B. C, 

escaped the other day in a hail of bullets 
rained on them from automatics carried by government prohibition 
men. One containing thirty-seven cases of whiskey was caught and 
the driver was, of course, charged with violation of the Act. For 
twenty miles the race continued with the government officials pouring 
in shot after shot from their automatics; the shotguns of a military 
pattern having failed fire. Is not this a most ridiculous picture and 
one which brings no credit either on the Act or on the government 
official enforcing it? One has to go back at least a hundred years 
'o match it. You may remember the burlesque of the customhouse 
men in the Ingoldsby Legends where "The firelight shines on Re- 



culver Cliff, and the answering light burns blue in the skiff," and all 
over paying the excise duty on the brandy that was being imported 
from France. It is the same thing all over again, producing the same 
sympathy with the smugglers and the same dimunition of the power 
and dignity of the government. For, it is not engaging to see the 
most powerful and wealthy government of modern times chasing a 
few gallons of whiskey for twenty miles and firing vain shots at the 
custodians thereof. It does not help to increase respect either for 
the government or for the officials. 



We have had comments now and again on 
The Course in the Ruhr the articles which we have printed on the 

Ruhr situation but the events are justifying 
the line which we have taken and there is no doubt that the grim 
termination of that adventure is looming more and more near and we 
fear more and more inevitable. The Pope is getting worried and on 
the one hand has approached France and on the other Germany. 
France has repulsed the good offices of the Vatican and a breach be- 
tween Paris and Rome is threatened. Germany has taken a stand 
against sabotage, but as the government never favored sabotage but 
only passive resistance, there has been nothing gained there. England 
and France are growing more close every day to the point of conflict, 
and the British business men are advising the government to go ahead 
and make separate terms with Germany, and everybody knows what 
that means in the long run. The French are getting no farther with 
their reparations collections and have practically given up the bluff 
that the invasion of the Rhur was a matter of reparations at all. Bit 
by bit the unemployment situation in Britain is getting out of hand, 
and all due to the state of affairs in the Rhur, and outlaw strikes are 
beginning to threaten the whole industrial structure. The invasion of 
the Rhur was one of the craziest adventures of modern times, and 
will go down in history as the' very denial of common sense. 



Dr. Jordan is a very able man and a most 
Dr. Jordan's Estimate sincere person. Sometimes he is sagacious 
and sometimes not; just as an elephant, 
which is supposedly sagacious all the time, but really can be very 
stupid. Not that Dr. Jordan is ever stupid, far be it from us to sug- 
gest the idea, but he occasionally gets off wrong and when he does, 
like Behemoth, his very bulk helps to get him farther into trouble. 
And what is all this about? Just this. Dr. Jordan says that we are 
the best educated people in the world and that our population is the 
most advanced anywhere, that where we read yellow papers other 
people can not read at all. Now that is not quite true, because we 
do not rank at the height of the educational scale and our literacy 
is not by any means the best; the Scandinavian countries are all 
ahead of us, not to mention greater countries still. But conceding all 
that, what does it amount to? Wells puts it, I think, fairly, — in 4 per 
cent the Europeans, meaning the great European countries have the 
better of us, in the next 60 per cent we have the better of them, and 
as for the rest we are about equal, which is giving us a little the 
advantage, for I don't think that there are eight millions of people 
in Europe of the social grade of our colored population. Now, that 
first 4 per cent we do not have. That is to say, in the very best, in 
the most highly developed, in the most supremely cultured types we 
are quite at a disadvantage. And it is just there, where the strain 
comes, that we lose out. It is just there, that Mr. Wilson fell down 
and that our diplomats are astray; that we are not able to gauge the 
future even, in industry so well; for instance, in the rubber indus- 
try, which we might just as easily have controlled with a little fore- 
sight. It is also on this 4 per cent that we fall down in literature and 
in art. It is always the extra good, the little shade between distinc- 
tion and mere ability that makes all the difference in the long run, 
where the competition is keen. 

We yield to no one in our admiration of the general type of our 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



countrymen. In hygiene and in general, all-round effectiveness there 
is none that can compare with them. Even our Babbitt, taking him 
by and large, is a better type than the European of the same class. 
But that 4 per cent must be made up. Unless we can make that up 
we are at an everlasting disadvantage, as anybody knows that has 
learned the eternal and unbridgable difference between "good" and 
"best." 



Our city can not grow without improve- 
A Committee on ment of the existing street car facilities. 

Street Car Transportation The advantages of good street car trans- 
portation in the upbuilding of a city is 
seen in the rapid growth of Los Angeles. In San Francisco we have 
a convincing example of the benefit of rapid, direct street car service 
in the upbuilding of the Richmond District and the sections west of 
Twin Peaks. Building in these districts is going on at a rate equalled 
in no other sections of San Francisco. 

From a standpoint of public interest, it is most gratifying to learn 
that the President of the Civic League of Improvement Clubs and 
Associations has deemed it fitting to appoint a Committee on Street 
Car Transportation, with a request that it investigate the status of the 
Municipal Railway and the advisability of increasing the Municipal 
System by the taking over of the privately owned lines. This Com- 
mittee is also to report the advantages to the taxpayer of taking 
over the privately owned lines while they are still in good operating 
condition and a going concern, rather than in waiting until the ex- 
piration of the franchises, which would necessitate the rebuilding of 
the entire system at that time at great expense. The Committee will 
report the dangers that would follow the expiration of these various 
franchises, expiring at different intervals over a term of years, result- 
ing in disrupted and disconnected service throughout the city. 

The personnel of this Committee are substantial men, well known 
in the community for their business ability, practical knowledge of 
civic conditions and their unselfish interest in San Francisco's wel- 
fare and growth. They are: Marshall Hale, J. H. Harbour, W. W. 
Watson, Thomas P. Robinson, Halsey Manwaring, Charles F. Phil- 
lips, R. M. J. Armstrong. 

The first thing to be done in street car improvement is the unify- 
ing of the two existing street car systems under city ownership and 
control. A unified system throughout the city with shorter and more 
direct routes and a universal transfer privilege will greatly facilitate 
the car travel in San Francisco. 



— Funny thing education after all! It so often comes down to 
the merest vulgarity. August Thomas, chairman of the World Con- 
ference on Education, which is a devil of a high sounding title and 
might have come from the proclamation of the tailors of Tooley 
Street, has to go out of his way to give his opinion on flirtation. 
What does he know about it and the relative values of French and 
American methods? Yet he claims authority and assures us of the 
permanency of the thing. What is the meaning of the sex yearn- 
ings of the teachers? To look at them one would not imagine them 
as shining in that capacity. Yet, supressions are queer things. It 
seems as if most of them should be psyched; but of course that 
would be at the public expense. What would Will C. Woods say 
to that? 



— Extensive advertising of California by the Southern Pacific 
Company is shown by an attractive booklet just issued by the Bu- 
reau of Information of Salt Lake City. The booklet, a copy of 
which was received here today, is in the nature of a tourist guide 
and will be distributed throughout the East. 



And now political archaeologists think they have unearthed . 
city elected official who never bethought him to become a citizen! 




By ANTISTHENES 

On the highway of life, popularity usually alights at the crossroads 
of success. 



As elections approach, the country seems to take on all the aspects 
of the land of promise. 



Well, if Ford gets there, he'll be the first president a few of us ever 
heard of prior to announcing his candidacy. 



The ex-kaiser's son is to run for president of Germany. The allies 
could wish him no worse luck than success. 



Mulcreavy must have very able assistants as the County Clerk's 
office seems well conducted during his absences. 



Wonder how many of the medicos favoring birth control would be 
with us today had it been in operation when they happened! 



Epictitus said: "Every place is safe to him who lives with justice,' 
but the sage had never tried to jay-walk across Market street. 



In commenting on the reception accorded them, visiting doctors in 
convention here recently bestowed praise on all — except the under- 
takers. 

Ford might astound the Union by quoting (anent conventions) 
what Epictitus said: "Mind neither parties nor pleaders but the cause 
itself." 



The California Medical Association is on record as favoring birth 
control. Well, there's nothing like providing more work for the 
medicos. 

Possibly the most vacationed employe in the city service: the polti- 
cally appointed so-called "Expert on minors' refund to the state" in 
the Auditor's office. 



The physicians' convention unveiled no tablet in honor of the 
Roman Caesar who once exclaimed: "The multitude of doctors hath 
killed the emperor." 



News item : "Judge McAfee's chances of election as district attor- 
ney are good: he is an intimate friend of Senator Johnson." No 
qualifications enumerated. 

One quality all the assorted scores who will run at the next elec- 
tion may possess: hope; for, the ancient, Thales, said of this: "They 
have it who have nothing else." 



During the National Educational Association convention some mil- 
lions of words have been used. How few, if any, treated of children's 
souls or morals — the basis of all education? 



It must be by divine right that government officials' salaries go on 
during their political campaigning*. But, maybe, they're able to 
whistle and eat meals simultaneously. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14. 1923 




doff, a clerk? We own, we can't, very successfully, and must sym- 
pathize with little Miss Hogg who startled a Washington pre-war 
diplomatic dinner by saying: "I couldn't marry a Russian! I'd choke 
trying to swallow his grand-daddy-long-legged, queer, funny old 



name. 

Brentano, $3. 



By KEM 

"No doubt a good wife is in many respects the greatest comfort to 
a fellow, bat a bad wife is the very devil, and the bother is you can 
never know which sort you have got until you have married her, 
and then it is too late." — W. B. Maxwell. 

THE DAY'S JOURNEY, by W. B. Maxwell, author of THE SPIN- 
STER OF THIS PARISH" which won such popularity last year, and 
of many other very notable novels, has again this season scored an- 
other success in THE DAY'S JOURNEY, which chronicles the life- 
long friendship of two very dissimilar but very human, modern Eng- 
lishmen. We are introduced to them first, at nearly their journey's 
end — the pink, rotund Carrinton Byrd and the thin, dark, sardonic 
Wilfred Heber, and then are whisked reminiscently to their boyhood, 
then young manhood. We like their very human quarreling and the 
"wonderful feeds" with which they celebrated their wordless recon- 
ciliations. We enjoy their combats of generosity over sharing living 
expenses together, and their resolve not to marry because of the 
risk of getting the wrong sort of a wife, and feel anticipatory fears 
over the likelihood of Eve and Satan disturbing their harmonious 
Eden. The thing we all fear comes upon us and Eve, in the person 
of Evelyn Glover, enters and for both of them she becomes at once 
"like life itself, the source of universal life without which other 
things can not go on living." Other women more insistent than 
Evelyn enter their horizon, but we will leave it to the author to tell 
you just how and which one got the wife that loved him too much 
and the one that got the one that loved too little, for it's a book to 
read and pass on to a friend. Enough to say the author's able crafts- 
manship keeps his theme in line with his foreword: 

"Is life then, no more than a day's journey?" 

"No more and no less." 

"But who shall be my companion for the day's journey?" 

"It does not matter. Chance will decide, and one may be as good 
as another, so that you both keep together till the journey's end." 
— Fables of An Eastern Land. 

Doubleday, Page & Co., $2. 

* * * 

MOSCOW ART THEATER SERIES OF RUSSIAN PLAYS, 

translated by Oliver M. Sayler, just published this spring, are of 
great interest to the dramatic-loving public. 

The first play is "Tsar Fyodor Ivanovitch" by Count Alexis Tol- 
stoy, cousin of Count Lyoff Tolstoy, and is a historical tragedy 
which reaches us here in our language for the first time, and was 
written originally in verse. 

This is followed by "The Lower Depths" by Maxim Gorky, which 
breathes the despondency and general hopelessness of the Russian 
poor. 

"The Cherry Orchard," "The Three Sisters" and "Uncle Vanya" 
by Anton Tchekhoff are illuminating cross-sections of Russian life, 
and the first two Tchekhoff plays have been generally pronounced 
to be the best plays produced by the Moscow Art Players. While ap- 
preciating the dramatic force and atmosphere of these productions 
one feels much is lost in the translating, especially the failure to sim- 
plify the names, for how can one concentrate on a play while trying 
to recall that the cast of characters in "The Cherry Orchard," for in- 
stance, tells us that "Boris Borisvitch Semonoff-Pishchik" is a land- 
owner and not to be confounded with Semyon Patelevitch Yepikho- 



REPORT OP CONDITION OP 

THE ANGLO & LONDON PARIS 
NATIONAL BANK 



OF SAN FRANCISCO 

Clone of BaHlness, June SO, 1023 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts % 58.313.275.08 

(J. S. Bonds and Certificates l ?"°°?'i5S'iS 

Bends and Securities 

Banking House 

Other Assets ■-■ 

Customers' Liability <>n Acceptances 

Commodity Drafts in Transit ....* 836.377.08 
cash and' Sight Exchange 20,350,087.15- 



[,480,267.63 
1.551.609.51 
1,136,340.96 
3,796,290.66 

21,186,461.83 



$106,336,406.84 
LIABILITIES 

Capita; Stock * 5,000. .on 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 3, 582.053. 16 

circulation Outstanding 3,958,600.00 

Rediscounts with Federal Reserve Bank li.318.HH3.28 

Bills Payable against Government Securities 5.350. ."" 

Acceptances Sold with Our Endorsement 336,928.52 

Bonds Borrowed 450.000.00 

Other Liabilities 111. 117.01 

Acceptances 3.796,290.66 

Deposits 74.07O.U24.21 



5106,335, 106.8 I 

Liabilities under Letters of Credit Issued, but not 

yet drawn against (6,918,421.16 

OFFICERS 
HERBERT FLE1SHHACKER, President 



Mortimer Fleishhacker. V-P. 
J. Friedlander. Vice-Pres. 
C. F. Hunt, Vice-Pres. 
Harry Coe. Vice-Pres. 
W. E. Wilcox. V-P., Cashier 
J. W. Lilienthal Jr.. V-Pres. 
Fred F. Ouer. Asst. V-Pres. 
Victor Klinker. Asst. V-Pres. 
J. S. Curran, Asst. V-Pres. 
J. W. Harrison, Asst. V-Pres. 



F. L. Moss. Asst. Cashier 



E. R. Alexander, Asst. V-Pres. 
Geo. A. Van Smith, Asst. V-P. 
Eugene Plunkett, Asst. V-P. 
L. L. Goodrich, Asst. V-Pres. 
John Gayle Anderton, Asst. 

Cashier and Secretary 
L. J. Aubert. Asst. Cashier 

F. J. Hoagland, Asst. Cashier 
V. R. Pentecost, Asst. Cash'er 
C. E. Baen, Asst. Cashier 




and tea from 3 to 5 



MARY HERETH CAROLINE JONES | 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2:30, 1 



I 



'*^L^ 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



THE HOME 

INaUKANCE COMPANY. 

NEW YORK 



"The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 



FIRE, AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL Pirn, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Ave. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 
239 Post Street 



PAUL ELDER'S 



San Francisco 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




HEi4RPIT? 



— Here is an actual incident which occurred at a country house- 
party. Amongst the guests was an old army general who prided him- 
self on being a brilliant card-player. During a game of bridge he was 
partnered by a youth and at the commencement the general said to 
him, "Now, my lad, do you understand the game?" "I'm not a bril- 
liant player," was the reply, "but I think I shall be all right." During 
the course of the game the youth revoked when spades were led. 
This brought forth the general's wrath, who said, "Hadn't you a 
spade?" and on receiving a reply in the affirmative, said, "Then why 
the devil didn't you make use of it?" The next day they were partners 
in a foursome at golf. The general was the first to drive off at the 
first tee, and churned up a big divot of turf, breaking his club in the 
process. The youth was very quick to get his own back, and said, 
"General, have you got a spade?" Taken right off his guard the 
old sportsman replied, "Yes." "Well, why the devil didn't you use 
it?" the youth fired out at him. 

— A certain major, returning very late to the training camp one 
dark night, was challenged by a zealous sentry doing his first bout 
of sentry go and proud of his responsibilities. The major found that 
he had forgotten the necessary password, so the enthusiastic sentry 
barred his way. "Don't be absurd, my man," said the major, in an- 
noyed tones, "you know me well enough. I'm Major ." 

"Afraid I can't let you pass without the word, sir," replied the sentry. 
"But, confound you man, I tell you I've forgotten it!" "Sorry, sir, 
not my fault, sir. Must have the password." "But, dash it, I tell you 

I'm Major 1" "Yes, sir, but it's strict orders as you know, sir. 

Must have the — " Then came a muffled voice from a nearby tent. 
"Oh, for 'eaven's sake, Bill, don't stand arguing all night. Shoot 
'im." 

* * * 

— The church of a certain village in Scotland was badly in need 
of repair, so one of its most popular members, by name Sandy Mc- 
Nab, was asked to collect subscriptions for this purpose. One day 
the minister came across Sandy walking irresolutely along the road, 
and at once tumbled to the cause. "Man, Sandy," he said, earnestly, 
"I'm sorry to see ye in this state." "Ah, weel, it's for the good o' the 
cause," replied Sandy, quite happily. "Ye see, meenister, it's a' 
through these subscheeptions. I've been down the glen collecting 
fun's, an' at every hoose they made me hae a wee drappie." "Every 
house! But — but — surely, Sandy, there are some of the kirk mem- 
bers who are teetotalers?" "Aye, there are," came the reply, "but I 
wrote tae those." 

— A portly old gentleman laden with a traveling rug and several 
bags was endeavoring to make a dignified exit from the crowded 
railway carriage. At the door, however, he stumbled and brought 
down his foot somewhat heavily on the pet corn of a brawny Scot. 
"Hoots, toots, man," groaned the latter, "canna ye look whaur ye're 
goin'? Hoot, man, hoot." After he had slammed the door behind 
him the over-burdened traveler put his head through the window, 
"Hoot yerself," he retorted. "I'm a traveler, not a motor car." 

* * * 

— A soldier was being tried for assaulting his sergeant. "Now. 
please lell us al once, without any prevarication." said the officer 
who was prosecuting, "did you or did you not strike the sergeant?' 
The prisoner was thoughtful for a few moments, then he turned to 
the officer and said, "Please, sir, the answer is in the infirmary." 



BABCOCKS 

RED 
BOOK 

of 

RULES 

f or 

Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 
(2nd Edition) 

The only recognized authority on Mali Jongg. 

Price $2.50 wherever Man Jongg is sold, or direct 
from us if your dealer cannot supply you. 

Cloth Bound Lithographed Cover. Its 117 pages are 
profuselyillustrated and contain what you want to know 

Mah Jongg Sales Company of America 

1270 Broadway, New York — 30 S. State St., Chicago 
36 Spear St., Snn Francisco 




Happy are the men 
who start tie day 



with- 




GEO. W. CA8WKLL 

Telt-ph.mf ! 
Sutivr »'■ I rirl )M 7 

1,800,000 rup« nn MPWd at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International f'.t position. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 



TownMLCrier 




Q WHO THE DEVILART THOU. 
.X'ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
wjv. E / P EWL ' SmwlT H YOU." 



— The minister from the Republic of Panama is here to investi- 
gate California's agricultural, or more strictly speaking, horticultural 
methods. To see him is to behold a most accomplished and delight- 
ful gentleman with an air of real distinction which is often found 
among Latin statesmen but all too seldom among our own. There 
is in their complete sophistication a charm which is more than ob- 
vious and yet less. For its complete grasp, one must be more or 
less of the sophisticated too, that is to say quite en rapport with 
the mental processes of this highly developed genus. This sophisti- 
cation to which I refer is one of the reasons for the charm of the 
European upper classes and particularly the upper classes of the 
Latin races. We wonder here occasionally why some of our most 
beautiful and accomplished women have married into that particu- 
lar class; but if is not hard to understand, after all. 



— According to a report from Berkeley there is a state law which 
compels all persons who are canvassing from house to house to have 
their finger prints taken for reference. That is rather a reflection 
upon the house to house canvasser and will deter many people from 
entering that form of earning a living. The numbers of these so- 
licitors may be guessed from the fact that two thousand are work- 
ing in and out of Berkeley every year. Of course they don't get 
their finger prints taken in anything like their full number, and that 
again reflects upon the stupidity of laws which are not executed 
and which, as a matter of fact, cannot well be executed. But only 
that fact of non-execution prevents the mass of us from becoming 
Prussianized. 



— And now we have a lady in the Dirstrict Attorney's office to 
look after the woman's court. It must be said that no better and 
more capable appointment could have been made that Dr. Meikle, 
who will shed a pleasurable influence at least on the surroundings, 
for she is the only woman attorney in an official position that im- 
presses one esthetically as well as intellectually. But why esthetically 
you ask? To which we reply "it all helps" and, as long as a wo- 
man is a woman, she had as well be a pleasing person. Of course 
the work in the woman's court is not at all conducive to the gaiety 
of nations but we have no doubt that Dr. Meikle will survive. 



— This gang business will have to be put down or we shall bring 
on ourselves the contempt of every civilized community. One gang 
almost seizes a ferry boat and tries to throw the captain overboard, 
and another actually has the nerve to make a concerted attack 
upon the dwelling house of some one against whom they have de- 
veloped an unexplained grudge. It would seem as if the thing could 
be stopped but our police sit supine or chase whisky. If sober 
hoodlums can do all this we had better return to the old days 
when they got drunk and were safely locked up till they had got 
rid of their superabundant malignity. 



— It is hard for husbands to be economical nowadays. A Mrs. Fur- 
kert here, after a row with her husband, attempted suicide by turn- 
ing on the gas. He obligingly turned it off with the pertinent re- 
mark that his gas bills were heavy enough without this additional 
strain on the exchequer. She has brought suit for divorce, and that 
is more expensive than if he had let her use the gas, as she pro- 
posed, and, the judge having taken the case under advisement, he 
is not even sure of getting rid of her. 



— Judge McAtee is going to run for office again and will not 
seek the position of District Attorney. This is very good news 
because Judge McAtee has brought quite a new tone to the police 
bench. Courteous and learned in the law, he has made his court 
a markedly efficient and yet liberal forum. As he modestly says, 
"Important public service can be rendered upon the police bench." 
There is no reason why the police bench should not be a credit 
to the community instead of the vulgar and frequently nasty thing 
that it is, for the most part. 



— The community property law is to be referred to the people. 
We have commented upon that law and the damage that it may 
do to business and the insecurity which its provisions introduce into 
all commercial dealings with married men. There is no doubt that 
it should receive more close attention than it has hitherto done 
from politicians who are too keen about votes to pay enough heed 
to the things which they enact. Save the women's rights by all 
means but do not jeopardize the entire financial structure of the 
state in trying to do so. 



— The Japs have good counsel or confoundedly long heads. They 
propose to knock the props out of recent legislation against them 
by making "cropping contracts." Cropping contracts imply an in- 
terest in the crop and that is not an interest in the land, as the 
courts have held, for crops are personalty and not realty. It is a 
very acute view of the situation and may save them yet. When 
the state comes, as it may, to interfere with personal property of 
alien residents, then the fat will be in the fire, for obviously any 
such legislation would go to the very heart of international trade. 



— The chronicled departure of one of our local young women 
for educational work in Guam recalls the time not so many years 
ago, as we older ones reckon time, when there was a regular stam- 
pede of women to teach in the Philippine possessions. The enthu- 
siasm passed, starting Professor Barrows, late president of the Uni- 
versity, well on the way to fame. But the tide of enthusiam for 
the occidental conquest of the Orient has gone and the young ladies 
no longer feel an urge to illuminate the Malay. And the latter is 
about the same thank you as before all the pother. 



WARNING 

to Hikers, Campers 
and All Other Persons 

Notice is hereby given that camping, hiking, fishing, hunting or 
otherwise being upon the property known as 



"Camp Taylor 



" or "Rodgers Ranch' 



Marin County, California, is without the permission of the owner of 
said property ; is forbidden and all persons camping, hiking, fishing, 
or otherwise being upon the said property are trespassers. 

The following railroad stations are located on the above property, 
to wit; Shafter Station. Camp Berkeley. Irving and Taylorsville. 
and all persons getting off the trains at these stations and leaving 
the stations become trespassers on the above property within the 
purview of this notice. 

That no person or persons have any right or authority whatsoever 
from the owner of said property to give permission or the privilege 
for a charge or fee to persons to hike, camp or otherwise be upon 
the said property. 

All persons hereafter found or being upon the said property, whether 
under authority of persons purporting to sell the privilege of camp- 
ing, hiking or' otherwise being upon the said property will be ar- 
rested as trespassers and dealt with according to law. 

ELIZABETH A. ROIMiKRS, Owner of Camp Taylor Property 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




•gsgg s SFSSI 



?K-~^3S5«S"~K'is\»lsgBH|g^^ 



I Who Win At Monte Carlo? 

1 1 

By R.BERKELEY | 



IN the — good or bad, as you please — old days, when men had 
not forgotten Adam's first care, (to clothe in becoming garb 
such of the fair sex as fortune — good or bad, as you please — had 
placed under his protection), thousands of little old Eves found 
themselves in middle age confronted with a position undeserved 
and tragical — little or nothing of the wherewithal to feed, much 
less cover those bodies that to all right thinking men are unceasing 
sources of delight. The provider had departed "address unknown" 
and "homes for decayed gentlewomen" (nice title that!) had al- 
ways a long waiting list. 

What became of them? Some were fortunate enough to be able 
to benefit by the liberal education it was, in those dear old days, part 
of a father's duty to provide (we do not have duties now, of the ful- 
filled variety) ; satisfying the cravings of the inner woman — through 
the sacrifice of whatever measure of dignity they were able to pre- 
serve in that long-ago — by acting as duennas, governesses, teachers 
of deportment, dancing, music, etc., to a rising generation of pre- 
doomed inefficients. Others were to be found occupying crumbling 
houses in out-of-the-way places, running "dame's schools," the schol- 
ars in which were untiringly regaled with stories of their unrespected 
teacher's former grandeur — I spent a purple year at one of these, 
a dent in my head (where the bump of respect should be) remind- 
ing me oftentimes of a wooden ruler wielded by my would-be in- 
structress. The lives of these were little else but long-drawn-out 
tragedies. 

But there were others, are some yet, of whom observers asked, 
"how does she do it?" They maintained fairly pretentious estab- 
lishments, presented a brave exterior to the world, yet were known 
to have been "left" but poorly provided for. Once a year, with un- 
failing regularity, they disappeared from their native haunts, re- 
turning always about the same time of year, none the worse for 
wear, improved in appearance, less thin; a new hat at least, some- 
times a new dress, suggesting a visit to some unknown hoard. 

My memory does not carry me back further than a quarter of a 
century, so of that period only can I speak, but 1 can tell you where 
you may get a clue to some of the mysterious disappearances and 
returns. You would never guess, so I will not waste time asking it 
of you. Those who can tell you more than I can, spend their lives 
handling evil-looking rakes (not the usual name, but it describes 
these tools well enough) in one of the loveliest spots on earth, the 
little Principality of Monaco. The croupiers at the tables at Monte 
Carlo know well enough these systematically successful "shabby- 
genteels," who — not the great venturers, as the newspapers tell us — 
always leave "Europe's gambling hell" richer than when they ar- 
rived. They are the artists, they are the players of the only safe 
system, quitting each day just at the stage at which they meant to. 
under conditions carefully calculated, conditions that always recur 
— though in variety numerous, in essentials the same. They take 
no great chances, never aim high, never allow losses to exceed 
definitely fixed sums. Their habits are in all respects as regular as 
the visits of a certain cat to my garden sleeping tent. You will 
never find them at the tables at the witching hour, when faces are 
flushed (Volstead wields no authority over Europe's earthly para- 
dises), when precious stones of fabulous price throw glad eyes at 
the electroliers. Virtue beds with those dear old ladies long before 
midnight, rises with them around 8 o'clock in the morning. Their 
dreams are undisturbed by high hopes or vain regrets, they repent 



nothing, aspire to no heights. A short toilet, a carefully chosen 
breakfast, precede their sortie to "business," (in the private or public 
salons — according to their means, or ideas of gentility), at an hour 
when countesses, South American millionaires, Mary Garden et 
filles, are sleeping the sleep of the satiated (with wealth). Delib- 
erately, they answer the "faites vos jeux" ; without a turn of the 
hair or the slightest quickening of the pulse, awaiting the verdict. 
The even chance or the combinations are the usual essay, for these 
are the safest and surest (as I know — finding them, personally, in- 
sufficiently exciting). They know how much they are prepared to 
lose, and they quit when it is -lost They have learned a far harder 
lesson, when to be satisfied with gains. The length of their stay 
in Monte Carlo is fixed by the amount they have set themselves to 
take away with them, over and above their hotel expenses — and 
one liqueur a day at the Cafe de Paris. 

These are they, and they alone, who diminish the piles won year 
by year from the great ones by the proprietors of the tables, who 
gladly pay toll to their lady-like visitors, their best advertisements, 
in a quiet way. 

I wonder if, at my next visit to the land of lure, I shall miss 
many familiar faces among these regular "patronesses of vice." Their 
wisdom I shall never learn. 



Civil service makes politics uninteresting. Favors beget fervors. 



What is 
aWatt? 




A watt is a unit of measurement, just as is a gal- 
lon, a pound or a yard. Suppose you used elec- 
tricity instead of water in your garden hose. You 
would then think of the current as amperes, and 
of the pressure as volts. The current (in amperes) 
multiplied by the pressure (in volts) gives the 
power in watts. 

One thousand watts for one hour equals one Kilo- 
watt Hour, which is the way you buy electricity. 

This advertisement is one in a series explaining such terms as 
watt, volt, ampere, etc. Read each advertisement carefully. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electricity it at easy to purchase as any ether 
household commodity. 



PG 




• and 



"PACIFIC SERVICE' 






10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 



If 
5 1 



g 



1 

I 

1 

S S 

I I 

a a 

SSSEgggggggggSi: 



| Visiting Royalty In San Francisco 









By A PIONEER 

ItaSSggggggSggaggSggggggSgg^gggggggSggggggggggggEggg® 



IT has often been claimed that San Fran- 
cisco was the most cosmopolitan city in 
America, though that title has been disputed 
by New York. In its earlier days it cer- 
tainly was, and it has at times been visited 
by all sorts and conditions of men. Royalties, 
notables in both political and civil life. Army 
and Navy heads of different nationalities. 
Nobility, Gentry, etc., etc. 

The first royalty that ever visited San 
Francisco was Queen Emma of the Sand- 
wich Islands, who arrived in October, 1866, 
on her way home from Europe and was the 
sensation of the hour. A good deal of fuss 
was made over her in the way of dinners, 
luncheons, church meetings; and calls with- 
out number were made on her by the cur- 
ious. Publically she was honored with a roy- 
al salute by the guns of Fort Point and Al- 
catraz the morning of her arrival, and a 
revenue cutter went out to the heads to meet 
the steamer which brought her from Pan- 
ama. General Halleck, then commander of 
the department of California, and staff, with 
the foreign consuls, called upon her in state, 
but otherwise she was not noticed "official- 
ly." It was said she complained that during 
- her stay in the city she had been treated 
by the public at large more like a wild beast 
than a human being, by the crowds that 
followed her when she appeared in public, 
particularly on her visit to the fair in aid 
of St. James' Church. Platts Hall was 
crowded to excess, word having gone forth 
that she would be present, and when the 
"beast" appeared a policeman was required 
to open the way for her through the crowd 
from whom might be heard such exclama- 
tions as, "Oh, look at her — There she goes — 
Why, the creature's white — She isn't a nig- 
ger, after all"; and so on and so forth, 
until she looked frightened to death. One 
could not help feeling sorry for the woman 
who appeared to be modest, quiet, and lady- 
like with a good deal of native dignity, al- 
though, her ancestors did eat Captain Cook, 
which some one said was the reason she 
claimed to have white blood in her veins. 
The Flag Ship "Vanderbilt" bore her away 
to her island home. Admiral Thatcher and 
officers giving a dance in her honor on board 
the ship the night before she sailed. 

Later on King Kalagaua made a visit of 
several weeks to San Francisco on his way 
back from a trip to Europe, chiefly France 
and England. He was what might be called 
a "big buck nigger." He was a fine looking 
man, tall, stout, and quite dignified in his 
bearing, and always well and appropriately 
dressed. In evening dress he wore the broad 
blue ribbon of some Hawaiian order across 
his breast. He met with a good deal of at- 



tention in a public way, and was entertained 
at a few houses but not very extensively. 

Don Pedro of Brazil, the last Emperor of 
Brazil, who thus held sway as such, was in 
San Francisco during the spring of 1876, 
for a short visit. He was very dark, rather 
heavily built, heavy lower jaw, and had a 
most peculiar cast of countenance. He was 
not bad looking, though his nose was al- 
most too flat to be considered a mark of 
beauty, and was always regarded as a cur- 
iosity the few times he appeared in public. 
He received some little notice of recognition 
from the authorities, but on the whole he 
was let severely alone. 













'* 


1^ 


. 



Princess Louise, 'who 'visited us in 1882 

Princess Louise and the Marquis of Lome 
passed through San Francisco in September, 
1882, en route to British Columbia. The 
British Cruiser "Comus," which came down 
from Esquimalt to meet and carry the Vice- 
Regal party to Victoria, had on its deck 
apartments built for their accommodation, 
the cabin for H. R. H. was draped in light 
blue cashmere and white lace — the seats of 
the chairs, the dressing table drapery, pin- 
cushions, etc., were of light blue satin beau- 
tifully embroidered in colored flosses for her 
by the ladies of Victoria — the place a little 
gem. Lord Lome's cabin on the other side 
of the deck was done in green and gold. 
The "Comus" was a beautiful little vessel, 
painted snow white, and the guns looked 
as if they were of black enamel mounted on 
gold, everything was so fresh and bright. 



Of course, San Franciscans were curious to 
see the Princess, and what she looked like. 
But to their disappointment she would not 
accept any invitations nor would she go any- 
where, one sole exception being to Fort Ma- 
son to take "five o'clock tea" with General 
McDowell, and this with the express pro- 
viso that no one should be asked to meet her. 
There was, however, one occasion in which 
the Princess Louise appeared in public, and 
this was the night of her arrival in San Fran- 
cisco. Christine Nillsen was to make her first 
appearance in opera at the Grand Opera 
House, for which the entire house had been 
sold out. When it was known that the semi- 
royal party wished to be present, a small 
private box was hastily erected on the left 
side of the stage for their accommodation. 
Some of the audience was inclined to be 
critical, inasmuch as when Nillsen appeared 
on the stage she was greeted with tumultous 
applause, but before she acknowledged it, 
she first made a deep and very elaborate 
curtsey to Her Royal Highness, almost turn- 
ing her back upon the audience in doing so. 

Another Viceroy had previously visited 
San Francisco in October, 1877, but this 
time he was not Royalty, save that he was 
then the representative of Queen Victoria as 
Governor General of Canada — the Earl of 
Duffern, accompanied by his Countess and 
quite a party of attaches. They were several 
days in San Francisco and Senator Sharon 
gave a grand ball in their honor at Bel- 
mont, that secluded little hamlet down the 
peninsula which has hardly changed since 
those early and romantic days. 

There were two young sprigs of royalty — 
if one may call them — who paid short visits 
to San Francisco, one French, the other Ital- 
ian. The Frenchman was Phillipe D'Orleans 
le Due de Penthieve, a grandson of Louis 
Phillipe, King of France. He was dark, tall 
and slight, by no means handsome, but "had 
an air" there was no mistaking, and spoke 
English perfectly well. He came from China 
en route home and during his stay in San 
Francisco was a good deal entertained. 
Among other things General McDowell 
turned out the troops for a review at the 
Presidio, followed by a garden party at 
Black Point, as Fort Mason was then called. 

The other Royal Highness was Prince 
Louis of Savoy, a cousin of the King of 
Italy, le Due de Abruzzi. He came to San 
Francisco as a Lieutenant on the Italian Man 
of War "Cristofer Colombo," and he, too, 
met with many attentions on shore. He was 
a handsomer man than de Penthieve, but 
more heavily built, and he loved dearly to 
talk of the explorations he had already made, 
and of these he hoped yet to make. 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



Feather River Inn 

Blairsden, Plumas County 
California's Ideal ^Mountain %ewrt 



OPEN JUNE 15th 

The Golf course opened in 1921, is 
one of the best golf courses in 
California — 9 holes, 3050 yards. 
Fine grass greens. Paul R. Con- 
roy, Golf Professional. Finest 
lake and stream trout fishing in 
the State. Horseback riding, Hik- 
ing, Motoring, Swimming, Bow- 
ling, Tennis. 

Excellent motor roads from all 
directions. 

For rates and reservations and il- 
lustrative folder, address 
W. W. BROWN 
Feather River Inn 
Blairsden, Cal. 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Flour. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements, official 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Hates. American 
plan. .$4 per (lay and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 
Make Reservations in Advance 

See Terk Jllilnll or <Yat>trecs 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYOKKHKA A BPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 24 33 



When the present Prince of Wales visited 
New York on his way home from Canada, 
it was hoped he might continue his trip to 
the Pacific Coast and give San Franciscans 
a chance to see what he looked like. He 
did not have time, though he expressed a 
great desire to do so, and it was said he in- 
timated he might come hither at some later 
date. 

So much for the royalty of other lands. 
We have none of our own in these United 
States, but in most foreign parts our presi- 
dents are regarded as crowned heads. Of 
presidents, ex-presidents, cabinet officers and 
other notables, quite a number have paid 
San Francisco visits at some time. Among 
them General Grant, Roosevelt, Harrison, 
Hayes and McKinley. The great war-secre- 




T)on Pedro II, Emperor of Brazil 

tary, Stanton, of civil war fame; Secretary 
of War Cameron, Secretary Delano of the 
Interor Department, Secretary John Hay, 
who came with the McKinley party; Admiral 
Farragut, Genera] Winfield Scott. General 
Sherman, Senator Colfax, for whom and for 
Admiral Farragut, who was here at the same 
time, William O. Ralston gave a large and 
brilliant reception at Belmont. There were 
others, but these were the most prominent. 
When President Harding comes he will add 
another to the list of presidents who have 
visited San Francisco while in office. 



Boyes Hot Springs 

45 miles from San Francisco — on the 

X. W. P. R . R. 

lteailliflll New (Jolf Cnursr 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing. Mineral Paths. Hot and Cold 

Swimming Tools. Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. UCHTKNBERG, Boyes Springs. 

Or Peck-Judah 672 Markei St . 

San Francisco, Cal. 



The Rates Are 
Reasonable 

at this 

Delightful 
Hotel 

DAILY 

One person, room with 

bath $3. GO 

Two persons, room with 

bath $5.00 

One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY RATES 

One person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $21.00 

Monthly rates are figured at 2 4 
days to the month. 

^^^^^ ^^^ m Bathing:, tennis. 

„ * golf, fishing. 

Qsi dancing, b o a t- 

CRatt ing ' European 

DtiCer plan — dining 

cp/ room in connec- 

rtace tion. Come by 

tn Cn" State Highway 

IV KJO op g p Qpen the 

hhmmhmmmih year round. 

CASA 

DEL RETT 

4*NTA C«^2 



Agua Caliente Springs 

The Fireproof Hotel in 
the Valley of the Moon 

Private baths. Swimming pool, filled 
daily with hot sulphur water. No chem- 
icals used in this water. Golf course 
close to hotel. My motto — service, 
cleanliness and the best of table. If 
you want health and rest this is the 
place. Make reservation early. Address 
T. H. Corcoran, Prop., Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In Snn Francisco 

56 Post Street. Near Market Street 

Plinne Kearny 45S6 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Mfali Served a la Carte. Also RefitUr 
French and Italian Pinner* 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 




BUSY CUPID 

NOWLAND-HOLMES — The engagement of Miss Elizabeth Now- 
land. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Nowland of Rich- 
mond. Va., and Beverly Holmes, son of Dr. and Mrs. T. B. 
Holmes of Oakland, has been announced. The marriage, 
which will take place August 1 at the home of Miss Now- 
land's grandmother, Mrs. Sarah A. Lyman of St. Helena, 
will be a very quiet one. Only the immediate members of the 
families will be present. Miss Nowland's father and brother, 
who are in the East, are leaving for California to be pres- 
ent at the ceremony. 

LUNCHEONS 

MeBRYDE — In honor of Dr. Garnett Cheney, who is leaving 
shortly for Europe, where he will continue his medical stud- 
ies, Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McBryde entertained at a luncheon 
Sunday at their home in Woodside. After the repast the 
party motored to the Menlo Country Club, where they en- 
joyed a plunge in the new swimming pool. 

KRASAK — Miss Margaret Krasak was the hostess on July 8 at 
a very attractive luncheon given in honor of Dr. B. Stepanek. 
Czecho-Slovak minister to the United States at Washington, 
and a world conference delegate to the recent convention. 
For the occasion the attractive Tally Ho room of Hotel Riche- 
lieu was used, decorated in red and white flowers, the Czecho- 
slovak colors. After luncheon Miss Krasak's guests retired 
to the ball room where they enjoyed an hour of Czecho-Slo- 
vak composition and folk songs played most artistically by 
Dr. Stephanek. who is an exceptional pianist. Mrs. Elmer M. 
Woodbury helped Miss Krasak receive. 

GRANT — Mrs. Joseph D. Grant gave a luncheon party Tuesday 
in honor of Mrs. Moseley Taylor. 

ST. FRANCIS — An attractive group of debutantes were lunch- 
ing together at the St. Francis Monday, including Miss Frances 
Ames, whose engagement to Mr. Gordon Johnson has been 
recently announced; Miss Adrienne Sharpe, Miss Josephine 
Drown and Miss Leonora Armsby. 

Mrs. Daniel Jackling had luncheon with her two nephews, 
the Messrs. Doubleday of New York, and Mrs. Thomas East- 
land. 

Another attractive group included: Mrs. Henry Foster Dut- 
ton, who has just returned from the East; Mrs. Walter Filer. 
Mrs. Samuel Knight, Mrs. Mountford Wilson, Mrs. Robert 
Hays Smith and Mrs. Augustus Taylor. 

BROWN — The Marin Golf and Country Club was the setting 
Friday of an attractive luncheon given by Mrs. Philip Foster 
Brown in honor of her aunts. Mrs. Edward Clark of Provi- 
dence, R. I., who is visiting in San Rafael from her home 
in the East, and Mrs. Addison Starr Keeler, a former resi- 
dent of San Rafael. 

DINNERS 

ROOS — Mr. and Mrs. Leon Roos celebrated their wedding anni- 
versary recently at Tahoe Tavern, Lake Tahoe, where they 
are spending the summer months. The celebration took the 
form of a supper party to which twenty friends were bidden. 

DORE — The birthday anniversary of Mrs. Elizabeth Dore in San 
Mateo was a family reunion, somewhat smaller than in the 
past and took the form of a dinner on Thursday at the home 
of Mrs. Ruby D. Bond, with whom Mrs. Dore makes her 
home. 

AMES — The first affair given in honor of Miss Frances Ames 
and Mr. Gordon Johnson since the announcement of their 
engagement, which was made July 4. was the dinner given 
on Saturday evening by Miss Lawton Filer. The dinner party 
was held at the Walter G. Filer home at Burlingame. 

CEBRIAN — In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Cornwallis-Stevenson 
(Cornelia Gwynni, whose marriage was an event of June 
and the first of the fashionable weddings of that month, Mr. 
and Mrs. Louis de Leveaga Cebrian entertained at a bridge- 
supper on Saturday evening. The affair was given at the 
home of the hosts in Sea Cliff. 

McNEAR — In celebration of the second anniversary of their mar- 
riage, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear entertained at a din- 
ner on Saturday evening at their home at Menlo Park. Their 
guests on the occasion included forty-five. 



SHUMAN — Mr. and Mrs. William Shuman gave a small dinner 
at their home in town on Monday evening, for Mrs. Moseley 
Taylor (Emily Pope) of Boston, who is visiting her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. George A. Pope, in Burlingame. 

SPRECKELS — Miss Eleanor Spreckels entertained at dinner at 
the Rudolph Spreckels' home in Burlingame Thursday night 
for Miss Frances Ames and her fiance, Gordon Johnson. 

CAMERON — Tuesday night Mr. and Mrs. George Cameron gave 
a dinner party at their home, bridge following. 

IX TOWN AND OUT 

HOWARD — Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Howard are enjoying a motor 
trip through the south. Last week they passed in Santa Bar- 
bara with Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Pringle, who have a house 
for the summer in that city. 
BALDWIN — Mr. and Mrs. A. Stuart Baldwin have returned to 
their home in Presidio Terrace after a visit in Goleta with 
their daughter. Mrs. Walter Scott Franklin, and Dr. Frank- 
lin, who are enjoying the summer at their ranch, 
de ROPP — Mr. and Mrs. Alfred de Ropp Jr. returned Monday to 
their home in this city after a visit in the southern part of 
the State. Mrs. de Ropp was for a fortnight the house guest 
of her brother's fiancee. Miss Olive Edrington, and Mr. de 
Ropp spent last week in Montecito with his parents, Baron 
and Baroness Alfred de Ropp. 
KKMPFF — Miss Cornelia Kempff, who passed the month of June 
in San Mateo with Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Driscoll, has re- 
turned to her home in Santa Barbara. 
WOLFF — Mr. and Mrs. George Wolff are spending this week 
in Ross, where they art- the house guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Bullard. 
HECKSCHER — A cordial welcome is being extended to Mr. and 
Mrs. G. Maurice Heckscher, who arrived Thursday in Cali- 
fornia after an absence of nearly two years. The Heckschers 
are in Santa Barbara, where they have taken the Hope ranch 
cottage on La Mesa. 
MADISON — Mr. and Mrs. Marshall Pierce Madison, who are 
spending the summer as the house guests of the latter's par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Perry Eyre at Menlo Park, entertained 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lewis Coleman Jr. over the week-end. 
McCANDLESS — Mrs. Howard McCandless and Mrs. Edward Jack- 
son have returned from a trip to Alaska. They are now at 
their homes in San Francisco. 
REDINGTOX— -Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Redington and their daugh- 
ters, Miss Mary Redington and Miss Margaret Redington, 
have gone to the Yosemite Valley for several weeks. When 
they conclude their stay in Yosemite they will go to Santa 
Barbara until fall. 
SELFRIDGE — Dr. and Mrs. Grant Selfridge have gone to Santa 

Barbara to spend the summer. 
PORTER — Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Porter (Frances Lent) returned 
to their home in Jackson street last Friday after a fortnight's 
visit at Del .Monte, where they were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Porter's mother. .Mrs. Eugene Lent. On Saturday they 
were the week-end guests of Mr. Porter's mother, Mrs. Wil- 
liam S. Porter, who is occupying Mrs. William Cluff's home 
for the summer. 
SCOTT — Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Irving Scott, Mr. and Mrs. Ger- 
ald Rathbone and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Eastland motored 
up to Tahoe last Friday,- where they passed the week-end as 
the house guests of Mr. and Mrs. George A. Newhall. Mr. 
and Mrs. Walter S. Martin and their daughters. Miss Mary and 
Miss Eleanor Martin, who are established at their summer 
home for a month or more at the lake, are entertaining Mrs. 
Eugene Murphy and Miss Gertrude Murphy. Mrs. Walter 
Filer and Miss Lawton Filer will be their guests this week. 
SMITH — .Mrs. Wiliam Henry Smith Jr. and her daughter, Miss 
Mary Dennis Searles. are spending the summer at Coronado. 
At present they are entertaining Miss Harriet Brownell. 
ROHNKR — Mrs. Frank Rohner has closed her home in San Fran- 
cisco and has gone to La Jolla, where she will visit her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Raymond Benjamin, and the latter's daughter, Miss 
Barbara Benjamin, for a month. 
WEEKS — Dr. and Mrs. Alanson Weeks are spending the month 
of July at Del Monte. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



FOLGER — Mr. and Mrs, Ernest Folger are enjoying a week at 
the Hotel Del Monte, where they are familiar figures on the 
golf links of the famous resort. 

WOODBURY — Mrs. Elmer M. Woodbury, with her little daugh- 
ter. Joan Woodbury, and Miss Marie Sandoy, are summering 
at Oak Knoll. Napa County. Oak Knoll is the country seat 
of Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Melone. Mrs. Melone is Mrs. Wood- 
bury's sister. 

BOCQUERAZ — Mr. and Mrs. Roger Bocqueraz and their two 
children have closed their home in Burlingame and have gone 
South to pass the month of July at Miramar. 

CROCKER — Mrs. Templeton Crocker and Miss Helen Crocker 
at Del Monte for the week. 

BOBB — Mrs. Eugene Laird Bobb is in Santa Barbara the guest 
of her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. T. Wilson Dib- 
blee. The latter part of this week she will leave for Los 
Alamos, where she will visit at the ranch of her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Lario Orena of Los Angeles. 

PEIXOTTO — Mrs. Edgar Peixotto and her daughter, Miss Nina 
Peixotto, returned to their home in this city last Friday after 
a several months' absence abroad. They went by way of the 
Mediterranean, visiting Egypt and other countries en route. 
They spent much time in Paris during their absence and 
while in London visited relatives of Mrs. Peixotto. They 
are at present at their country home on the Russian River 
and will return to town the middle of the week. 

DAVENPORT — Mr. and Mrs. Hewitt Davenport have closed their 
home in town and have moved to their country place on the 
Russian river, where they will remain until the early fall. 

PARK — Mr. and Mrs. Howard Park returned to their home in 
Burlingame Monday after spending a fortnight at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Park have been in the East for 
several weeks and came West with Mr. Park's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward H. Clark. The Clarks will remain here 
until about the first of September before returning to New 
York. While here Mr. and Mrs. Clark will spend much of 
the time vising with the Parks in Burlingame and as guests 
of their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Howard H. 
Clark Jr., at their new home in Hillsborough. 

TOBIN — Mr. and Mrs. Edward Tobin will join the summer col- 
ony in Santa Barbara around August 1. 

DEAN — Mrs. Walter Dean and her son, Mr. Edward Dean, are 
at El Encanto for several weeks and at the same hotel on 
the hill are Mr. and Mrs. Benno Hart, Mr. Benno Hart Jr. 
and Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Wylie (Constance Hart). 




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By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

THE "Ruggles of Red Gap" company with James Cruze as 
director, and a cast that sounded like halt the stars in Hol- 
lywood, arrived in San Francisco on the morning of the 
Fourth, spent the day here, and went on to Los Angeles that 
night. They had been in Eureka for ten days working on loca- 
tion, and seemed to have found it no bed of roses, for they all 
got to town tired, hungry, dirty, and unshaved, and very glad 
of the comforts of the Plaza Hotel. 



Jimmie Cruze is much in the public eye these days as he was 
the director of "The Covered Wagon," not yet seen in San Fran- 
cisco, but which is supposed to be the greatest outstanding picture 
of the year. Ernest Torrence, who also made his fame in that 
film, is leading man with the "Ruggles" outfit, and a most no- 
ticeable figure wherever he goes, on account of his great size, 
and unusual appearance. 

Max Graf, head of the Graf Productions, returned on Satur- 
day last from an extended trip to the East on business for the 
organization, and is already hard at work on preparations for 
his next production. The title of the next picture will be "Half- 
Dollar Bill." and it's a big sea story, to be made with an all 
star cast. Actual shooting will be begun in the very near future. 



Wayne Mack, big, good-natured production manager with the 
Pallas Film Corporation, is very ill with a general nervous break- 
down, at the Holland Hotel. 

Richard Tucker, well known leading man of both the silver 
sheet and the spoken stage, and who has just finished playing one 
of the outstanding roles in the production of "Cameo Ketby" 
at the Fox Studios, came to town last Thursday. While in San 
Francisco Mr. Tucker will be one of the all star cast appearing 
in the support of Marjorie Rambeau, Broadway star, in her spe- 
cial engagement at the Capitol Theater beginning July 15. The 
company will give first "The Goldfish." Miss Rambeau's last sea- 
son's success in New York, and after that a new play. "The 
Valley of Content." which, if it comes up to all expectations for 
it. will be her next season's vehicle. Lawrence Grant, also well 
known to the film world, and Holand Bottomly. are here, too, 
as part of the company. 

* * * 

The old junk-man's house that is part of the set at Hayes 
and Laguna streets for the (liming of "Creed.'' under the di- 
rection of Eric Von Strohelm, was the scene of a most sensa- 
tional murder last week. Dale Fuller, playing Maria, had her 
throat cul in a most realistic manner, and the on-lookers, the 
"remains," .mil the camera men got lots of thrills out of a 
wild ride to the Emergency Hospital in an ambulance. Under 
the circumstances Dale seems to lie bearing up very well, and 
having almost finished her part of the picture, expects to return 
to her home in Los Angeles next week. The picture as a whole 
is making most satisfactory progress. 
* * * 

.1 N. Qawane, location director for Norma Talmadge. and his 
wife spent last week in San Francisco on a little vacation trip. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Are., at Geary Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone (ntt.t (lit L'nder Management CARL S STANLEY 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 




By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money — HI. 

NO compilation of information on "cheap 
money" would be complete without a 
mention of the Rhode Island Paper Bank. 
Inasmuch as I gave, some time last year, 
a very complete history of this attempt by 
a state to base values on land, and to issue 
scrip based on this valuation, and showed 
how this action on the part of the state 
affected its standing and impoverished its 
people, I do not deem it necessary to give 
a very full description of the operation at 
this time. It is sufficient to state that, after 
the Revolutionary War, the people of Rhode 
Island found themselves face to face with 
dire poverty and that by 1 785 they turned 
to paper money for relief. In that year be- 
gan the call for the Paper Bank. The Gen- 
eral Assembly again and again rejected the 
pleas for the establishment of such a bank 
but in time a new party was started with 
paper money as its chief principle. This 
party won a surprising voctory in the elec- 
tions. One of the first acts of the new leg- 
islature was that of establishing a Paper- 
money Bank of one hundred thousand 
pounds. Every merchant or farmer who came 
to borrow money must pledge twice the value 
of the loan in land. It was provided that 
the money thus borrowed must be paid back 
into the treasury at the end of fourteen 
years. 



Paper Prosperity 

Many made haste to avail themselves of 
the opportunity to pay off their debts by 
pledging their land. They therefore mort- 
gaged lands, covered with stub cedars and 
rocks, for sums such as could not have been 
obtained for their richest pastures. When 
they came to making payments to the butch- 
er, the baker, and the candle stick maker, 
they found that a very heavy discount must 
be taken from the face value of this par- 
ticular kind of money. No one would take 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 BubIi Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 



this money at face value and as time wore 
on this discount became heavier and heavier. 
A forcing act was passed and everyone re- 
fusing to take the money at its face value 
was fined one hundred pounds and his rights 
as a freeman taken from him. This only 
made matters worse than ever. Merchants 
and others refused to make any sales what- 
ever and many closed their shops. Others 
began to barter goods against goods. Provi- 
dence and Newport presented a remarkable 
appearance with more than half the shops 
closed. Rents were paid in grain and in 
other commodities. The farmers retaliated 
on the merchants by refusing to bring their 
products to market. A famine was now im- 
minent. Well, it is a long story of stupidity 
and of ultimate failure of the worst. The 
Rhode Island Paper bank money was money 
based on a fluctuating value and this value 
descended with every issue of the currency 
until it became absolutely of no value what- 
ever. 



Drastic Laws 

Just give this matter thought — everyone 
was asked to take the oath in the most sol- 
emn manner to support the paper money 
and to take it at par. All persons refusing 
to take the oath were disfranchised. Ship 
captains were forbidden to enter or go out 
of ports of the state, lawyers were not al- 
lowed to practice, men were not allowed 
to vote, politicians not allowed to run for 
office, and members of the legislature were 
not allowed to take their seats until this won- 
derful oath was taken. The oath was of such 
a stringent nature that the General Assembly 
was afraid of taking the responsibility of en- 
acting it and referred it to the people. Only 
three towns voted in its favor. The General 
Assembly, in 1 787, formally repealed all of 
the forcing acts. That was the beginning 
of the end. The struggle to make money 
valuable by statute had had another illus- 
tration of the futility of such endeavors. No- 
body benefited by the operation except the 
State, which dishonestly refused to keep its 
obligations. Next week I will endeavor to 
give another example of the many lining the 
path of history as to cheap money. 



Industrial Growth 

No city may maintain its general growth 
if it gives little or no heed to attracting more 
and more industries to establish themselves 
in its limits. Industrial establishments mean 
population and population is wealth. No bet- 
ter population exists than that of the skilled 



worker and there is room in San Francisco 
for many more industrial establishments than 
are now here. The population of the state 
at large is growing very rapidly and the 
demands for manufactured products is in- 
creasing. Most of these products are such 
as are made in the Eastern states. Most of 
these products might be made just as cheap- 
ly right here. We want more factories. 



The Stock Markets 

There are a great many pecple who be- 
lieve that the recently bad conditions pre- 
vailing as to stocks is something that may be 
made more or less permanent. This is not 
true at all and there is even now visible 
quite an improvement. None of the so-called 
standard stocks have been affected and the 
incidental removal, by failure, of shaky brok- 
erage firms should be looked upon as a 
mighty good thing instead of being used by 
the calamity howlers to make what looks like 
a bad matter worse. 



The Goldfield Fire 

The fire at Goldfield is most probably a 
blessing in disguise. While it is true that 
many have suffered losses it may also be 



Grand 

Canyon 

Line 



h^/=E 



until September 15 
Good for return 

October 31 
Liberal Stopover; 

Sample round trip 

fares 

Chicago *8622 
Kansas City 72.12. 
Denver 64«s 
Houston 12,1s, 
NewYork. 147*2 
Minneapolis 8732 
St. Louis 81 S3 
Omaha 72S2 
New Orleans 85 !§ 
Boston 153a 

and many others 

R. D. Johnson, Div. Pass. 
Agt., 601 Market St. Ph. 
Sutter 7 600; or Market 
St. Ferry, Ph. Sutter 7600 
San Francisco 

:keast 

excursions 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



assumed that the old mining town will rise 
from the ashes a better place. The build- 
ings that will now go up will be of a much 
more permanent character and, just as it 
happened in San Francisco, the fire will, in 
time, be looked upon as having swept away 
much that was absolutely undesirable and 
a detriment to real growth. Goldfield is a 
very large factor in the mining world and 
its men and women are men and women 
of determination and grit. The outside world 
will look on with interest while they rebuild 
the town. 



The Export Business 

The export and import business of San 
Francisco is now improving. Export trade 
which has been practically dead for a long 
period of months began to revive about a 
month ago and now seems destined to again 
become a feature in trade life. I predict 
that it is only to be a short time before ex- 
port trade will boom. The trouble with the 
trade, as far as this country, and especially 
San Francisco, is concerned, is that the peo- 
ple who are in export trade are not temper- 
amentally and by means of education and 
experience flitted to carry on international 
barter. It is true that, in the past, some have 
made much money in export but these have 
not been exporters. They have been nearly 
always just plain everyday commodity gamb- 
lers. When normalcy exists the commodity 
gambler, as far as export or import is con- 
cerned, might as well go out of existence. 



two months, will advertise San Francisco as 
knowing how as well as reporting the fact 
that such a delightful climate and such 
whole-hearted hospitality exists nowhere else 
on earth. They'll tell the world! 



The Turks 

The Turks have evidently made their con- 
tentions good at Lausanne. Their represen- 
tatives will go home carrying the bacon. 
It is hoped that a sufficient guarantee of fu- 
ture good behavior will have been obtained 
and that we will not be faced in the im- 
mediate future with the old deviltries and 
substerfuges at Constantinople. 



Return of Tyson 

George H. Tyson, general agent of the 
Great American Insurance Company of New 
York and Phoenix Insurance Company of 
Hartford, has returned after a month's trip 
and a visit to the headquarters of his com- 
panies and reports business conditions as 
improving insurance-wise and losses not as 
heavy as in the early part of the year. While 
in New York he had a taste of hot weather 
on the other side of the continent and is more 
enthusiastic than ever for San Francisco cli- 
mate. 



Export Business Manners 

The export business is one in which small 
profits may be made and when an exporter 
has established his connections in this coun- 
try with the manufacturers, and these are 
reliable, and with his buyers abroad he may 
depend upon a long continuance of these re- 
lations. But the exporter who believes he 
can succeed in business without any know- 
ledge of the people to whom he is selling, 
socially and in a business way, is going to 
lose out in the long run. The exporter who 
thinks he may mould his buyer into Ameri- 
can manners and who adopts crude and rude 
ways with the Chinaman, the Japanese, the 
Indian, the Latin American, is also one of 
those who will be reckoned as having enter- 
ed a race knowing nothing at all as to how 
to win it. The world at large is not going 
to change customers and courtesies dictated 
to it by centuries of practice because an 
American exporter does not and will not un- 
derstand these ways. 



Business Is Very Good 

That is the report everywhere. It is espe- 
cially good in San Francisco. We have never 
had so many strangers here. Now we have so 
many gatherings and conventions it is a very 
difficult task to keep track of them. These 
meetings, of national bodies, in San Fran- 
cisco are good things to keep up. We can 
take care of three of four of them a day. 
Certainly the conventions of representative 
men and women, gathering here in the last 



rt lm tm mt 

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Cane* ttgkl fact 



AVhyPay 

^ Excess 
a Postage? 



2)0 YOU REALIZE 

that 90% of the letters that leave 
your office could carry additional 
selling helps which would in- 
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Make every postage stamp you 
buy do hs full duty by your busi- 
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bearing your return card should 
be a salesman tor you! 



Small folders, little booklets, at- 
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the best advantage, will bring in 
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OVERLAND PUBLISHING COMPANY 

INDEPENDENT P POINTERS SAN TRANCISCO 

<W7iS9.HinnaSt C&u> na Karny jlofM 



BEN C BARRETT. rrr.H.^i 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 



LEISURES WW 




OBEv NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

1dm Moore, 



Margaret Anglin 

Oscar Wilde's "A Woman of No Impor- 
tance" is a conversational tour de force. It 
is replete with caustically witty sayings and 
when you sit through a performance and 
most of this is lost to you on account of bad 
accoustic qualities of the theater or the fact 
that the management of the company per- 
forming has not recognized that only two or 
three of the voices of the company reached 
any farther back than the seventeenth row 
of seats, clearly enough to be understood, 
is enough to make you feel rather angry. 
All week this has been the complaint of the 
patrons of the Curran. 

The company presenting the play is one 
that leaves little to be complained about. 
It is an evenly balanced performance and 
the stage surroundings fit the play very well 
indeed. Miss Anglin is a great artist, she 
has a use of the hands which helps her in 
any part taken — they speak eloquently as to 
what are her emotions, at any time. Lady 
Hunstanton, Emelie Melville, is a part, taken 
by that estimable and beloved actress in a 
way leaving nothing at all to be wished for. 
A most difficult part is that of Gerald Ar- 
buthnot, Allen Connor, and Mr. Connor does 
justice to it as few men could. The Alice 
of Salley Williams, is a sweet and winsome 
thing and would have been much appreciated 
except for the fact that her voice does not 
carry at all. I hope the management will 
take this mild adverse critique in good part 
as it may serve to give us something the 
entire audience may hear and enjoy next 
week, when Miss Anglin plays a double part 
in "The Great Lady Deadlock." If the ac- 
coustic qualities of a theater are bad it is 
a thing very easily cured by having thu ac- 
tresses and actors exert themselves a little 
to make themselves heard by all the patrons. 
Better station some one of the company out 



SAM f RAHC1SCO 



\W NAUOtmU-E- 




I 



MA ™ 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to 91.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted in Dress Circle 
and Logea 



in the audience on the first night and get 
the range. 

The music incidental to the play was re- 
markably well chosen and was played in a 
masterly fashion. 



Orpheum 

Richard Kean, with his unusual person- 
ality, his rare good looks and his rich, reso- 
nate voice, is at the Orpheum this week, 
with a brief and brilliant repertoire that in- 
cludes impersonations of "Shylock," "Peter 
the Miser" and "Uriah Heep." He does some 
strikingly clever acting in each of the roles 
selected. Van and Schenck in songs and 
song-recitations continue their popular act, 
and win enthusiastic applause with "My Hum 
Town," "Yes, I Have No Bananas," and a 
score of other musical hits. Schenck is good 
in every known dialect, and Van's casual 
way with the piano is unique. Eva Shirley, 
in "Songs of the Moment" is assisted by 
Adler's orchestra and Al Roth's dancing. 
The amusing patter of Jack Osterman, the 
slick lad from Broadway, contains many new 
jokes and a few old ones, all received laugh- 
ingly by his admirers. The elaborate revue 
of Anatol Friedland is called "Anatol's Af- 
fairs of 1923" and consists of five beauti- 
fully staged "affairs" with pretty girls and 
a group of his own songs. "Youth and 




Spacious fllnlng moms and 
commodious lobbies render 

Hotel Oakland 

an ideal place to meet 
and entertain your 
friends. Whether for 
luncheon, tea or din- 
ner, the service and 
cuisine will prove a 
delight to you. 

Dinner dances every 
Saturday 

Special attention given to 
all private functions 



m O T EJjgSISSL 

RKLA'jW 

r-W C JurQeivs M(ii.- «1 I V/ 



Beauty" goes with spirit in the capable hands 
of Edward Lambert and Minnie Fish. Ray- 
Bone leads the Orpheum orchestra in Johnny 
Tucker's jolly piece, "Maggie." 



Tivoli 

Oscar, the elephant, occupies the center 
of attention on the Tivoli screen and makes 
a noble hero. In the photoplay, "The Soul of 
the Beast," with vivacious Madge Bellamy, 
this big acting elephant performs many en- 
tertaining tricks and seems to enjoy saving 
the heroine, punishing the villian, rocking 
the baby's hammock and displaying jealousy 
of the man in love with his mistress. "See- 
ing's Believing" is the comedy in which Viola 
Dana appears and does some vivacious act- 
ing. It has rather an ingenious plot, well 
carried out. A good news film is also shown. 



California 

The play now at the California will please 
the crankiest critic that ever carped. Agnes 
Ayers in "The Heart Raider," with Mahlon 
Hamilton, large and handsome as the lover 
pursued, and Charles Ruggles, comedian par 
excellence, as the lover pursuing, gives a 
delightful impersonation of a pretty, dare- 
devil young spoilt darling, that surprises one. 
The play is full of action of a really spirited 
sort, and of charming scenes at Palm Beach 
and along the picturesque Florida coast. 
Quite the most enjoyable motion picture seen 
in San Francisco this season. Miss Ayres has 




Qy{ospitality hv 



hole- 
he?rted interest in 



one s guests. 

Tea in the Palm Court com- 
bined with the enjoyment 
of the new tea concerts 
under the direction of 
Cy Trobbe insures for the 
discriminating hostess un- 
usual satisfaction. 

— Afternoon Tea, JQ cents 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

cManagement 
HALSEY L.MANWARJNO 



July 14, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



taken a keen sense of humor hitherto un- 
suspected and looks very lovely in the part 
of Muriel Gray, an athletic and fearless flap- 
per. To Charles Ruggles all honor and glory 
and laughter for the funniest thing he has 
ever done! Reginald Denny appears in an- 
other "Leather Pusher" play, and an attrac- 
tive picture-dance act, "Jack Frost and the 
Snowflake," with Easter and Hazelton, 
pleases the audience. 



the success of the play, and their performance 
in " Topsy and Eva" will be reviewed in our 
next issue. 



menoi Ostrow," by Rubenstein," for their 
overture number. The usual Warfield short 
subjects are also on the program. 



Granada 

"The Spider and the Rose," with Alice 
Lake and Gaston Glass, holds Granada's 
packed houses enthralled by its beauty and 
interest. The scenes are laid in old Cali- 
fornia and are romantic in the extreme. In 
the cast are Noah Beery, Robert McKim 
and Louis Fazendo, also Edwin Stevens of 
beloved memory. Excitement runs rampant, 
pretty love scenes occur frequently and the 
settings show California in one of the most 
seductive periods of her history. Boris Pet- 
roff presents a ballet called "Argentine 
Nights" with artistic effect, and Paul Ash 
is going strong in a musical extravaganza. 



Alcazar 

The much talked-of and elaborately pre- 
pared musical play of the Duncan Sisters 
opened at the Alcazar this week and is mak- 
ing good all the promises of its forecasters. 
The popularity of these gifted girls assures 




Quality 1866--66 Years-1922 QuanlltT 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

IturllnEame Redwood CUT Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Krancleco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 14S8 

Economy DurnblUtx 



Warfield Theater 

San Francisco will have the world pre- 
mier of Buster Keaton's first feature length 
comedy, "Three Ages," which will be the 
attraction at the Warfield Theater for the 
week commencing July 14. This date also 
marks the beginning of the engagement of 
the Colorado Cowboy Band, an innovation 
in syncopation, with Colonel House direct- 
ing the jazz-playing rangers. "Three Ages," 
Keaton's first comedy on the Metro Pictures 
program, is presented by Joseph M. Schency. 
It is a burlesque on civilization, with Kea- 
tion as the central comic figure. Throughout 
all the ages the same two men — Buster Kea- 
ton and Wallace Beery — are fighting for the 
same girl, whose part is played by Margaret 
Leahy, a new-comer to the screen, who was 
the winner of a notable beauty contest held 
recently in England. Accompanying the 
screen production of "Three Ages," the War- 
field program includes a stage presentation 
of "Dances of Three Ages." Lipschultz and 
the Warfield Music Masters will play "Ka- 



NEW PRESIDENT ELECTED 

The California Association of Hair Dress- 
ers and Cosmeticians, has elected its new 
officers for the new term, as follows: 

President, Mrs. A. F. Cosgrove; Vice Pres., 
Mrs. Nera Needham; Sect'y, Mrs. M. Jef- 
ferson; Treasurer, Mrs. M. Morrill. This As- 
sociation keeps up actively with all new and 
scientific processes that tend toward the 
beautifying of the human face and hair. 



First Loafer — I hear all the men have 
gone on a strike. 

Second Loafer — What have they struck 
for? 

"Shorter hours." 

"Luck to 'em. I alius did say that sixty 
minutes was too long for an hour." — Pitt 
Panther. 



"Are you master in your own home?' 

"I certainly am!" 

"Wife's away on a visit, eh?" 




ompass 
Points 
NORTH 

To California's Vacationland 

Follow the direction of the compass and 
travel north from San Francisco to the recre- 
ation realm along the line of the Northwest- 
ern Pacific Railroad. 

Cool coastland breezes will refresh you— 
and the ever-living Redwoods will impart to 
you some of their vitality and repose. The 
Russian River, Eel River, Clear Lake, the 
mineral springs, and diverse scenic attrac- 
tions will make memorable your vacation in 
California's great Northwest. 

Tickets, information and illustrated travel booklets at 
San Francisco ticket offices, Ferry Building and 50 Post 
Street; or -write J. J. Geary, General Passenger Agent, 
64 ^Pine Street, San Francisco. 

I NORTHWESTERN PACIFIC f 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 14, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Nes* Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Goaffh 

Telephone Park 271 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



el. Fniiikllii 8fiH. r » 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobile* 

Oxy-Aeetylene Welding — RlaukrtmltliliiK 

II. W. Culver M. Daberer E. JoIiiinoii 



SecoND speeDS 



Must Stop Before Crossing R. R. Tracks 

Impetus to the Careful Crossing campaign 
now being carried on by the railroads will 
be given in California after August 31 when 
the new California Motor Vehicle Act 
passed by the last legislature becomes ef- 
fective. The new law provides that opera- 
tors of all motor vehicles carrying passengers 
for hire, school buses and motor trucks car- 
rying explosives or inflammables, must come 
to a complete slop before crossing the tracks 
of any steam railroad or of any interurban 
or suburban electric railway. 

These provisions of the act are included 
in Section 135, and a penalty of a fine of 
not exceeding $500 or of imprisonment for 
not exceeding six months or both is provided 
for violations of the section. 

Operators of the vehicles mentioned in the 
section must bring their machines to a stop 
within not less than ten feet nor more than 
50 feet from the nearest rail of the track 
being approached, and then look and listen 
for approaching trains. 



Neill Comes to Coast 

H. A. Neill, supervisor of branches of Gen- 
eral Motors Truck Co., has been made man- 
ager of the San Francisco branch, succeed- 
ing H. P. Smith, who died a short while 
ago. 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 



Telephone Market 64 



San Francisco 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 



AH Makes 



SOM> 

ki:nthi> 

KKr.AlltlCI) 



See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

506 .Market St., San Fran. Plume Doug. 649 
308 12th St., Oakland Flione Oakland 2764 



Wv 




Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell StB. 



LALA.VN'B 



J. BARRKRI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

5 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A SL 25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. in. 

Also A La Carte 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation Is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 

BEST SERVES US 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 



In :i high class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboire & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 580 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 

Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PER- 
SONAL PROPERTY 

Under Sections 1861, 1861a and 1862, Civil Code 
of the State of California 

TO WHOM IT HAY CONCERN: 

Notice is hereby given that on Friday, 
August 10, 1923, at the hour of 12 o'clock 
M. of said day, in the baggage room of 
the premises of what is known as the Clift 
Hotel, situate at the South East corner of 
Geary and Taylor Streets in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, the undersigned will sell at public 
auction, for cash in Gold Coin of the Unit- 
ed States, the following described personal 
property: 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 40 inches high, in- 
itialed A. E. J. 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 44 inches high. 

1 Hat trunk (black) 26 inches high, initialed 
A. 10. J. 

Contents <>f above trunks wearing apparel. 

1 Wooden box containing books. 

1 Large package containing articles of wear- 
ing apparel, 

7 Hat boxes containing hats. 

1 Suit box containing clothing. 

1 Shoe box containing shoes. 

1 Shoe bnx containing empty boxes. 

l Gentleman's hat box containing various ar- 
ticles, 

1 Flower basket. 
being the properly of Mrs, Carrie B. Johnston, 
Sacramento, California. The said auction and 
sale will lie made under and bj virtue of the 
provisions of Sections 1861, L861a and 1862 of 
tile *'i\i] Code of the Stale of California for the 

purpose of satisfying the lien of the under- 
signed on said personal property in the sum of 

$710.16, together with the costs of said sale, 

said lien being an innkeeper's lien for ilu- proper 
charges due from said Carrie B. Johnston foe 
her accommodation, board and lodging and room 

rent, and for such extras ;is were furnished to 

her at her request and for moneys paid out for 
and adva need to her, 

Dated San Francisco, California, Jum- 22, 192:*. 
CUPT HOTEL Co.. 
By Frederick C. Clift. 
President and Managing Director. 

ALBERT 1. L013B, Attorn. •> at Law. 

202-203 Crocker, Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




1 'l.u't ice limited to 


KYK 


EAR, NOSE AM> THROAT 


Hours 

Satunla \ 


in to ;. — By Appointment — 
10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Bemoved to Sulfa r>87 Uehes Bide. 




II', TOST STBEET 
S«n Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

JmiUm Pressi«d bj Hand, Only — 
Suit* CftllMl for and delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parfariaa Dyeing »ml Cleaning 
OS Mama Bt. Phone rmnklin Mio 



WE SPECIALIZE IN 

PERMANENT 
WA VING 

8 Curls for $5.00 



AT 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 
San Francisco 

Est. 27 Years Kearny 2842 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




me ^ 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some (lilnk that a vijroroii* brn-.li i ng once 
ur twice a tiny Is taking very irood care 
of tli em. Km-hiiii; i-. only a part of the 
process. Many thine** <*»" happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist ran 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be a* Nound as you iniHRlnp. 
A toothache means Iron hie ; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and cum*. 
There are cum trouble* that will destroy 
teeth raster than decay. Are your teeth 
sort-? l>o your jrum* bleed? Call In today 
ami talk It over. It will co*t nothing 1 . My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAX FRANCISCO 

Phone '.arfleld 835 

s.ri ( I \i ISTS — Extraetlonej Crown*; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



VISIT 



"The 

Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
CEMETERY 

City Office: 

995 Market St. 

San Francisco 

PHONES: SUTTER 695 

DOUGLAS 4772 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 66 Geary Street San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than n renin necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or, if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1855 
37-46 First Street - - San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Pholan Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
I*1ione Kearny 391 San Francisco 




STATEMENT 

OF THE CONDITION AND VALUE OF THK ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 






HIBERNIA BANK 
Dated San FranciBCO, .func 30, 1923 



ASSETS 

1 — Bonds of (he United States ($11,949,900.00), of the State of Cali- 
fornia and the Counties, Cities and School Districts thereof 
($21,887,049,101, of the State of New York ($2,149,000.00), 
of the City of New York ($1,139,000.00), of the State of Ne- 
vada ($100,000.00), of the State of Oregon $(51,000,00), of 
the County of Lane. Or. ($200,000.00), of the County of 
Bergen, N. J. ($160,000.00), of the County of Douglas, Or. 
i $147,000.00), of the County of Jackson, Or. ($84,000.00), of 
the County of Clackamas, Or. ($73,950.00), of the City of 
Cleveland, Ohio ($105,000.00), of the City of St. Paul, Minn. 
($100,000.00), of the City of Jersey City, N. J. ($50,000.00), 
of the City of Portland, Or. .'$50,000.00), of the City of Day- 
ton. Ohio ($25,000.00), the actual value of which is ....$38,209,815.06 

2 — Miscellaneous Bonds comprising Steam Railway Bonds ($1,218,- 
000.00 1. Street Railway Bonds ($994,000.00), Quasi-Puhlic 
Corporation Bonds ($3,836,000.00), the actual value of which 
is 5,710,519.75 

3 — Cash on Hand 3,144,214.27 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 31,030,326.53 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said 
Corporation, and the payment thereof is secured by First Mort- 
gages on Real Estate within this State, and the States of Ore- 
gon, Nevada, Washington and t'tah. 

5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is 402,621.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by 
said Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, and the 
payment thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds and other se- 
curities 

6 — (a) Real Estate situate in the City and County of San Francisco 
($342,814.31), and in the Counties of San Mateo ($1.00). Mon- 
terey ($63,291.93), and San Luis Obispo ($91,078.63), in this 

State, the actual value of which is 497,185.87 

(b) The Land and Building in which said Corporation keeps its 

said office, the actual value of which is 948,940.06 

TOTAL ASSETS $79,043,622.54 

LIABILITIES 

1 — Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual value 

of which is - - $75,488,087.01 

2 — Reserve Fund 4.455.535.53 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $79,943,622.54 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY. 

By E. J. TOBIN. President. 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, 
By J. O. TOBIN, Acting Secretary. 

STATE OF CALIFORNIA, | 

City and County of San Francisco, ( ss ' 

E. J. TOBIN and J. O. TOBIN. being each duly sworn, each for himself says: 
That said E. .1. TOBIN is President and that said J. O. TOBIN is Acting Secretary of 
THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, 
and that the foregoing statement is true. 

E. J. TOBIN. President. 

J. O. TOBIN. Acting Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 2d day of July, 1923. 

CHAS. T. STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 





■ 




Established Jul) 

W AND 4 


20, 1 


856 












V » f ./ « 






^—J 


1 " '^r 

$5.00 PER YEAF 


i 


PR 


ICE 


10 CENT 


" California Advertise* 



SAN FRANCISCO 




SATURDAY, JULY 21, 19 




OS ANGELES 



^XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXvXXXXXXXxXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXSXXXXXXXXN 




Kissel !>peedsc«r 



Try a fteet mile or two in the Kissel 
Speedster. 

You'll then know why it has had so 
many ambitious imitators in the years 
since we originated this type of car. 
And you'll see why no one has yet 
caught just the sweep of line that 
makes its grace and beauty so allur- 
ing to lovers of fine cars. 



Come in and learn, too, that its com- 
bined speed, power, comfort and road- 
ability have not even yet been dupli- 
cated in any other car. 




AL G. FAULKNER, Inc. 

1521-1527 VAN NESS AVENUE. Prospect 366 
W. C. MORSE. Oakland Dealer, 4270 Broadway 




XxVXVXXNNNVVX>XXXVNVNNXXX>VNXN\VXVVVXXXVXNNVNX>X%N>NX>NVXNN>VXXXNNXVxS>NN>NXX>\NNNNNNNN>< 



it 



Compensation 



Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Hajflhland Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4^4) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Reserve Now Your Bonds 

For Reinvestment of July Funds 



Open 8 a. m. to I I p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



Not one day's interest need be lost in 
reinvestment or purchasing securities 
with money that is soon available. 



You may choose your investment and 
make your reservation with us now 
for the day on which your funds are 
ready. 
Let Us Send You Our List for July Investment 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



San Francisco 
Sansome Street 



Oakland 

709 Syndicate 

Bldg. 



Los Angeles 

203 Baltlett 

Bldg. 



New York 
Wall Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 

Faid Up Capital $15,000,000 S15.000.000 Ee»rrc Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



£att JTnmrtotf QUpronirU 

Leading Newspaper of the Pacific Coast 

A Newspaper made every day 

TO SPEAK TO 

Every member of every family 

Order at once the Daily and Sunday Chronicle, delivered for $1.15 a month- 
including Sunday editions 
Write to The Chronicle or tell your nearest newsdealer or postmaster 



— NOTICE- 



Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Montgomery St., between 
Batter and BuhI. Sta. 

Special Dinner on 
Sundays. $1.00 

Pood excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining Room 

Prices Reasonable 

You are bountl to be pleased when you 

eat at THE (LIB GRILL 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. SI. 75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



FL^/L' m * /! »— «»*il»— ■ +*+Jb> • m i 



Established July 20. 1056 




^a T®m© 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 21, 1923 



No. 3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $6.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 : Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit Action and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— "I don't mind working," said the old mountaineer whom we 
met this summer; "but I do hate a whistle!" So say we, all of us. 

— Now that it is the fashion to sit and walk erect, the flapper 
regrets no doubt that she ever fell into the way of the "debutante 
slouch." 

— John D. gives a nickel birthday party, in lieu of the dimes 
he has bestowed heretofore. Apparently John has found it necessary 
to economize. 

— Some writer said (we think it was Charles Lamb) : "To be 
wroth with one we love, doth work like madness on the brain! 
Sounds extravagant, but haven't you all felt like that, when you 
were "at outs" with your Beloved? 

¥ ¥ * 

— Naturally, it would take a German to analyse kisses; it is an 

obsession with this nationality to measure or weigh everything from 

flea bites to human emotions. And most appropriate in this case, 

that the German's name is Schmack! 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

--Our prophesy some weeks ago regarding the Chinese banditry 

affair, has come about. Witness the film pictures at Warfield's week 

before last, some of the participants being only concerned, we are 

told, with the vanished creases of their trousers. 
¥ ¥ ¥ 

— The S. P. C. A. takes a pet dog away from an aged woman in 
New York last week; the woman in question having been ejected 
from her dwelling place by realty firms. Too bad there is no so- 
ciety for the Prevention of Cruelty to Humans! 
¥ * ¥ 

— "Isn't it awful in Russia!" exclaimed someone who has been 
reading books on Russia lately. "Farmers have burned whole fields 
of grain because of the low price offered for their crops!" What 
about crops thrown into the Sacramento River every year, to keep 
prices up? 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

-Something from out of the rest of the nonsensical untruths in 
the columns of the Chronicle devoted to "What San Francisco 
thinks of Los Angeles," and vice \ersa. proves food for thought: 
"Among the charms of San Francisco are the monuments she has 
erected to slrangers of un-recognized genius whom she allowed to 
sit starving in her parks." 



— The "Daily Express" of England is of the opinion that 
French friendship is more important than German markets, and that 
is the choice, however regrettable the necessity, which ought to be 
made by the British government. 

— While the Dean of Bristol says : "Surely the time has 
come to tell the French people that, while towards them we remain 
as friendly as ever, with the short-sighted violence of their gov- 
ernment we can have no further truck; not because it is hurting 
our pockets, but because, although we may not talk of them, we 
do still value our souls!" Alack-a-day! Isn't it all bewildering? 

— We pass every morning a big pile of wood labeled "Free 
Wood," in front of an apartment house in course of construction. 
Instead of diminishing, this pile seems to be increasing. Possibly, 
no one on Nob Hill is in need of wood; or doubtless they all burn 
electricity or gas; but doesn't it seem as if a thing is generally "free" 
when there is no demand for it? 

— We have been having some sultry days lately, and full-leafed 
summer is at its zenith. But sometimes on the warmest days, a 
little whistling wind dashes along the street, runs ahead of us, and 
calls back over its shoulder: "Autumn sent me to remind you that 
nothing lasts; so make the most of today!" 

— Vegetable and fruit vendors along the Peninsula highway offer 
their wares to the passers-by as being "just picked" from some 
neighboring ranch, and therefore doubly inviting; but they do not 
comply with the law in regards to packing. Invariably the large 
products are on top, and the bottom of the box is filled with small 
and inferior fruits or vegetables. The solicited traveler should watch 
out for this. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Tumbling down, tumbling down is all the superstructure erected 
by the Johnsonians when they were in power. Under the strong 
destructive blows of the new economic system, introduced by the 
governor, all the hamper of the progressives is being thrown over- 
board and the boat will be able to ride clear of interference. The 
last and most artificial of the reform schemes, the State Market 
Board, is going into the discard. All the better. Free competition 
is the solution of trading problems, not state interference. 

¥ ¥ ¥ 

— Terribly fierce are some of our editors and one of the local 
ones the other day grew quite angry over the Ruhr business. We 
are not in the fighting game very much and don't appreciate that 
the constant moving of chessmen continually alters the complexion 
of the game. Hence it is rather foolish to have international heroes 
ind villains. The enemy you fought yesterday may be a friend to- 
mcrrow. Hence to put yourself on a pedestal and declare that the 
pponent of yesterday is a scoundrel, won't do. It makes the wise 
laugh. Mr. Editor; less heat and more light. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 




may not be worth while; but a glance at the faces of the eclesias- 
tics, poets and philosophers shows that it exists. 



At last the crisis has been reached in the Ruhr 
England Intervenes matter and the British premier has spoken in 

no measured tones, for, underneath the icy 
politeness of the phrases, is a note of deep feeling, which perhaps 
can only be understood by the folk of his own race. If the French 
government is misled by the apparent formality of the declaration 
it has only itself to blame. Goaded by the constant attacks of the 
business men who are suffering from a cessation of trade owing to 
the poverty of their best customer; worried by the unemployment 
which is eating like a cancer into the very vitals of the British 
people and which is caused by the same dislocation of trade; hu- 
miliated by the crass arrogance of the French who have piled in- 
dignity upon indignity on their late ally and who take steps of 
the most vital importance to European peace without even con- 
sulting the power which stood side by side with them in the trenches, 
the British government has at last belted itself and is prepared to 
look the future firmly in the face even if it means war. "The 
French must get out of the Ruhr" is the message which has gone 
from parliament to Paris among the cheers of all parties and with 
the vehement approval of the Labor Party which is the most im- 
portant opposition party and which, with its control of the labor fac- 
tor, is the most important party in war. The French must get out 
of the Ruhr; everything else is subsidiary to that. The British will 
help them get reparations, will help to make Germany pay such 
sums as can be gotten from her, but the first and most essential 
thing is that the French must get out of the Ruhr. So has the 
prime minister said and so it will be, whether easily or with great 
suffering; whether peace is maintained or civilization goes stag- 
gering down into the abyss from which it may not emerge for cen- 
turies. No decision of greater import has been made in modern 
times; for this is more grave even than 1914, as the consequences 
are so much more vast and terrible. And we are privileged out here 
so far from the conflict, to watch the palpitations of the peoples 
under the new threat. But we must recognize that whatever may be 
the outcome of this struggle, remote as we are, its effects will be 
written indelibly into our own history. 



There must be quite a number of our readers, 
A Nice Distinction at least of middle age, who remember Andrew 

Lang. He was a writer of much delight and 
contributed verses of the most delicate humor and essays of quaint 
and whimsical quality. From all points of view he was a great 
success and from his own a somewhat mitigated failure, for he had 
wished to be a great poet and would in all probability have suc- 
ceeded had the time of his publication not been inappropriate. All 
this is, however, preliminary to the main fact, which is that his 
widow, who has recently published a collection of his works, quotes 
a saying of his about himself to the effect that he "was gay in mind 
and sad in soul." This is the case with many more people than 
one would imagine, and springs from the essential distinction be- 
tween the superficial and the profound. One may be gay about 
little things that come along and on which can be exercised the 
little play and quirk of the mind. But the great things, those that 
lie like fishes in the bottom of the pool and which are not disturbed 
save by the casting of shadow or the disturbance of the water, these 
are of their essence sobering, and produce that sadness which has 
all through the ages been the mark of the profound thinker. It 



It is a good thing that the president has 
The President in Alaska made that trip to our far northern domin- 
ions in order that he may see for himself 
the condition of things there and the sufferings which the people 
of that district have so quietly and soberly endured. All through 
the war and ever since, they have been afflicted. The scourage of 
the influenza struck them as it struck hardly anywhere else. The 
relief ships reported whole villages in which inhabitants were dead 
and none to bury them. The deflection of capital to other and 
more immediately lucrative centers of investment has paralysed in- 
dustry. The remoteness of the district from the ventilation of the 
press, which bad as it is, is yet a liberating instrument, has caused 
the perpetration of those wrongs which the strong are always likely 
to inflict upon the weak, unless some hand restrains them. All these 
things combined have brought a self-restraint and somewhat sen- 
sitive people to the point where they are actually suffering. It is 
well that we should have among them a man of the kindness of 
heart and sweetness of disposition of our chief executive. He will 
see what is required and will no doubt bring his influence to bear 
in order to save the stricken inhabitants of a district which will be, 
at some time in the not remote future, a center of great wealth 
and a reservoir for the rest of our wide domain. 



We have a change in our school system 
The New Superintendent due to the reorganization contemplated 
of Schools by Charter Amendment No. 37, which 

the Commonwealth Club was chiefly in- 
strumental in pushing to success. The old system, involving the po- 
litical election of a superintendent, has been abolished. This is sat- 
isfactory, in that it eliminates from the school system the taint of 
local politics and gives us a chance to obtain the services of a strong 
man from the outside who may come in and carry on the affairs 
of the educational system without embarrassing obligations which 
are attached to any political system. Insofar as we can judge, a 
very good selection has been made in the person of Joseph M. 
Gwinn, the new superintendent. He has been superintendent of 
schools at New Orleans for a long time, ever since 1910, and his 
record there is of the highest. His statement to the Commonwealth 
Club was entirely satisfactory and left nothing to be desired. He 
seems to have definite ideas and to have the ability to realize them. 
For many reasons the school situation here is a little more compli- 
cated than in most places, but that is more due to the viciousness 
of local politics than to anything inherent in the school situation 
itself, which will undoubtedly clear up under the control of a far- 
sighted and sagacious person like Mr. Gwinn. At all events we wish 
him good fortune and a clear field. 



Last week we called attention to the decision 
The Japanese whereby it was held that the Japanese may 

and the Land Again make contracts for crops without having that 

interest in land which brings them under the 
law prohibiting them from having interest in real property. This 
week there is another decision, delivered, it is true, by the Superior 
Court at Los Angeles, whereby Japanese are entitled to lease land 
in California for other than commercial purposes. This was a case 
decided against the State of California which was plaintiff in the 
action against two Japanese defendants. The defendants had leased 
a piece of land near Fort MacArthur on San Pedro Bay for the pur- 
pose of running a sanatorium for Japanese, and the court held 
that they were within their rights. It has been held so long that 
it is common law that a lease for years or at will is a chattel real. 






July 21. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



that is to say it is personalty and not realty, and so does not imply 
an interest in real property such as is contemplated under the act 
limiting Japanese ownership. It is not apparent whether the act in 
itself contemplated interference with the rights of Japanese to hold 
such an interest in land as this for other than agricultural purposes. 
At any rate the aliens do not seem ready to succumb without a 
struggle. 



The hew development in convict labor appears to 
Convict Labor be making headway and seems to have justified 
and Narcotics itself to the authorities, at least sufficiently to be 

employed on a large scale. The idea is to pay a 
maximum wage of $2.50 which will, in the present state of wages 
of unskilled labor, be highly profitable to the state and will give 
the prisoners a chance to save some money so that they may better 
meet the world when their term is up and and their debt to society 
has been paid. Between this system and the old and wasteful one 
of keeping the prisoners in idleness to their own detriment and at 
the expense of the state there can be no comparison, except such 
as is greatly to the advantage of the new. But the question of nar- 
cotics creeps in and the state is already beginning to discover that 
it will have to make a great effort to keep these drugs away from 
the camps on the highway in which the convict laborers work. It 
is very difficult even with the most stringent care to keep the drugs 
out of the prisons and it will be much harder perhaps to keep them 
away from the camps. This drug tendency is one of the most threat- 
ening of modern perils and not even the yellow press can overplay 
its real significance. Of course it means a new post of superintendent 
of camps, but we cannot escaps the politicians. 



Before prohibition came to us THE DEMON RUM 
Poor Old Hootch was blamed for about every crime any one com- 
mitted, and for those the criminals thought about 
and never did commit. RUM is a liquor men seldom drank, espe- 
cially in this country, but those who glibly held up the minatory 
finger, in the innocence of their souls, covered all liquor, except 
wine, with the name of THE DEMON RUM. 

Well, along came Volstead and all the ills he carried in his train, 
and knew nothing about, and while we were busy trying to beat 
back the Teuton invader from the soil of France and Belgium, and 
preventing the enslavement of all mankind to Germany. Volstead 
and his friends slipped one over on us all. The Prohibitionist first 
made it a "war measure" and then he very easily made it a Con- 
stitutional Amendment. 

According to what went before there should have been an almost 
immediate stop in all kinds of crimes and, by this time, criminals 
should be almost unknown among us. Statistics were published, at 
one time, not so very long ago, to show that all over the country 
jails had become useless. People did not stop to think that the 
village soak, who nearly always sobered up in jail, never waa a 
criminal and never had what may be termed criminal tendencies. 
It took quite a while for the Village Soak to discover the way to 
the Hootcherie but, when he found it, he was to be depended upon 
to sober up in his accustomed place — the village jail. 

In the big cities and in the towns much the same condition ex- 
isted and a lot of poor misguided gentlemen did not know, for 
quite a while, what to do to get their usual liquid comforts. But 
along came the Prescription Fiend and the Recip.- Hound and the 
Hootch Maker and now the gentlemen are once again quite as poor 
and much more misguided because the stuff they drink is of the 
kind that blinds and sometimes kills. 

And so Hootch is really a criminal maker, because he causes good 
men to become hypocrites and women to he and boys and girl- 
to break the laws of the land. But poor old Hootch is blamed for 
many crimes for which he should not be held responsible. Every 



time anything criminal is reported the good and the pious and the 
Vclsteadian raise their eyebrows and look wise and in a deep and 
awesome voice say HOOTCH! 

Hootch is no more responsible now for criminal acts than whisky 
was before the days of the Good People Who Would Rather See 
Liquor Sold Illicitly than use Common Sense in Restraint of the 
Criminally Inclined and whisky and wine, it should now be appar- 
ent even to the widest eyed Prohibitionists, was not formerly the 
great factor in making criminals. 

Whenever a gangster commits an act of banditry it is blamed 
on Hootch; when a girl goes wrong, it is hootch; when a boy steals, 
it is hootch; when a minister kisses a bride, without her consent, it 
is hootch; when a man makes counterfeit money it is hootch; when 
a man burglarises a house it is hootch! We know that such state- 
ments are untrue and yet we accept the general statement that hootch 
is always responsible for everything from rape to murder. 

It is high time we used common sense. Of course, the liquor that 
is made possible by the non-enforcement of the Prohibition laws 
does make criminals, but all crimes and not even a i large percen- 
tage of crimes may be traced to hootch as the cause. To say so is 
hypocritical piffle and poppycock. Let us enforce the laws, and, 
if it is shown that we cannot do so, then let us change these laws 
and put them in such liberal shape they may be enforced and let 
us get back the income derived from taxes on liquor. Let us put a 
stop to the making of liars and hypocrites and criminals by Con- 
stitutional enactment. 



STARTING ON THE "GREAT ADVENTURE" 

So many well-known identities have passed on from the same 
locality the last week, that it would almost appear to be predes- 
tined. 

Among them is E. J. Wickson, nationally known figure through 
his writings on horticulture, and founder of the first dairy asso- 
ciation in California. Mr. Wickson was professor of horticulture in 
the University of California from 1907 to 1913; and since 1875 ha 
was editor of the Pacific Rural Press. New York was Mr. Wickson's 
native state, but he was a Californian "by adoption," and Cali- 
fornia was proud of him. 

¥ ¥ * 

The adventurous soul of Theodore Z. Blakeman, once numbered 
among General Morgan's famous raiders, has also taken flight into 
the great beyond. Many engagements in the Civil War knew his 
bayonet and fighting prowess, but as early as 1882 he was prac- 
tising law in New York, and his later years were spent only in 
fights in the law courts, where he "tempered justice with mercy." 
He also, loved and was beloved by California. 
¥ •¥ * 

Well known and liked throughout Northern California was Ed- 
ward B. Partridge, manager of the Associated Pipe Line Company 
cf San Francisco; he was a graduate of Stanford University, and 
leaves a widow. Mrs. May Partridge, and three children. 

* * * 

Identified with the financial and social life of San Francisco for 
several generations. Samuel H. Boardman succumbed last Friday, 
following a heart attack. He leaves many sorrowing relatives and 
friends. * * * 

Mrs. Edith Patten Chenfry lost her life in an au.omobile acci- 
dent in New Zealand. She was a charming and popular society 
weman. and. it seems, went to that country to bring back her sister, 
Vis. Hilda Hart, who was ill. She had innumerable friends in this 

* * * 

A native of Hanover. Germany, John H. Freudenthal passed away 
recently, at the ripe old age of 88 years. He was a member of 
California Lodge No. I, I. 0. 0. F. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 




KEM 



^ \\ 7"HAT one finds of life in . . . Eastern posts is materialism 
TT ■ ■ now, don't you go and make the very humdrum mis- 
take of maintaining that the blunting of Occidental perceptions 
which attack all Western newcomers to the Orient sounds better, or 
becomes more salutary, when it's dressed up and called 'the spell 
of the East'." 

CAREER by Dorothy Kennard is a colorful story of the life cir- 
cling about a diplomatic post in Constantinople before the great 
war. 

Through the eyes of a young British embassy secretary we get 
acquainted with the actual life of an ambassadorial family; find 
out what sort of people live in Turkey, apart from Turks and thrill 
with him over "flaunting, flowered terraces, and the "whipped cream 
and Prussian blue waters of the Bosphorus" by day, and "sea, sky 
and cypress hills bathed in silver and framed in the shadow of 
blue Eastern nights." In this country of suspended animation he 
meets crisis in career and love on the same day. All the various 
embassy chiefs are vieing with each other for the favor of Ishmael 
Pasha in order to win from him an oil concession in Turkish ter- 
ritory, and the chief interest of the story is watching this inexperi- 
enced young Britisher pitted against the wily, sinister Oriental who 
is best explained to us in his own words: "The men of my race 
(the Turks) can manage women, horses, and money, yet still do 
not succeed in getting themselves respected." 

Irene, the Levantine girl described by one diplomat as "the trap 
for our particular generation," is for us a picture of exotic beauty, 
pathetic history and tainted charm. The story is admirably told, 
but one inevitably wishes that young Fanshaw had found a fine, 
sweet Occidental girl to enter with him into "the full sunlight of life's 
garden, with the universe shut out," instead of the one who was but 
an "insidious medley of West and East" and leaves us, in the 
author's own words: "only the memory of a maze of shadows." 

Century Co. $1.90. 

%• %> * 

TIGER RIVER by Arthur 0. Friel is romantic adventure in a 
faraway corner of South America. Here in the old empire of the 
Incas, the hero searches for lost treasure, and finds matrimonial 
complications much in excess of home problems, for five native 
girls simultaneously announce themselves as his wives. The fact 
that this stirring tale is a great favorite with the men readers shows 
their sympathetic appreciation of the frantic efforts a man must 
make in acquiring treasure to provide for such a family. 

"The Pathless Trail," the first novel by this author, gives us the 
same characters, and also the same environment, but minus women 
and any sentimental interest. Both stories are very well written 
but it looks as though a sense of proportion would suggest to the 
writer to scatter a few more wives through the first novel and a 
few less through the second, — it would give, in the critic's lan- 
guage, more of a "sense of unity" to both, would it not? 

Harpers— $1.90. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

KIVETE1> STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Ave. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



FAULKNER BUCKLES ON HIS ARMOR 

Automobile Row is very much interested in the news that Al. G. 
Faulkner, once agent for the Marmon automobile and now repre- 
senting the Kissel Car, a high class representative for high class 
machines, and one of the most popular men in Motordom, has at 
last conceded to the urging of his numerous friends, and intends 
to enter the political arena as candidate for City Supervisor. 

Heretofore Mr. Faulkner has hesitated to entertain the subject 
seriously, because he felt that in justice to those with whom he was 
associated in private business, he could not spare the time neces- 
sary to the faithful performance of the duties of the office; but re- 
cently the business of which he had executive charge has been re- 
organized, bringing to the managerial force a capable man emi- 
nently fitted to take over the greater part of his work. 

"I realize that the public service is a trust that demands the best 
efforts of those who serve," says Mr. Faulkner; "I further realize 
that one must have sufficient time at his disposal to meet require- 
ments in a worth-while service; and especially do I realize that an 
industry as enormous and wide-spread as the automobile business, 
should be represented among our 'City Fathers.' If I should be 
successful in my campaign, I will make 'good roads for California' 
my particular slogan. 




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If no store is convenient, buy direct from us. 

Made by Scott Products Co., 327A Bay St., San Francisco 

Local Distributors 
San Francisco: 

White House - Sutter and Grant Avenue 

I. Magnin & Co Grant Avenue and Geary Street 

Roos Bros All Stores 

Emporium 835 Market Street 

S. & G. clump 246 Post Street 

.Miss riayes 281 Post Street 

Schwabacher-Frey 609 Market Street 

Cardinell-Vincent Co - 577 Market Street 

Sing I'h.mg Imp. Co mi] Grant Avenue 

''iiv ..f Paris Geary and Stockton 

The Paul Lau Co.. Inc 425 Grant Avenue 

Oakland: 

Roos Bros All Stores 

Smith Bros 472 13th Street 

II. C. Caswell Co 1 4th and Clay Streets 

Taft & Pennoyer 14th, 15th and Clay Streets 

John Brenner Co 15th and Clav Streets 

Lillian Blake Gift Shop 564 15th Street 

Berkeley— The Churchill Shop 2121 Center Street 

Sacramento — John Breuner Co. 

Stockton — K. E. Dean Co 44 X. Sutter Street 

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Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



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PAUL ELDER'S 



San Francisco 



July 21, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




HE4RD IT? 



— A certain colonel gave instructions one year that no one was 
to be allowed to pick the nuts that grew in the woods belonging 
to his estate, as had hitherto been the case. His gardener, going 
through the woods one day, discovered a man busily engaged in 
gathering nuts. 

"You'll have to get out of this," said the former. "I've got 
orders to keep all these nuts for the colonel this year." "It's all 
right," replied the man, "that's what I'm getting them for." Sat- 
isfied wih the reply, the gardener moved on. Meeting the man again 
a few days afterwards, he said, "Look here, you were not getting 
those nuts for the colonel at all." "I tell you I was," came the 
emphatic reply. "But I know better," said the gardener. "The colonel 
told me that he gave neither you nor anybody else any authority." 
"Well, I know jolly well I was getting them for the kernel," was 
the reply. "I didn't want the shells." 

* * * 

— A lawyer who was very found of a game of billiards had to pay 
a visit to a small town in the north and while there, wishing to 
pass the time, he found a new and very excellent billiard table. He 
accordingly inquired of the landlord if there was anyone about who 
could play, and was referred to one of the natives of the town. 
They played several games, but in each instance the countryman 
won, no matter how hard the lawyer tried. At last the latter re- 
marked, "Do you know, I've quite a reputation at home as a 
good billiard-player, but I'm not in your class. May I inquire how 
long you have played?" "Oh, for a while back," replied the native. 
"But I say, I don't want to hurt yer feelin's, but you're the first 
fellow I ever beat." 

— An amusing story is going the rounds concerning the head of 
a large department store. It is not very often that the gentleman 
in question gets caught, but this is what happened to him recently. 
While passing through the packing and clearing room he observed 
a boy lounging against a case of goods with his hands in his pock- 
ets, whistling cheerily. The chief stopped and looked at him. "How 
much do you get a week?" he demanded. "Five dollars," came 
the brief retort. "Then here's a week's money; now clear out." 
The boy quietly pocketed the money and departed. "How long has 
he been in our employ?" the chief inquired of the departmental 
manager. "Never, so far as I can remember," was the unexpected 
reply. "He has just brought me a note from another firm." 

* » » 

— Here is a story in regard to the late Andrew Carnegie: While 
on a winter visit to Florida he attended a service in a little negro 
church. When the contribution plate came around. Mr. Carnegie 
dropped a five-dollar bill upon it. After the contents of the plate 
had been counted the clergyman arose and announced, "Breth- 
ren and sisteren, the collection this evening seems to figure up to 
6 dollars and 44 cents; and if the five-dollar bill contributed by 
the gentleman from the north is genuine, the repairs on the sanc- 
tuary will begin immediately." 

* * *• 

— A certain famous artist once made a fine etching of a black- 
smith. Some months afterwards the blacksmith came to town and 
called upon the artist at his studio. "Hullo." said the artist, "what 
brings you here?' "WVII." answered the blacksmith. "1 heard a* 
how a prize had been given for that portrait you made of me, and 
I've come for the money." 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 



TownMLCrier 




j> WHO THE DEVIL ART 'THOU 

ONE THAT WILL PL Ay THE 
) DEVIL.SIR WITH VOU." 

— Shakspeare, j 



— Two local women had a brother, perhaps they still have him; 
he went on a trip around the world and has not been heard of for 
some time. This brother, if he were dead, would be valuable in 
that he left an estate of thirty thousand dollars to these two sisters. 
So they are taking no chances. They are going to dig up the body 
of a man who bore quite another name on the off chance that they 
can identify the body as that of their brother. And there is every 
chance that they will. But what will the other poor devil say if 
he can look from above at what is happening to his terrestrial re- 
mains? And what on earth possesses the sisters to think that they 
are going to get that thirty thousand, with a lawyer already in 
full purusit? What was it the old Latin said about "Sacra fames 
auri?" 



■ — Thanks to the powers that the fighting game is for the present 
over. The boats have been a nuisance owing to the crowds of 
men gathered round disputing vociferously over the merits and de- 
merits of the various fakers that make a fortune in a night of 
bunk. The morons from the offices actually take a delight in dwell- 
ing on the money made in this fashion and get a sort of vicarious 
possession of it themselves by contemplating the pile of their heroes. 
We have seen the country pass through hard times, but never did 
the most sensational occurrence which threatened even the exis- 
tence of the state, provoke the intense emotion roused by these 
fake fights. Taking all in all we are a pretty poor lot. 



— Of course all the courts are above suspicion and to go into a 
court is merely to step into a chamber dedicated to the pure light 
of reason where disputes will be settled by the application of cer- 
tain law to facts. So? Of course. Otherwise what are courts for? 
Well, such being the case, — and we are too good citizens to doubt 
it for a single moment, — why this desire to get a case in a certain 
department? One department should be as good as another, but 
the older the lawyer, the more pains we see him taking to get his 
case in the little room where he wants to try it. It is all very mys- 
terious to a layman, who can only pay and wonder. 



— We are apt to forget the distinction that our local people win 
and it needed the reminder of a cable from London to call our 
attention to the fact that Richard Tobin is United States minister 
to the Netherlands. That mission is so quiet that evidences of his 
control were lacking. Belgium was once quiet, too. A meeting in 
London which Tobin is to attend is that of the Empire Service League 
at which the American Legion will be represented. Things are get- 
ting very harmonious these days when a Tobin can be a delegate 
at an Empire Service League. Old hates die out; but new ones 
come in and so the game keeps going. 



— The police department sent a delegation to Salinas to the rodeo. 
What were the police doing at a rodeo, looking after confidence 
men? Not a bit of it, they were in the human roping business 
and showing the rurals how to hold a criminal when you have 
caught him. That is just the point — when you have caught him. 
In the meantime a little more attention to catching him would not 
be at all amiss. And with regard to these rodeos, they have be- 
come purely professional things and merely money making schemes. 
They have nothing to do with the modern cattle industry as it is 
followed, and are more in the nature of fakes than genuine exhi- 
bitions of skill. They should be looked into a little. 



— Pete McDonough's efforts towards a new trial were fraught 
with failure and brought on his head the wrath, the very new wrath of 
our newest judges. It is astonishing how dreadfully ethical new 
judges are. They lean backwards — for a while — just for a while, 
my dear, and then the essential facts of life begin to percolate 
their crania and they discover, sometimes easily and sometimes 
painfully, that they are not wearing the breeches of Jahveh but 
are very human folk in a very human world. They begin to be use- 
ful judges. But some never make the grade. They are intellectual 
popinjays and strut on the bench like a prizefighter, before he throws 
the fight. Others are really lovely, wholesome people, like Judge 
Rudkin. But they are not very many. 



— Though it is not a local matter, we are constrained to make 
reference to the death of State Senator Egbert J. Gates of South 
Pasadena, who died recently while on a trip to New York to bring 
home his daughter from school. The late Senator was one of the 
best political influences in the state. He was conservative and yet 
flexible enough to see the good in certain progressive measures. 
It was as an economist and financial expert that he was particularly 
strong. He employed all the talents which had made a fortune 
for himself in furthering the financial interests of the community. 
Such men are rare and he will be greatly missed. 



— George C. Pardee is back again in the limelight or at least strug- 
gling for the limelight. What a different California he calls to mind! 
Fire conservation is his hobby, and he charges the administration 
with carelessness in the matter of fires. With 1 37 fires thus early 
in the season something should be done, for nothing is more fool- 
ishly destructive than needless waste by fire. It seems reasonable to 
argue as he does that counties cannot look after their fires and that 
it is a matter of state concern. It is refreshing to hear the old doc- 
tor talk so sensible. 



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SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



July 21, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Let's Consolidate the Exchanges 

By HERMAN ZADIG 

WHEN one reads some of the articles that have appeared in 
the morning papers, on the Financial Pages, one is lead to 
believe that the San Francisco Stock Exchange is opposed to hav- 
ing the mining companies that are now being traded in, remain 
on the Exchange, and deal in nothing but Bonds, Industrials and 
Oil shares. 

Having been connected, if not directly, at least indirectly, with 
the Stock Exchange since 1880, I have certainly seen many big 
markets and many dull ones. 

When business was dull some of the members talked reforms 
that were generally beneficial to the Exchange, so it seems to me 
that the present move on the part of the new members may be 
the correct thing and bring about the right conditions. 

The idea is for all companies listed on the Exchange to own a 
property they are trying to develop. In other words, not to have 
companies on the Exchange whose officers are simply drawing sal- 
aries and not doing any work on the property. 

Gold and silver mining is one of the greatest industries of the 
country, and when one looks back and figures out the great wealth 
the Comstock Lode wielded, and remembers that it was through the 
listing of these shares on the San Francisco Stock Exchange which 
made it possible for the parties interested to open up these prop- 
erties at a great expense, the present proposition would seem bene- 
ficial. 

I remember at one time John W. Mackay was ge'.ting tired of pay- 
ing assessments on his Consolidated Virginia shares and it was only 
through Mr. Flood agreeing to take over his holdings that he was 
willing to keep on paying his assessments until they struck the top 
of the great bonanza which yielded over $100,000,000. This caused 
a rise from $50 a share to over $800 a share. 

This was not the first excitement in Comstcck shares. The strik- 
ing of the great ore bodies in Crown Point and Belcher caused the 
stock to advance from $2 to $2000 and made one of the greatest 
stock excitements ever known on the Exchange. 

The State of Nevada has really furnished the greatest number of 
mining camps whose shares have been actively dealt in on the Ex- 
change. 

For some reason or other the California companies never cared 
much about having their properties listed. I always thought this 
was a great mistake, as the San Francisco Stock Exchange is the 
same as all other stock exchanges,— great developers of all indus- 
tries of which gold and silver is the most important. 

It is the value the Stock Exchange places on Industrials. Rail- 
roads and Metal shares that enables the owners to go to a bank 
and borrow money on them. 

I have always maintained the New York Stock Exchange is, and 
has been, a great developer of the L'nited States and our Exchanges 
here are doing the same thing, only on a smaller scale. 

I, for one. think if a consolidation of the two exchanges can be 
brought about that it would be a good thing for the whole st.it.-. 
But if it cannot be accomplished I feel that all dissension between 
the members of the two Exchanges should cease. 

Why not take a lesson from the people of Los Angeles? They 
never have a word to say against anyone who is in the same line 
of business or anv ether business but all stand together and help 
each other. "In Unity is Strength." and let us adopt that motto, 
and whether we consolidate the two Exchanges or not. let s pull to- 
gether and have the Exchanges develop the resources of both Cali- 
fornia and Nevada, whether it is in manufacturing or in mining and 
let it make these states the great commonwealth of the West. 




By ANTISTHENES 

THE San Francisco Journal is suing the Call and the Examiner 
for $300,000. No better way than that to advertise its ex- 
istence. 



In a democracy, the ability to get elected is major; the ability 
of the elected is minor. 



What every president knows: Make junketing hay now; after, 
the crop might be short. 



When a newspaper sells its space to bigotry it's just about due 
for the journalistic boneyard. 



The most ancient, modern and potent method of advertising: 
Tell a woman not to tell. 



The psychology of modesty: not how little you wear, but in 
wearing the much, little or naught that fashion dictates. 



Eastern man, whose wife ran away with another, follows her 
across the continent. Possibly wants to make sure she kept going. 



Rockerfeller celebrated his 84th birthday. The rest of us wish 
he lives to a hundred — his prospective heirs have not been inter- 
viewed. 



Supervisor McSheehy's mayoralty slogan is, "Stop Extravagance 
in the City Government!" Did he pay his own way on that Hetch 
Hetchy picnic? 



City auditor gets demand for $2500 allotted for city's Fourth 
of July celebration. Nice financing to make it come out just twenty- 
five hundred to the dot. 



The city could save thousands of dollars did it hire taxis for 
official business trips, but then, the elected boys couldn't have those 
little joy rides after school is out at 5. 



McSheehy promises a model government if elected mayor. His 
first act. therefore, will be to refund to the city treasurer what we 
paid for his vacation at Hetch Hetchy. 

Total eclipse of the sun observed at Coronado interests a few 
astronomers; what would interest most of the public would be a 
total and permanent eclipse of William Jennings Bryan. 

The Robinson Bequest Fund of $40,000 has been turned back 
to the city treasurer after earning 4'.. per cent for the last twenty 
years. Hope it will not be reinvested in that city official owned oil 
stock. 



Frank Drew. Schmitz' manager, positively, and even seriously, 
states his protege will not run for sheriff. Quite natural, as the 
supervisor never will have much love for anything connected with 
that office. 



That rumpus in the supervisors' chamber relative to Hetch Hetchy 
. rwer distribution had nothing to do with the subject at issue. Too 
bad we can't charge them rent when they're campaigning on munic- 
ipally owned property. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 



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Chair-Riding in Fukien 




By JAMES ATON 



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DOWN here in Fukien we're really in 
China. We haven't the ricksha, that in- 
vention of the Jap and the Devil; we have- 
n't the Peking cart, that Manchurian churn 
which shakes the soul into Purgatory; and 
of course we haven't the automobile. When 
a man wants to travel down here, he does 
just like the first disciples of Confucius and 
goes on his two legs. If he's too good for 
that heaven-intended method of going and 
wants to be really extravagant, he hires a 
chair and travels on somebody else's legs. 

Chair-riding is an extravagance not to be 
lightly undertaken. It must be gone about 
with orderly decency — like an opium smoke 
or a Chinese funeral. So we send for the 
coolie who runs the chair stand. He's an 
old, spavined, broken-winded, stubborn fel- 
low who refused to die off with his contem- 
poraries, and who has inherited the honor 
of chief chair coolie. He's usually in his 
private office guarding his coffin, and some 
six hours after we've sent for him, he de- 
cides to leave it long enough to answer our 
summons. 

"Wheezy," I say kindly, "I'm thinking of 
going to Sienyu tomorrow." 

He looks me over with his one good eye 
and pretends to be weighing my words. As 
a matter of fact he's wondering when his 
coffin will be ready for its next coat of 
lacquer. I know what he's going to reply. 

"No coolies," he wheezes after his pause 
has grown to awesome length. "No coolies?" 
1 exclaim in well-simulated surprise. "Whee- 
zy, I saw six coolies in your stand this morn- 
ing." "They've gone to Ngsauh," he lies, 
and he knows that I know he's lying. "Any- 
way, no coolies will go to Sienyu now. 
They're afraid of the soldiers." "All right, 
Wheezy," I say, "1 11 walk. Never mind 
hunting for coolies." He knows I'm lying; 
my statement is the next move in our verbal 
checker game. 

He considers for a time. "Perhaps I can 
get you chair-men from outside the city," 
he lies, "but they'll cost three dollars a man, 
big money." "Now Wheezy, the regular rate 
is two dollars a man," I say sternly, "and 
that's all I'll pay." 

"Asiade (agreed)," he says, and the line 
of argument changes. I know full well that 
when I pay the men off at Sienyu, they'll 
claim the bargain was for three dollars a 
man. This little conversation is merely for 
the sake of getting three dollars written into 
the testimony. Wheezy isn't through with 
me yet. He looks at me appraisingly, up 
and down and sideways. "You'll need four 
men," he coughs out at last. "Last time I 
went in the road-chair with only two men," 
I counter, "and I'm surely no heavier now. 



Besides, I always help the men a great deal." 
(By "helping" I mean that I walk a share 
of the journey to ease the carriers.) 

Wheezy decides to wake up and become 
eloquent. He has a good lot to say. He 
tells me I was so heavy last time that one 
of my men strained his back and hasn't 
been able to carry since. And my "road- 
chair" is broken; I'll have to take a "regu- 
lar" chair — which is some pounds heavier. 
And every coolie in Hinghwa has sworn 
not to carry me with less than four to the 
chair. And, most important of all, Doctor 
Johnston always travels with four men. That 
Johnston weighs a hundred pounds heavier 
than I makes no difference. If one doctor 
has four men, all other doctors ought to 
have four men, in order to manifest to South 
China their equal consequence. That's un- 
answerable Chinese logic. At last we com- 
promise on three men, which is just the num- 
ber that Wheezy intended to slip over on 
me when he started the argument. 

So the chair is bargained for and the 
pleasure begins. I've told Wheezy that I'll 
start at eight in the morning. While the 
Shanghais are giving their six o'clock crow. 
Wheezy and his coolies begin to stick their 
heads in the door and tell me it's time to 
start. They keep this up as spasmodically 
regular as a Big Ben. I get tired of the rep- 



etition after an hour, leave undone the things 
I ought to have done, pick up a half-packed 
suit-case, and start on my journey. 

Of course my coolies have vanished. 
They've imprecated and commanded and ex- 
horted me till they've succeeded in working 
up a healthy Chinese appetite; so now they 
are cff down the street eating rice. I'm all 
ready to start now, and eager; and I spend 
thirty minutes practicing my out-of-date pre- 
war curses — those I learned on my last trip 
to America. 

At last they're back and at last we're off. 
Hold on a minute though! What's this 
fourth man for? I thought I was to travel 
with three. I look old Wheezy sternly in 
his active eye and demand an explanation. 

He looks everywhere else but at me, and 
assumes an expression like a bull calf on 
a hunger strike. "Bohaddo! Bohaddo!" (no 
help for it) he says over and over. That's 
all I can get out of him. 

"Take your four coolies and put them 
behind your coffin, Wheezy," I say. "I don't 
want them. I'm going to walk." 

I'm a trifle anxious as I say these posi- 
tive words, for one can never be quite sure 
how a Chinese coolie will react to any given 
"bluff," and I really don't want to walk to 
Sienyu. Wheezy takes his mind off his cof- 
fin long enough to observe that I am fully 




M;tn<lm in on Pony 



July 21, 1923 

able to carry out my threat. I'm not sickly, 
and I'm a good walker; so he decides that 
maybe I really mean what I say. He hesi- 
tates, wavers, weakens, surrenders; and with 
three coolies — two in front and one behind — 
I start triumphantly for Sienyu. 

We're rather lucky on our way out through 



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the South Gate ; we knock over two men — 
cnly two. One of them is blind, and the 
other is a soldier. Every time I go chair- 
riding, my coolies manage to knock over 
at least one soldier. I don't blame them for 
it — Chinese soldiers ought to be knocked 
over. Ordinarily the knocked-over soldier 
would arise in outraged importance and split 
open the knocker's head with the butt end 
of his gun. But the coolie who is carrying 
a foreign doctor is carrying the best kind of 
life assurance. It's a pleasure to see what a 
protection I am. The insulted soldier is about 
to open hostilities when he discovers the for- 
eigner in the chair. He decides to postpone 
revenge, and instead he relieves himself by 
the misuse of a large assortment of classical 
Chinese swear-words. 

We jog along pretty steadily for the first 
three po. I manage to read three chapters 
of Confucius. I always read Confucius when 
I'm chair-riding. I'm vainly trying to dis- 
cover what there was great about him — 
aside from the fact that he divorced his 
wife. 

I've been sitting tight while the coolies 
eat at the three-po inn, and now they sug- 
gest that I "help" them a bit. But I'm not 
eager to walk, and I believe I'll chance rid- 
ing one more po. So, after some grumbling, 
they pick me up, and we're off again. 

It's an anxious po — this next one. I shut 
up Confucius and watch my coolies. I know 
perfectly well what they'll do if they're de- 
termined to make me walk. One of them 
will accidently stumble and tip me into some 
ripe ditch-mud. How suggestive is the ryth- 
mic "pad. pad, pad," of their straw-sandalled 
feet on the rough stone path! I'm hearing 
the footsteps of the five million burden 
bearers of Fukien. 

The fourth po ends; and my coolies stop 
again for rice and invite me in no uncertain 
tones to help them. I agree with alacrity. 
One grcws tired of riding in constant fear of 
a fall. 

New comes a real contest of muscles and 
wits. Whatever happens. I must keep ahead 
cf my chair. Once le! it get in front of me, 
and I II not see it again this side of Sienyu. 
How those ccclies do crowd me — just like 
a Michigan farmer in a Ford crowds a road 
heg in a lumber wagon. And, as usual, I 
lose out. I see a leper begging by the road- 
side. At least he looks like a leper, and I 
have to stop and investigate; I've never seen 
a hper up this way before. When my curi- 
osity is satisfied, and I come back to the 
realities of this earthly pilgrimage, my chair 
is gene. Quite evidently my men misun- 
derstood me and thought I told them to 
walk rn ahead. 

Nine profane English miles I walk, and 
at last 1 come up with my chair-men. They 
are waiting innocently two miles outside of 
Sienyu, and they carry me impressively into 
the city. It's no use to rebuke them I'd 
lese my face if I trie it 

I'm tired when I nd in Sienyu. and I 
want a bath and something to eat. But first 



II 



I have to spend two hours convincing those 
honest laborers that all I'll pay is two dol- 
lars a man. It's a strenuous two hours, be- 
lieve me; when I finish victorious at last, 
I've used up my entire Chinese vocabulary. 
I think less of Confucius than ever; his fool 
religion is to blame for the whole perfect 
day. 

That's chair-riding in Fukien. 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 




BUSY CUI'ID 

PETERS-JACKMAN — Miss Anne Peters o£ San Francisco became 
the bride o£ James C. Jackman, on Monday last. They were 
married at Old St. Mary's Cathedral, and after a reception 
at the Fairmont Hotel, departed on an automobile honey- 
moon. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father 
Stark. Joseph Peters, brother of the bride, gave her away. 
She was attended by Mrs. Robert Hayes Smith as matron 
of honor, while Robert Bigelow of Boston acted as best man. 
Miss Peters, now Mrs. Jackman, has long been prominently 
identified with San Francisco's social life. She is the daugh- 
ter of J. D. Peters of Stockton. Mr. Jackman, son of Ed- 
ward F. Jackman, Pittsburgh, Pa., millionaire, is with the 
United Bank & Trust Company. 

LENKON-GWYNN — The marriage o£ Miss Ruth Lennon, daugh- 
ter of Arthur Joseph Lennon of Seattle, to Charles Gwynn, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. John R. Gwynn of San Francisco, took 
place at St. Mary's Cathedral on Saturday afternoon. Only 
members of the family were present and the bridal couple 
left immediately after the ceremony for a wedding trip south. 
Upon their return they will take possession of their new 
apartments on Sacramento street. The bride is a graduate 
of the Bishop School. She had as her only attendant at 
her wedding, Mrs. Cyril Cornwallis-Stevenson, who was Miss 
Cornelia Gwynn before her marriage. Arthur Joseph Len- 
non, the bride's father, will come to San Francisco to es- 
tablish his permanent residence. 

STAFFORD-MOULTON — Much interest centers in the announce- 
ment of the betrothal of Miss Frances Stafford and Irving F. 
Moulton, whose marriage will take place in the early fall, 
For years Mr. Moulton was cashier of the Bank of California, 
from which institution he retired not long ago. The news of 
the engagement was told to a coterie of the friends of the 
two families at a tea given recently by the Misses Dorothy 
and Helen Stafford, sisters of Miss Frances. Mrs. James 
Friel, daughter of Mr. Moulton, assisted, as did Mrs. Frances 
Stafford, mother of the bride-elect. 

SUDDEN-HEITMAN — Mrs. Margaret E. Sudden and William 
Anothony Heitman were married at Fairfield, Solano county, 
on July 10. The ceremony was witnessed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Harold E. Blair Jr., the latter a daughter of the bride, and 
by Edward Sudden, a son and student at Stanford University. 
Mrs. Aida Johnson was the bride's only attendant. 

KNOX-McGAW — Miss Emma Knox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John T. Knox of Berkeley, became the bride of Baldwin Mc- 
Gaw, son of Mr. and Mrs. John McGaw of San Francisco, 
Wednesday evening, the ceremony taking place at the Knox 
home in Berkeley. Mrs. Ellsworth Van Patten (Evelyn Mc- 
Gaw 7 ), a bride of last October, was matron of honor. The 
bridesmaids were Miss Nellie Knox and Miss Constance Mc- 
Gaw. Sherman Storer of Chicago, a college chum, was best 
man. Young McGaw graduated this summer from the Uni- 
versity of California. The bridal couple plan to establish 
a residence in San Francisco. 

LOOP-HOBBS — The engagement of Miss Virginia Loop, daugh- 
ter of the late Frank Sumner Loop and of Mrs. Loop of this 
city, to Charles S. Hobbs, formerly of Fresno and now of 
San Francisco, was announced this week. The two families 
are well known in this state, particularly in the bay region. 
The late F. S. Loop was one of the leading lumbermen con- 
nected with this industry on the coast. Young Hobbs served 
as a lieutenant with the Twelfth Infantry in France. He grad- 
uated from Stanford in 1919. The wedding will take place 
in the early winter. 

LUNCHEONS 

ZEILE — Miss Marion Zeile entertained Wednesday at a luncheon 
at the Fairmont Hotel in compliment to Mrs. Willard Cham- 
berlain of Pittsburg. Mrs. Chamberlain was Miss Innes Keen- 
ey of this city and with her two children will spend the summer 
in California. 

FLOOD — Mrs. Moseley Taylor was the guest of honor at a lunch- 
eon which Miss Mary Emma Flood gave Wednesday after- 
noon at "Linden Towers," her home in Menlo Park. Miss 
Flood returned Tuesday with a party of friends from the 
Flood ranch in the south. 



NEWHALL — Mr. and Mrs. William Mayo Newhall Jr. enter- 
tained Tuesday at a luncheon in honor of Mrs. Frederick 
Sharon. This was the first formal affair of size given by Mrs. 
Newhall since her return from abroad. The affair was held 
at the home of the hostess in Jackson street and was attended 
by several out-of-town guests as well as San Francisco resi- 
dents. 

CLARK — In honor of Mr. and Mrs. Lorillard Suffern Tailer of 
New York, who passed the week-end at Burlingame and ar- 
rived Monday at the Fairmont Hotel for a brief visit in San 
Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Clark Jr. and Mr. and 
Mrs. Howard Park were joint hosts at a luncheon given on 
Saturday at the Burlingame Country Club. 

GRANT — Mrs. Joseph D. Grant was a luncheon hostess last week 
in honor of her house guest, Mrs. Philip Van Home Lans- 
dale. They returned Tuesday to their homes in Burlingame 
after having spent the week-end together at the Grant ranch 
on Mount Hamilton. 

MORSE — Mr. S. F. B. Morse was host at the Hotel St. Francis 
to a charming party which included Mrs. Lawrence McCreery, 
Mrs. Howard Park, who recently returned from New York; 
Mrs. Walker Salisbury, Mrs. William G. Parrott on Monday. 

SAMPSON — Mrs. James Stewart Sampson was hostess at a hand- 
somely appointed bridge luncheon at the St. Francis Hotel 
on Tuesday. Mrs. Raymond Shock of Detroit and Mrs. Ad- 
dison Burbank were the guests of honor. 

McGOWAN — Mrs. George A. McGowan asked some of her friends 
to be her guests at a luncheon party at her home on Broad- 
way Wednesday. The affair was for Mrs. Wallace R. Dowd, 
wife of Lieutenant Dowd of the navy, who is here on a visit. 
There has been a round of affairs for Mrs. Dowd. 

MILLER — Mrs. Harry East Miller and Mrs. John Knox Bryant 
joined in entertaining some of their friends at a, handsome 
luncheon party at the Town and Country Club Tuesday in 
honor of three visitors. Miss Anne Watson of Mississippi, who 
is visiting Mrs. Harrison Clay; Miss Anne Barker of Port- 
land and Miss Temple Child of Missouri. Miss Child is visit- 
ing the John Charles Knox family while attending the sum- 
mer school at U. C. 

TEAS 

ANDERSON — Mrs. Frank B. Anderson was hostess at a small 
bridge party a few days ago at the Town and Country Club. 
Among the guests were Mrs. John Wright, Mrs. Edwin L. 
Griffith, Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall and Mrs. Carter Pitkin Pome- 
roy. 

DINNERS 

POND — Mrs. Edward Bates Pond presided as hostess at a dinner 
a few evenings ago at the Pond residence in San Mateo. Mrs. 
Pond was Miss Lillian Hopkins before her marriage a short 
time ago. Among the guests w : ere Mr. and Mrs. William G. 
Parrott, Miss Helen Crocker, Miss Mary Martin, Mr. Rich- 
ard Schwerin, Mr. Stephen Parrott of Paris, Captain F. L. 
Tottenham of the British Embassy at Washington, D. C. 

WILLIAMS — Mr. and Mrs. Evan Williams were hosts to the 
summer colony at Woodside and Menlo Park on Saturday 
evening, having about forty guests at a dinner dance at the 
Menlo Golf and Country Club. 

CARPENTER — A dinner aud reception was given by Miss Estelle 
Carpenter, prominent member of the National Education As- 
sociation and Direction of Music in the Public Schools, in 
honor of the famous Aloha Trio from Hawaii, Wednesday 
evening, July 11, at the Fairmont Hotel. 

IX TOWN AND OUT 

TATTERSALL — Mr. and Mrs. James L. Tattersall Jr. have re- 
turned from a trip to Del Monte. Included in their party 
were Miss Margot Tynan, Miss Doris Peschon, Mr. J. Curtis 
Taylor and Mr. Joseph J. Tynan Jr. 

CHAMBERLAIN — Mr. and Mrs. Selah Chamberlain and their 
children have joined the fashionable summer colony at Santa 
Barbara for several weeks. 

BULLOCK — Miss Louise Bullock returned to her home in the 
city Monday after passing the week-end at Palo Alto as the 
guest of Dr. and Mrs. Walter Boardman. 






COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 21. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



tayi.or — Mrs. Mooseley Taylor (Emily Pope), who recently 
arrived in California to spend the summer with her par- 
ants, Mr, and Mrs. George A. Pope, at their home at Burlin- 
game, chaperoned a party of young people to Del Monte over 
the week-end. In the party were: .Miss Edith Grant, Miss 
Eleanor Spreckels, Miss Elizabeth and Miss Ellita Adams, 
.Mr. Geoffrey Montgomery, Mr. George Montgomery, Mr. Rus- 
sell Wilson, Mr. Leon Brooks Walker and Mr. Kenneth Pope. 

MARTIN — Miss Mary .Martin, the eldest daughter of Mr. and 
.Mrs. Walter Martin, left several days ago for Santa Barbara, 
where she will enjoy a brief visit as the guest of Mrs. Law- 
rence Fox Jr. Mrs. Fox recently left for the southern resort, 
where she has taken a house for the remainder of the season 

BULL — Commodore James H. Bull, who has been passing the 
last two months in Santa Barbara, where he and Mrs. Bull 
had a cottage for the months of June and July, has returned 
to his home in Clay street. Mrs. Bull is lingering in the 
south for a week or two longer and will return to San Fran- 
cisco around August 1. 

LUNDBORG — Miss Heleue Lundhorg, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Irving Lundhorg of Piedmont, who has recently returned from 
New York, is at present in Santa Barbara, the guest of Miss 
Mary Chickering. Miss Lundborg has been attending Miss 
Spence's school in New York. Miss Chickering and her moth- 
er, Mrs. Roger Chickering, are passing the summer at Mira- 
mar. 

PARROTT — Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott and Master 
Billy Parrott have taken possession of their new home in San 
Mateo. The residence was formerly occupied by Mrs. Harry 
Hunt, who is now residing in Beverly Hills. 

HARRIMAN — Mrs. Mary W. Harriman, widow of E. H. Harri- 
man, arrived in San Francisco accompanied by her daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Charles Cary Rumsey, and grandchildren. Upon 
reaching the city the party went to the St. Francis. They 
left Monday for Santa Barbara, where Mrs. Harriman's son, 
Roland Harriman, and his family live. 

SHARON — Mrs. Fred Sharon spent the week-end as the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker at Burlingame, return- 
ing to her apartments at the Palace Hotel Monday. Mr. and 
Mrs. Crocker entertained at a dinner in honor of Mrs. Sharon 
on Sunday evening. 

MERRILL — Mrs. John F. Merrill and her granddaughter. Miss 
Frances Merrill, have been entertaining Miss Marjorie M. Yin- 
cent and Miss Dorothea Porter, together with Mr. Denbigh 
Ellis, a titled Australian, at their country place at Monterey, 
for the past week. 

ARTSIMOYITCH — Madame Valdiniir Artsimovitch of Paris is in 
California for the summer and is the guest of relatives and 
friends. She traveled to the United States in company with 
Mrs. William Griffith Henshaw and is now the guest of her 
sisters, Mrs. Jennie Hobbs Goodwin and Mrs. Anna Ferris, 
in Berkeley. Mrs. Artsimovitch was formerly Mrs. Beulah 
Hobbs Jones of this city. 

SULLIVAN — Mr. Noel Sullivan, who went abroad two years ago 
in company with his uncle, former Senator .lames D. Phelan, 
has returned to San Francisco. 

LAW — Dr. and Mrs. Hubert E. Law have taken a house at Palo 
Alto where they will remain until September. 

BUCKLEY — Mr. and Mrs. Chris Buckley Jr. of San Francisco 
spent the week-end at Del Monte Lodge. Among well known 
folk who passed the last week-end at tin lodge were Mr. and 
Mrs. Jos. D. Redding and Mrs. Ashton Potter of San Fran- 
cisco, and Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Rurmister. who with their son 
ami daughter, "ere quests id' the A. S ' 

CROCKER — Alts Tempi, Ion Crocker and Miss Helen Crorker 

have left for Southern California, going by motor. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary Mrrel >.\x FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOOniURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter (IS* I" inter Management CARL S STANLEY 




\_2£ 



By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

Gordon Mitchie, production manager for the Rellimeo Films, 
who have offices in the Chronicle building, has just returned from 
a trip to New York to make releasing arrangements for the first 
picture of the organization. They will release through Selnick, 
and the picture will be given to the world in September. It was 
recently completed at the Universal Studios at Universal City, 
and was shot under the title of "Heartstrings," but it will be 
released as the Selnick prize title picture, with an offer of $5 00 
to the fan suggesting the best title. The story is by Grace Sand- 
erson Mitchie, author of "The Finger of Justice" and other photo 
plays, and the all-star cast includes such players as Monte Blue. 
Irene Rich, Tully Marshall, Russell Simpson, Jackie Saunders, 
James Gordon and George Rheems. It is a six reel feature and 
every foot of it is said to be interesting. The organization will 
begin work on their next picture within two weeks. 

John McDermott, well known director with the First National, 
has been in San Francisco for several days looking up location 
for their next picture. It will be "Her Temporary Husband." 
and a large part of the picture will be made here, and it will 
have unusual interest, as it will be the first comedy ever filmed 
in which really large numbers of people will be used. It is ex- 
pected to have as high as seven thousand in some of the scenes. 
Mr. McDermott himself will direct, and the all star cast will 
include such well known favorites of the silver screen as Sidney 
Chaplin, Owen Moore, Tully Marshall, George Cooper and Chuck 
Riesnier. 

The Wesl Coast Films Corporation, of which N. Dragomanovich 
is the head, and which has been doing business for the last two 
years with offices in the Monadnock building in this city, have 
decided to move the center of their activities to Los Angeles. 
They have an extensive future program for the production of 
pictures mapped out, and will make their headquarters either 
tit the Hollywood Studios or the Cosmosart Art Studios, lately 
taken over by Charles Ray. 

* # * 

Buster Kenton and wife. Xatalie Talmadge. spent the week 
end as guests a( the Palace Hotel. They are on their way home 
from Truckee, where they have been working on location, and 
Buster Is ol special interest to San Francisco at the moment, 
tnst picture, "Three Ages," had iis world's premiere 
tit the Warfleld Theater lasl Saturda 

* * * 

The Qraf Production office is a busy place these days, as the 
organization expects <•■ begin shooting their next picture. "Half 
Dollar Bill." the first of Autnst Studio work on the picture will 
he done at the Pacific Simlios at San Mate,,, and the sea stuff 
thy waters. H Hesser Walraven. a member of the or- 
ganization for the past two years, has been made business man- 
• the company. 

* * * 

Gibson (lowland, who is playing McTeague in the Eric Yon 
Strohelm production of "Creed." had his first few days off last 
week since the starting of the picture, almost four months ago, 
and took advantage of them to make a hurried trip to Los An- 
geles to see his little son. Peter, and spend a few hours at the 
C.oldwvn Studio. 

* * * 

Cnllen Tate, location director for the Fame" -Lasky 

Studios, and his assistant. Paul Iribe. are in town hunting loca- 
tions for a forth-coming Lasky picture. 



I 




MART HERETO 



CAROLINE JONES 



I 
Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2 : 30, ! 

i 

i 



and tea from 3 (o 5 



an A 



V 5 334 SITTER STREET Douglas 7118 ; 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 




By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money — IV. 

THERE are many suggestions afloat at 
all times as to cheap money. The main 
idea, as I have said before, seems to be 
that government may create money, that 
its fiat gives money value, that if we say 
a thing is so, all of us, all together, then it 
is surely so. Nothing could be farther from 
the truth. Government cannot create money 
and at the same time guarantee its continued 
and non-fluctuating value or buying power 
unless that money is represented in govern- 
ment vaults somewhere by some commodity 
of great value and of steady value. 



Land As a Base 

We have shown in the preceding chap- 
ters published on cheap money that land is 
no base upon which to issue money. In fact, 
land seems to have proven the very worst 
thing upon which to base a circulating med- 
ium and expect it to have a constant buy- 
ing power. That circulating medium will vary 
according to the value of the land and there 
is nothing so sensitive and so variable as 
land values. And who is it who is going to 
give land its value upon which to base a 
currency? 



Money Wtith No Value Base 

Surely to those who advocate printing 
press money with no base of any value, 
except the statement of the government, it is 
useless to quote the unbroken line of failures 
by governments to establish a money of that 
kind? The best modern instances are to be 
found in Russia, in Poland, in Germany, and 
numerous other states of semi-bankrupt Eu- 
rope. 



The People's Money 

The very best and the worst reason why 
anyone should advocate the issue of an un- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 172 5 San Francisco. Cal. 



limited quantity of paper money is that this 
money, published in limitless fashion, will 
reach more people and that, per capita, 
everybody will have more money. It is an 
idea by which many hope to fill the pockets 
of the poor with doubloons, roubles, or 
marks. But an unlimited printing press does 
NOT do this at all. It simply litters the 
country with money and this money is dis- 
tributed among those who are capable of 
getting their hands on it and those who can- 
not do so get little of it, no matter how cheap 
money is printed, and a money which is 
printed in an unlimited manner has a limitless 
possibility of losing in buying power. The 
cheaper the money the less it buys, until at 
length it buys nothing and people resort to 
bartering to escape having to be burdened 
with a valueless paper currency. 

John Law, Apostle of Cheap Money 

Who was John Law? A notorious adven- 
turer and gambler. He is responsible, how- 
ever, for the establishment of credit in 
France, for it was his private bank, a suc- 
cessful organization, which was the first bank 
of circulation and discount and its bills were 
accepted by the government. John Law was 
the son of an Edinburgh jeweler and money 
changer. After a meteoric career of gamb- 
ling, dueling, and reckless adventure he 
turned his mind to the inventing of various 
schemes of finance. He appeared before the 
Duke of Orleans, who was broke, just after 
the death of Louis IV. with one of his many 
schemes. He was listened to very carefully 
and Law convinced the monarch that the 
prosperity of a nation depended simply upon 
the size of the circulating medium. 



The Royal Bank 

John Law was made the director. He im- 
mediately began on the task of uniting the 
wealth of France into one mass. He would 
unite all of the capitalists of France and 
place in their control, as a loan, all of the 
elements of wealth from landed property to 
the uncertain ventures of colonial trade. He 
obtained control of the great territory of 
Louisiana, of the Senegal, of French East 
India, of parts of China, and each of these 
was made the excuse for the issue of notes. 
Trading companies, in all of these and other 
places, were made the basis of other issues. 
He began the collection of taxes and the 
imposition of the same; in fact, he desired 
to get every government activity, which 
meant money, into the same hands. 



Unlimited Money 

His first issue was of one hundred and ten 
millions of pounds of sterling. A wave of 
prosperity rushed over France. Parliament 
became frightened and strove to put a stop 
to the mania, but Law threatened to abolish 
it for presuming to stand in the way. From 
all over France men hurried to Paris to spec- 
ulate. Everybody seemed to be getting richer 
and nobody poorer. The bank continued its 
issue until it had issued 833,000,000 francs 
more than it was authorized to print. It 
issued more than twelve billions of francs of 
shares built upon an original issue of two 
million. Scarcely had the whole system been 
made complete when the first evidences of 
a coming collapse were to be seen. 



People Flee the Ship 

Then the people began to change, or at- 
tempt to change, their money and their 
shares into something of stable value. Gold 
began to be hoarded and prices advanced 
enormously. Forcing laws of every descrip- 
tion were passed to give real value to the 
avalanche of paper money. All the violent 
decrees failed to have an effect and then 



Grand 
Canyon 
Line . 



until September 15 
Good for return 

October 31 
Liberal S topoverj 

S ample round trip 

Pares 

Chicago i 8622 
Kansas City 72« 
Denver 64«2 
Houston 72ss 
NewYork. 147*2 
Minneapolis 87S 
St. Louis 81 S3 
Omaha 7222 
New Orleans 85 S 
Boston 15332 

and many others 

R. D. Johnson, Div. Pass. 
Agt, 601 Market St. Ph. 
Sutter 7600; or Market 
St. Ferry, Ph. Sutter 7600 
San Francisco 

ickeast 

excursions 



July 21. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



l» 



the government decreed the value of the 
shares and notes should be reduced one half. 
This was the end. The big bubble collapsed 
and credit had been absolutely destroyed. 
The people gave themselves over to rage and 
despair. The bank was abolished and Law 
became a tramp, dying in Venice in 1 729, 
a pauper. I have tried to tell this story in 
as few words as possible but those who are 
interested will find it one of the most won- 
derful tales in history. Next week I will at- 
tempt to give you an idea of the Argentine 
Cheap Money Paradise. 



Run It Like a Corporation 

The new order, from the budget chief of 
the State of California, is destined to bring 
the recalcitrant department chiefs of the 
state's economic and functional machinery in- 
to line. The state's business is the people's 
business and Richardson was placed into of- 
fice to do exactly what he is so refreshingly 
doing. The people have a right to ask that 
their business be run on the same lines as the 
business of any well managed private cor- 
poration and that is what they are now get- 
ting at the hands of Mr. Richardson and be- 
cause of his program. No corporation would, 
for one minute, tolerate the attitude of a 
hired man or woman who acted as the sal- 
aried officials of two departments are now 
acting and these officials would be "fired" 
at once if they attempted such tactics with 
the management of a private corporation or 
with the policies of the manager in whom 
the stockholders had the fullest confidence. 



The Ruhr Again 

Stanley Baldwin and Lord Curzon have 
had their say about Germany and are at- 
tempting, with the aid of others, outside of 
England, to bring heavy pressure to bear on 
France and Belgium to get out of the Ruhr. 
There is no likelihood whatever of this thing 
happening unless Great Britain and the oth- 
ers will agree to pay up the German repa- 
rations bill and then take their own time 
getting the money out of the Teutons. France 
CANNOT get out of the Ruhr now unless 
she gets out triumphantly and with the money 
paid to her or so securely guaranteed that 
there will be no doubt of the eventual pay 
day coming around. The next step of France 
and Belgium should be the march on Berlin 
and the dictation of terms from that capital. 



Japanese May Lease Land 

The right to lease land, for other than 
commercial purposes, has been upheld, for 
the Japanese, by the ruling of Judge Hew- 
itt of the Los Angeles Superior Court, in a 
decision regarding the building of Sanatorium 
for Japanese, at San Pedro Bay. 



The P. G. and E. 

The successor to Mr. Britton, of beloved 
memory, as vice president and general man- 
ager, has been named. Frank A. Leach Jr. 
has been made such by the board of directors 
of the P. G. and E. Mr. Leach is locally 



and nationally well known and highly re- 
spected. He is a most capable executive 
officer. Mr. Leach knows all there is to know, 
as to the gas and electric service business, 
and seems to be the most logical selection 
as a successor to Mr. Britton. 



Louis M. King Resigns 

Louis M. King, so long secretary of the 
Chamber of Commerce, has resigned. Mr. 
King is a man who is well liked in the busi- 
ness world on account of his quick intelli- 
gence and his sympathetic bearing as well 
as for his many achievements as an official 
•of the Chamber of Commerce. He has not 
said what he is going to do in a business 
way, but the good wishes of thousands go 
to him in anything he may undertake in the 
future. 



Shipping 

It is to be regretted that there should have 
arisen any further delay in the sale of Ship- 
ping Board vessels to the Pacific Mail S. S. 
Company. This company is ready to take 
over the five vessels almost immediately as 
part of its fleet. 



Boyes Hot Springs 

45 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. W. P. R . R. 

Beautiful New Golf Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths, Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools, Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. LICHTENBERG, Boyes Springs, 

Or Peck-Judah, 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



OLD 

i:\Tnn 

Kl I' \ I 111 li 



TYPEWRITERS 

i- mi rji ni t Factory Rebuilt 

All Makes ; 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

50Q Market St., San Fran. Phone Ponir. rt »:« 
308 12th St.. Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth ami 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 6 ! San Francisco 



The Rates Are 
Reasonable 

at this 

Delightful 
Hotel 

DAILY 

One person, room with 

bath $3.50 

Two persons, room with 

bath $5.00 

One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY RATES 

One person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $21.00 

Monthly rates are figured at 24 
days to the month. 

*^^^^^*^*^ Bathing, tennis, 

, golf, fishing, 

Q/i dancing, boat- 

cn ,, ing. European 

"better plan — dining 

CD/ room in connec- 

rlace tion. Come by 

• rt /"*_» State Highway 

10 ^° or S. P. Open the 

mmmmmmam^^^m year 1 ■ >UI1'1. 

CASA 
DEL RETT 

4<? NTA C«4> 



Agua Caliente Springs 

The Fireproof Hotel in 
the Valley of the Moon 

Private baths. Swimming pool, filled 
dally with hot sulphur water. No chem- 
icals used in this water. Golf course 
to hotel. My motto — service, 
cleanliness and the best of table. If 
you want health and rest this Is the 
place. Make reservation early. Address 
T. H. Corcoran, Prop., Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co. 



Open Every Day from 8 



to • p. m. 



GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In Snn Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

PIMM Kr.mr 45t( 

Try Our Specinl Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

H — *- Sertfd a la Carte. Alio Keiular 
French end Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 



Pleasures Ww 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Tom Moore- 



At the "Capitol" 

Marjorie Rambeau and her winning laugh 
and smile, supplemented by her artistic abil- 
ity, scored a triumph to a very well filled 
house on the occasion of the presentation 
of "The Goldfish," at the Capitol Theater, 
on Monday night. The start throughout sus- 
tained a well thought out and splendidly 
rendered characterization of the girl, Jenny 
Jones, as she climbs the social ladder. There 
was little of the over done in her part and 
the final product, as Mrs. Hamilton J. Pow- 
ers, was well worth the applause which 
greeted the very lovely ending of the play. 
Lawrence Grant's Count Nevski called for 
every particle of the actor's craft and was 
well rendered. Miss Helen Sullivan made a 
more than creditable Amelia Pugsley while 
Jim Witherby, as the original and the final 
husband, won approval from the audience. 
John Steppling's Krauss and Richard Tuck- 
er's Powers, except for the rough edges, 
which seem always to be inevitable in a first 
performance, left little to be desired. A 
greater smoothness and an added pleasure 
will be given the audience as the week pass- 
es by. Miss Rambeau is a fine looking wo- 
man, one of the beauties of the stage. Her 
costuming is exceptionally excellent and a 
joy to the gentler sex. The stage was well 
set and carried right along with the play, 
so as to show the gradations in the social 
climb of the heroine. There are plenty of 
places to laugh, but at the same time, "The 
Goldfish" carries its message and it is a good 
one. 



A Wonderful Production at the Curran 

Fluttering fans, tossing curls, hoop skirts 
and frills, tight trousers and stocks, bows 
and courtesies, elegance in surroundings, 
costumes and manners, obsequious foot-men 
and costly service, but through it all, grim 
tragedy stalking, and at last over-taking the 
stately lady of "Bleak House," whose last 
breath flickers out in the slums of London, 
in a deadly fog, near the river where she 
seeks Nepenthe. 

There are parts in this play which border 
on the melodramatic, as for instance, in the 
scene mentioned, just saved by the magni- 
ficent acting of Marget Anglin; parts in it 
as subtly tragical as "Lady Macbeth," when, 
at the end of the first act, we hear the "tap," 
"tap," of ghostly footsteps on the terrace, 
and Lady Dedlock makes her exit, saying: 
"Some day they will walk me down!" and 
a touch of Dickens' humor, when the mag- 
istrates come back to say impressively to In- 
spector Bucket, before they go out to take 



the footprints in the snow: "One thing is 
certain; those prints are either a man's or 
a woman's!" 

"Harold Skimpole" in whom Dickens cari- 
catured Leigh Hunt, adds to the few bits 
of comedy, aided and abetted by the ever 
endearing Emilie Melville, who as "Volum- 
nia Dedlock," skips in sprightly manner 
about the stage, levelling her elderly charms 
at "Harold." 

No one could be more stately and queen- 
like than Anglin as "Lady Dedlock," nor. 
mere temperamental and vixenish than the 
French maid, Hortense, and to be able to 
pcrtray these two absolutely opposite char- 
acters in the same play, as Anglin does, 
would alone mark her as an exceptionally 
wonderful actress. She is more than that; 
she is sublime! The "Tulkinghorn" of John 
Ivancovish, that devilish, scheming old black 
"spider," is splendidly done, and with a few 
exceptions, Miss Anglin is ably supported. 



Jazz at Granada 

"The Children of Jazz" shows the trend 
of the young folk of today toward light and 
frivolous amusement that leads them into 
more serious situations than they dreamed of 
in their inconsequent frivolity and love of 
fun. Eileen Percy is the gay and thought- 
less young heroine whose home is turned 
over to a frenzy of excitement and merry- 
making, contrasting strongly with the dig- 
nified, old-fashioned residence of conven- 
tionality where the hero, Theodore Kosloff, 
reigns supreme. The Jazz Revue, staged by 
Boris Petroff and Paul Ash, is a colorful 
and tuneful presentation. A news film and 
a Lige Conley comedy, "Back Fire," com- 
plete the program. 



Imperial 

"The Merry-go-round" to 'this writer's way 
of thinking, is another misnomer so frequent 
in the movies. It is quite a wonderful pic- 
ture, well thought out and constructed, ex- 
cellently presented and admirably acted. The 
story is about Vienna, once Europe's most 
gay and festive city. The love of a "hoch- 
gebcren" young officer, personal aide to the 
Austrian Emperor, for a pretty peasant girl, 
is the thread on which hangs this absorb- 
ing drama. The scenes and incidents are 
depicted by a hand that is skilled in accu- 
rate knowledge of what it was doing. The 
dramatic power of the picture is great, and 
the appearance of a little-known young ac- 
tress, Mary Philbin, is a matter of impor- 
tance. Miss Philbin is a rare type, the very 
ideal of innocence, and in spite of the ugly 



clothes she wore, her beauty was unmistak- 
able. Perhaps it is not beauty, let us say 
loveliness instead. It is a long and trying 
part essayed and she is subjected to those 
awful "close-ups" which really ought to be 
prohibited, or at least limited. Norman Ker- 
ry, as the dashing young officer, gives a 
splendid performance, only once in the en- 
tire picture failing to be convincing in his 
acting. His good looks and that subtle ar- 
istocratic arrogance so necessary for the role, 
are valuable assets. But to repeat, the pic- 
ture should not have been named "The Mer- 
rv-go-round." 



California 

We were a party of bachelors and spin- 
sters, and we had been dining rather well 
in the luxurious quarters of one of the for- 
mer whose Chinese cook has long kept his 
master's feet from straying toward the altar. 
^ hen the subject of moving pictures came 
up, the consensus of opinion was in favor 
of "Temporary Marriage" and we went en 
masse lo the California. The picture pre- 
sents a number of problems that persist in 
conjugal life, and our celibate bunch sat 
back <-oinfortably and contemplated the va- 
rious mix-ups of the poor married folk with 
considerable cheer. Kenneth Harlan is a de- 
lightful hero, and deserves a better fate than 
Myrtle Stedman who plays the heroine. Tully 
Marshall and Maude George are also in the 
cast, and Mildred Davis has a sweet ingenue 
role. In addition to the picture are the pop- 
ular dancers, Easter and Hazelton and Dor- 
othy Devore in a comedy called, "Winter 
Has Came." The California orchestra un- 
der the direction of Andrea Setaro render- 
ed a k, ell selected program. 



Orpheum 

Ben Bernie's here! And not alone this 
time, host in himself though he is. A twelve- 
piece orchestra accompanies his songs and 
the effect is excellent. Van and Schenk in 
then third week have a number of new songs 
and are received with rapturous applause. 
A more popular act has seldom been re- 
corded on Orpheum annals than that of the 
two clever, well-dressed, heartily spirited 
young singers whose repertoire is apparent- 



SAN FRANCISCO 



\w NAy©E<i\\.\* 




! 



M ™ s 25 and 50c 

EVENINGS 25c to $1.25 

Except Saturdays, Sundays and 
Holidays 



Always a Great Show 

Smoking Permitted In Dress Circle 
and Loges 



July 21, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



ly without limit. Anatol Friedland, his girls, 
his musicians, his personal aplombe and his 
unfailing gift of "hitting the spot" with the 
entertainment he provides, is with us again. 
Marguerite Padula sings several fetching lit- 
tle things in her "Song Study of Boys," and 
makes a pleasing impression. Aramand and 
Perz are strong men and do some astound- 
ing feats. 

Next week Theodore Roberts in person 
will be at the Orpheum. 



Alcazar 

One would think that about everything 
that could be done had many times been 
done with that seventy year old classic, "Un- 
cle Tom's Cabin," but the clever little Dun- 
can Sisters have surprised us by doing some- 
thing more. They have turned the old prop- 
aganda drama into a drama of modern mu- 
sical play and with tremendous success. Many 
of the traditions of "Uncle Tom" are main- 
tained, and many more innovations are sup- 
plied. The program informs us that "Topsy 
and Eva" is a musical comedy by Catherine 
Chisholm Cushing and that the music and 
lyrics are by the Duncan Sisters. Then the 
whole thing is by the talented sisters, for 
what is there but music and lyrics? A cer- 
tain Harriet Beecher Stowe wrote "Uncle 
Tom's Cabin" — as we all know. Just where 
Mrs. Cushing comes in is uncertain. A huge 
cast of twenty-five characters and a hun- 
dred others who sing and dance, present 
this unique show. Old Uncle Tom is quite 
splendidly portrayed by Basil Ruysdael, who 
has a dignity of presence and an excellent 
voice. George Shelby is well sung by Carl 
Gantvoort, but the acting is negligible and 
Mr. Gantvoort's idea of "a true Southern 
gentleman" is more sketchy, even, than that 
of his companions. The Simon Legree of 




WH EN y o u c o m e 
to Oakland, meet 
your friends in the 
commodious lobby of 
Hotel Oakland. Then 
luncheon, tea or din- 
ner in bur spacious 
dining rooms where 
i in' cuisine and service 
is unexcelled. 

Special attention given to 
dinner parties, banquets, 
and all social functions 



O T E 

W.C Jura ens MQr^| 




lorn Chatterton is a riot; surely such a bold, 
bad villain never cracked the whip as does 
this swaggering slave-driver. And lovely 
Nana Bryant gave a delightful performance 
of Mariette, her singing as sweet as her 
charming acting, and her looks as bonnie 
as a rose. Artistic to the last detail, Miss 
Bryant even knows how to pronounce "New 
Orleans." Netta Sunderland made a perfect 
Miss Ophelia, both looking and acting the 
part, and evidently having read the book. 
Topsy in the hands of Miss Rosetta Dun- 
can is a comical little black imp of mis- 
chief, while the angelic qualities of Little 
Eva are prettily portrayed by good little 
Duncan Sister, Miss Vivian. There are pick- 
aninnies and old-fashioned girls and lots of 
attractive music. The show is pleasing large 
houses at every performance. 



concert and the usual shorter film subjects 
are other program numbers. 



Orpheum 

The Orpheum, starting Sunday matinee, 
July 22, has as headline attraction Theo- 
dore Roberts, the famous Paramount char- 
acter actor. "The Man Higher Up," a bril- 
liant psychological drama written by Wm. C. 
De Mille, was the means of reintroducing Mr. 
Roberts to the stage about a year ago. Pearl 
Regay, the sensational dancer, is another 
Orpheum feature. Ben Bernie and his or- 
chestra of syncopaters who have met with 
great success during the past week, remain 
for another seven days. There is also to be 
a generous lot of comedy on the bill with 
Jce Morris and Flo Campbell and the Four 
Camerons as the chief funmakers. John Mor- 
ris, than whom there is no more popular 
comedian in vaudeville, brings a revised edi- 
tion of "The Avi-ate-her," assisted by his 
pretty partner. With an entertaining com- 
bination of instrumental music and comedy, 
Charles Sargent and John Marvin present 
a novelty. Paul Decker, who will be pleas- 
antly remembered for previous playlets, 
brings a new Edwin Burke comedy entitled 
"Doubt." It is replete in crisp lines and 
bright situations. A delightful pair are 
Chong and Rosie Moey, who started their 
stage careers in San Francisco, and who 
present a Chinese version of American songs 
and dances. 



Warfield Theater 

Ten stars, among the best known play- 
ers in motion pictures, will appear on the 
screen at Locw's Warfield Theater for the 
week commencing Saturday, July 21, in the 
production of Robert \Y. Chambers' great 
no\el, "The Common Law." This story, a 
version of which was presented many years 
ago in pictures, is given an entirely new- 
production in the present instance. 

This bill also marks the second week of 
Col. House and his Colorado Cowboy Band, 
who have fully justified during the past we?k 
the comments that "Something new in jazz 
has come to San Fr isco. 

Theodore Adolphus .nd Grace Eastman, 
ballet dancers, will appear in "An Artist's 
Dream." an artistic stage production. Lip- 
schultz and the Warneld Music Masters in 



"If Winter Comes" at the Columbia 

The formal opening of "If Winter Comes" 
took place Friday evening at 8:15 at the 
Columbia Theater. Everyone who has read 
this fascinating and nationally famous book 
will attend the world's premiere presenta- 
tion of Hutchinson's story with pleasurable 
anticipation. This play is a masterpiece of 
the screen, and no time, trouble or expense 
has been spared by the producers and di- 
rectors to make it ,a histrionic triumph. 



^Dinner 
dances 

New Rose Room Bowl 
orchestra under direc- 
tion of 

E. MAX BRADFIELD 
Dinner dances every 
eve. except Sunday. No 
cover chg., except Sat, 
Cover chg. Sat. eve. 50c, 

, Taw* , 

d'hote dinner ' 
$l.«o 
a person 

<Jiho a la carle 
service 





Hie 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

CsiianQgement 

HALSEY E.MANWARJNO 



Cafe Marquard 

GEARY AND MASON STREETS 
Telephone Prospect 61 

Vi-it.,r, In San Francisco DeliKht In the 
Cay Bohemian Atmosphere, the Enter- 
tainment and Danetnp. the Rare Quality 
of Food and Courteous Service 



LUNCHEON 

Continental Style 

Tw»nty-six Delicious Dishes. Prepared 

and Served So Differently 



DINNER 



Every Evening — Six to Nine 
Also Select a la Carte 



Dancing and Cabaret 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 21, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklio and Gourh 
Telephone Park 211 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



1140 Geury Street 



Tel. Franklin SOUS 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Mctul W.irL \ i>piTf it i ni nc In A iitumtiltlleH 

Oxy-Acetylene tVeldinjr — ISIuckamHIiliifc 

II. W. Culver M. l>ut>erer 12. Johnson 




Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



The Brtish Rubber Act 

Speaking at a general meeting of the 
Rubber Plantations Investment Trust, Ltd., 
in London, Chairman Welch of the organi- 
zation pointed to the benefits accrued since 
the going into effect of the British rubber 
act. Excessive stocks have been reduced, 
supplies have been restricted and prices 
nearly doubled, he said, enumerating what 
his organization regards as favorable effects 
of the restriction. 

Last year the world absorbed approxi- 
mately 375,000 tons of rubber, of which 
America accounted for nearly 75 per cent. 
This was a total increase in absorption of 
115,000 tons over 1921 of which Ameri- 
can firms took 100,000 tons. While the re- 
striction act was regarded by the investment 
trust as a highly favorable piece of legis- 
lation, it was shown that a stronger demand, 
in relation to current supply, is necessary to 
create an entirely favorable set of circum- 
stances. 

Autoirobile Greatest Business Factor 

Roger W. Babson of New York, when 
asked this week as to what is the greatest 
factor with which the banker, manufacturer 
and merchant must reckon during the next 
20 years, replied, "automobiles." He said 
further: 

"The automobile industry is largely re- 
sponsible for the condition of business today. 
The fact that the Babson chart stands at 
one per cent above normal compared with 
I 7 per cent below a year ago, is due largely 
to the automobile industry. When one con- 
siders that during the first six months of 
1923 most states will show as many new 
registrations as during all of 1922, it is re- 
markable that business has not boomed more. 
The only answer is that people have bought 
automobiles instead of buying something else 
—that is, the sales of other things have 
fallen off correspondingly. The law of ac- 
tion and reaction is absolute. Now, what 
will be the reaction of a new generation 
which knows not the joy of walking?" 



Revised figures en truck production show 
that in May 42,983 motor trucks were pro- 
duced, against 37,527 in April, and 23,788 
in Way, 1922. 




LA LA XX 10 



J. BAIIKIOKI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL. 

5 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

(ii,r» ri >< niLi-: i >(>G. 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

$1.25 French Dinner 
Served Daily Except 
Sunday From 5 p. m. 
to 9 p. ni. 

AIho A La Curie 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an I-Jnameled paint jot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1056 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT ISEST SKKVKS THE PUBLIC 
UK ST SERVES US 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 

FREE 

In a hijih class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboirc & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 5S0 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEI, ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



St Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PER- 
SONAL PROPERTY 

Under Sections 1861, 18(ila and 1863, Civil Code 
of the State of California 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

Notice is hereby given that on Friday, 
August 10. 1923, at the hour of 12 o'clock 
M. of said day, in the baggage room of 
the premises of what is known as the Clift 
Hotel, situate at the South East corner of 
Geary and Taylor Streets in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, the undersigned will sell at public 
auction, for cash in Gold Coin of the Unit- 
ed States, the following described personal 
property: 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 40 inches high, in- 
itialed A. E. J. 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 44 inches high. 

1 Hat trunk (black) 26 inches high, initialed 
A. E. J. 

Contents of above trunks wearing apparel. 

1 Wooden box containing books. 

1 Large package containing articles of wear- 
ing apparel. 

7 Hat boxes containing hats. 

1 Suit box containing clothing. 

1 Shoe box containing shots. 

1 shoe box containing empty boxes. 

1 Gentleman's hat box containing various ar- 
ticles. 

1 Flower basket. 
being the property of Mrs. Carrie B. Johnston, 
Sacramento, California, The said auction and 
sale win if made under and by virtue of the 
pro visions of Sections L861, L8Gla and L862 of 
the Civil Code of the State of California for the 
purpose of satisfying the lien of the under- 
signed on said personal property in the sum of 
$7in.i 5, together with the costs of said Bale, 
said lien being an innkeeper's lien Eor the proper 
charges due from said Carrie B, Johnston for 
her accommodation, board and lodging and room 
rent, and for Buch extras as were furnished to 
her- ;it her request and Cor moneys paid out tor 
and advanced to her. 

Dated San Francisco, California, June 22, 1928. 
CLIFT HOTEL CO., 
By Frederick C. Clift, 
President and Managing Director 
\ | BERT l- 1 il >EB, Attorney at Lan 
202-203 Crocker, Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




practice limited to 


EVE 


BAR, NOSE AND THROAT 




10 to 5 — By Appointment — 


Saturday 


10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Homo 


ve«l to Suite SS7 Mebes Bide. 




17 7 POST STHEET 




San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit* Fnmati. by Hand, Only — 
Suit* Culled for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

I'nri.lnn Hyelnit and Cleanlnr 
43S Hut, S(. Phon. rr.nklln tSlt 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 

COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
Ihe new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vlgoroiU hninhtnir once 
or twice a duy is taking very Rood care 
of them. Itru-liini: in only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen lo your 
teeth which only a competent dentUt can 
take care of. I!a%e your teeth examined. 
They nn»\ nut be as vnund a« you imagine. 
A toothache mean'* trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and rum". 
There are (turn trouble* that will deatroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? I>o your rum<< bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. II will rn-t Mthln*. My 
nerve blocking «.y*leni block* off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

•THAT CAREFTSX DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

rhnne (.arfleld 835 

BPKCIAUSTB — Extractions : Crown*; 
Self ( I?nn*lni Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



VISIT 


"The 


Cataeomos 


AT 


CYPRESS LAWN 


MEMORIAL PARK 


City Office: 995 Market Street 


San Francisco 


Phones: 
Sutter 695 .Douglas 4772 


Perpetual Care Fund 

On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 6G Geary Street San Francisco 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seem* necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San FrancUco 





1865 



LARKINS 

AUTOMOBILE 

PAINTING 




A paint job will improve the looks of your car and 
add materially to its value. 

Instead of trading in the old car get an estimate 
from us on how much it will cost to make it luck 
like new. 

The quality of our work is known to the automobile 
public of San Francisco. 



L 



LARKINS & CO. 



First Ave. and Geary 



Makers of the LARKINS TOP 



Established July 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAIN rKAIN^lDWJ 



California Advertiser 

SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1923 





$5.00 PER YEAR 
OS ANGELI 



> A\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V\\\\N\N\\\\\\\\\\N\\\\\N\\S>\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V/ 



/ 




/WWV*NVXXV< 



tH fr **i m t/lflt m ■ t/\f* ■> ■ ittft l* f /\f* » t tl ty* 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



WALTER W. DERR 

,105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haishtand Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH. West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4^4) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Reserve Now Your Bonds 

For Reinvestment of July Funds 



Not one day's interest need be lost in 
reinvestment or purchasing securities 
with money that is soon available. 



You may choose your investment and 
make your reservation with us now 
for the day on which your funds are 
ready. 
Let Us Send You Our List for July Investment 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



San Francisco 
Sansome Street 



Oakland 

709 Syndicate 

Bldg. 



Los Angeles 

203 Baltlett 

Bldg. 



New York 
Wall Street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital S15.000.000 115,000,000 Beserve, Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




YELLOW PENCIL 
'toUh the. RED BAND 
^EAGLEPENCILCO. NEWYORK.U.SA. 






N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 1 6 San Bruno, Cal. 

—NOTICE— 

Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Montgomery St., between 
Sutter and Bush Sts. 

Special Dinner on 
Sundays, $1.00 

Food excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining Room 

Prices Reasonable 

You are bound to be pleased when you 

oat at THE CLUB GRILL 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days S1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays..? 1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



ti $ / *mim *Hp»mm^i* ' w *J\f—*** 




EtUMI*hed July f 0, 1534 

fIB 

Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 





vol. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, JULY 28, 1923 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 : Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



We 



now see l 



— It is said the new broom sweeps clean 
a Dolley may operate said broom successfully. 

— General Gouraud is the typical man for a soldier's hero wor- 
ship. Simple minded and intellectual at the same time, he appeals 

to the imaginative and the patriotic. 

* * * 

— At last the head of a university asks that the collegian, male 
or female, uses his or her brains, instead of his or her biceps, which 
is a good thing, especially over at the U. C. 

— Jos. W. Hays, Combustion Engineer, makes the statement that 
"Our coal will be gone in 100 years." Well, a good many of us 
will consider coal a superfluous article even by that time, in the 

place we are in. 

* * * 

— Miss Agnes McKenna, expert on color, makes the assertion 
that "over half the divorces in the United States are caused by in- 
harmonious color combinations in the dining room." How about 

colors in the bedroom? 

* * * 

— Another film marriage ending in a year of not unalloyed bliss. 
William Wellman, the poet, says Helene Chadwick. deserted his 
bride, in 1921, and that he has not provided for her support. These 
little disagreements and more than temperamental difficulties seem 
to beset stars and poets. 

— "Only one thing is evident at the present moment, and that 
is, the collapse of Germany will be the defeat of everybody and the 
extinction of all hope of Reparations. Adventurous politicians and 
soldiers may fish in the troubled waters that will follow, but for all 
others it will be a scene of desolation." So says the Westminster 

Gazette. 

* * * 

—We always said that Nellie Pierce was driving her horses a 
little hard. Now she is going too fast even for the governor, as his 
rebuke with her interference with the state librarian seems to show. 
The bother arose over two blind assistants whom she wanted dis- 
charged. What has Nellie got against the blind? One of the earliest 
charges against her economic policy was that she was depriving 
the blind at the Berkeley institution of their braile books. Blind 
people seem to be small game when there is so much bigger stuff 
to go after. 



— The farmers who want the Government to hoard wheat for 
them in years of plentiful crops and low prices, and throw this 
wheat on the market in lean periods have evidently not canvassed 
the Brazilian coffee valorization and its many defects. To be sure, 
the grower makes money, but everyone else pays for it. 

— One of the most astonishing things that one notes in a trip 
down the Coast by way of Pescadero is the very slight use to which 
the beaches are put. Anywhere else, and they would be an actual 
treasure mine. In Europe they would be famous for all time. Here 
they don't seem to count. Probably lack of population supplies 
the reason. Some day they will be known everywhere. 
* * * 

— Where do the immigrants go? According to the Trade Rec- 
ord of the National City Bank of New York, of the 1 4,000.000 per- 
sons of foreign birth now living in the United States, about 5,000,000 
are residents of the upper Mississippi Valley, 5,000,000 in the Mid- 
dle Atlantic States, 2,000,000 in New England, about 1 ,000,000 in 
the South, and approximately a half million on the Pacific Coast. 

— The filming of McTeague incurs a trip to "Dante's Inferno," 
which is, in this case, Death Valley, at the foot of the Panamint 
range; and this in the month of August! This spot is a hideous 
sink of alkali, iniquitous and malignant, in which a single clump 
of sage brush would fascinate the eye. The temperature will be 
I 72' i in the shade. Nine gallons of water will have to be supplied 
to each man daily, and 15 to the mules. Cars must be built for the 
trip with special axles, so the grease will not run out like water. 
It is not all a bed of roses for the movie stars! 

— "Every man has a pack of old trash discommodin' his soul," 

says a character in the book "Fiery Particles." "An' the whole of it 

made of the dirt in the fields, a month or two back. It's what he's 

come out of. And what he goes back into being. Aye, and what 

lie can't do without having, as long as he lasts. And yet it's not 

he. And yet he must keep a fast hold on it always, or else he'll 

be dead. And yet I'll engage he'll have to be fighting it always — 

it and the sloth it would put on the grand venomous life he has in 

him. God help us, it's difficult." 

* * * 

— A San Francisco girl writing from Berlin says that she care- 
lessly changed two million marks in excess of her needs. She says, 
"We are spending these two days trying to eat it up to the horror 
of a little German girl who has not seen such beefsteaks since she 
was thirteen, when the war came." A sentence like that tells more of 
the conditions in Europe than whole pages of learned talk. It is 
the same in all these things, we need more than anything else actual 
contact to enable us to grasp facts. Otherwise we are hopeless. 
F„i example, we don't think anybody outside California could un- 
derstand Chester Rowell. and it keeps us guessing. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




in the same condition as Austria. The situation has cleared a bit 
temporarily, but the barometer is still falling, falling. 



We really do like to say a good word for a 
The Fish Commission political body now and again, though our 

benevolent desires have little chance as a rule 
of fulfilment, for, it will be conceded, that as a rule political bodies 
are not such as inspire respect and the work of the politician wi.ll 
not bear any close investigation. Such being the case, we have all 
the greater pleasure in bearing witness to the work of the Fish 
and Game Commission, to whose good offices we owe the fact 
that there is any game left in the state at all. This commission has 
recently won an important victory in Siskiyou County where Judge 
C. J. Luttrell has upheld the right of the state to compel owners 
of~r and tcr install sueens so as to prevent fish from entering and 
being carried on to the land. The Parker Company, a corporation 
which owns some three thousand acres of irrigated land in Scott 
Valley, has been enjoined from operating its irrigation canals and 
ditches until it has put the screens in. The water which the Parker 
Company used in irrigating came from one of the tributaries of 
the Klamath River and is practically the last reserve place of the 
king salmon and the rainbow trout. The case is, therefore, one of 
great public interest and engaged the attention of all lovers of fish 
and fishing. This case brings another to the front, wherein the Elec- 
tric Metals Company is asking for an extension of time within 
which to divert water from the Klamath River. This petition is be- 
ing opposed by the Fish and Game Commission. The more one 
digs into the history of the California rivers, the greater the amount 
of fraud which is unveiled. The Fish Commission is doing a fine 
work and should be supported. 



Britain has spoken and the clouds in the Ruhr 
Clouds Are Clearing? are beginning to clear. Poincare foamed at 

the mouth and made sweeping gestures and 
all the official papers did likewise. The story passed and the sa- 
gacious voice of the master compromisers, the British statesmen, 
begin to be heard. France is really sick of it; she wants a way 
out, without too much hurt pride. The Ruhr expedition has been 
an unmitigated failure in every way — as regards delivery of coke 
and as regards the operation of the French steel works in Lorraine. 
Therefore, said the English, "Let us tell the Germans that they must 
stop the passive resistance and then the French will get out without 
further ado." Latest news shows that this is just what will happen. 
The Germans will, at the request of Britain, say that they don't ap- 
prove of passive resistance. The French will, thereupon, say that, this 
being the case, they won't intrude, which when you come to look at 
it, is quite a bit silly and then they will see how much Germany can 
pay and proceed to get it. And then it will be all right — will it? You 
have noticed the case of Austria, and how the loan was subscribed so 
rapidly for Austria. One might say, therefore, that Austria is re- 
habilitating herself and that the Austrians are coming out through the 
mess. Austrian finance may be rehabilitating itself, but conditions 
in Austria are dreadful; poverty is rampant and prices have risen 
inordinately. All that has happened is that Austria has been brought 
into the circle of the high finance which controls the movements of 
the League of Nations. That is all. It is enough; for it is ranging 
against the League those vast organizations which see no hope in 
existing Europe and which want to sweep the chessmen into the dis- 
card. The League, under the new British scheme, will put Germany 



Magnus Johnson of Minnesota, at one time a 
The Minnesota Scare Swedish artisan, and at present owner and 

worker of a hundred and forty acre farm, 
which liis wife and two sons cultivate, has been elected to the Senate 
of the United States, one of the most important offices in the world 
today. This is a new departure. We have had radical movements 
before, such as the Populist, but they always sent men to Congress 
who were by education and training members of the intellectual 
classes. But, here is a man who is admittedly a stranger to all of the 
amenities of modern life. He does not wear a collar; he is unkempt 
in his personal appearance; he can not speak good English, but talks 
brokenly like the uneducated Swede that he is. And all the metro- 
politan papers are full of gibes and insults. That is too easy and 
stupid, for the same people made the same mistake about Lincoln. 
There must be some unusual power or strength in that man Johnson, 
which enabled him to get an office of that sort in spite of the fearful 
opposition that he must have met. The circumstances were in his 
favor; that is very true, wheat at a dollar would make a farmer vote 
for almost anybody. Still, that Johnson should have been the spokes- 
man shows that, at least, he has a certain vigorous ability, which will 
bear watching. He may be but the first of a number of his kind, who 
driven by the poor prices and the hardness of the farmer's life, may 
go to Washington to try conclusions with the men whom they call 
the "financiers." Not that they will necessarily get anywhere, but it 
will make a very interesting historical episode in our national life 
and will be the pivotal question of the immediate future. 



According to reports received from Alaska 
The Bureaucracy Evil where the President has been investigating 

the conditions and hearing petitions from 
the inhabitants with respect to their hard lot, it appears that the 
country is tied up with a messy sort of bureaucracy which paralyzes 
effort and renders progress impossible. There is a statement made — 
how far it is actually true we do not know, and it really does not 
matter very much, that there are no less than 128 government de- 
partments concerned in the administration of that unhappy country 
and that nobody knows what they are permitted to do, and what not. 
Under such conditions, of course, all initiative is fettered, and in a 
new country like Alaska, which demands and requires the energetic 
independence of strong and adventurous men, the results are just 
fatal. The same tendency is manifesting itself here. The power 
which the city holds by virtue of the completion of the Hetch Hetchy 
dam, like the primitive resources of Alaska, may be of inestimable 
value to the world, but along come the labor organizations, and the 
reformers who urge that it be placed in the hands of a city bureau. 
Does it not seem as if the same results will flow from bureaucracy 
here, as came from it in Alaska? How many times have men to be 
taught that a bureau is no substitute for initiative and enterprise? 



Californians, Inc., is actually becoming known 
Californians, Inc. and more than that, is putting things over, which, 

with all politeness, we may urge has not been by 
any means the universal habit of organizations that have undertaken 
to develop the population of the state. But there is something new 
and vigorous about this later development which is of good omen, 
and which seems very likely to achieve the objects that it has set out 
to accomplish. How important those objects are to the development 
and well-being of the community, only those can appreciate who have 
thought the matter over. What we need is a good reliable popula- 
tion composed of such people as may be trusted to progress in a sane 
and conservative manner and, by their labor and activity, intellectual 



July 28. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



as well as physical, contribute to the general well-being. We have 
the land, we have all the natural wealth necessary to such develop- 
ment, and we are held back only by a lack of population, particu- 
larly in the northern part of the state, which, for some reason or 
other, has not been well enough advertised. 

The Californians, Inc., bid fair to do away with the disadvantage 
under which we have so far labored and to put us in the way of get- 
ting that population which we need. More than that, they seem to be 
effecting their purposes and their publicity must be conceded to be 
both able and voluminous. That solves the problem; publicity is all 
we need for we have everything else. The conclusion is, therefore, 
obvious that the Californians, Inc. should receive every possible 
support. 



The value of building permits issued in San 
The American Plan Francisco during the three months ending June 
Spreading 30th, 1923, amounted to $14,316,133; as 

compared to $1 1 ,707,487 for the same period 
in 1922, a difference of $2,608,646; and this in spite of the fact 
that the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics shows an increase 
of 26 per cent in prices of building materials since May of 1922. 
During the last two months there has been a slight drop of about 
2 per cent. Anyone who uses his observing powers realizes that 
there is a building boom in San Francisco, and if he is able to put 
two and two together, he can conclude that this boom is due, in 
great measure to the instituting of the "American Plan," a plan 
which the News Letter fostered for years, and which, translated 
into words of one syllable, means "the right of a man to work." 
That this same plan which has brought a period of building activity 
to a city that heretofore was lariated, hobbled and branded by 
"Unionism," is being noted and approved by the larger cities of 
the United States, is evident from a letter written by Mr. Russell 
R. Whitman, President of the New York "Commercial," to the In- 
dustrial Association of San Francisco, in which he says: 

"I know that New York needs an association like that of San 
Francisco, for conditions here are about as bad as they could be, 
and they never will be remedied in my opinion until New York 
wakes up and goes at the matter aggressively, the way you people 
did." 

The American Plan has been especially successful in the build- 
ing trades, but it is gradually gaining favor amongst other unions, 
the men themselves, freed from the autocratic rulings of their mas- 
ters, the labor officials, at last cognizant of the bondage under which 
they have been toiling. 

On April 19, 1923, the warehouse industry of San Francisco, 
involving the handling and storing of non-perishable food supplies, 
established the American Plan, the issue being precipitated by a 
strike when a demand for an increase of fifty cents per day was 
rejected. The Industrial Association, upon investigation, found that 
the minimum wage was $4.50 per day for un-skilled men, the semi- 
skilled men receiving from $5.00 to $6.50 per day, and that work- 
ing conditions and hours were just and fair. On May 18th. just a 
month afterwards, the men voted to call off the strike and return 
to work under American Plan conditions. 

At this writing, more than 200 stevedores and warehouse men 
loading steamers at Port Costa and Islais Creek, have gone on strike 
after a demand for an increase in wages from 80 cents to $1.00 
an hour had been refused. Union officials of the Riggers and Steve- 
dores Union, state that this walk-out is unauthorized, and was not 
voted by the union, but was the work of men on the various jobs, 
after several demands for an increase had been denied, and lay it 
to the machinations of the 1. W. W. Possibly ,t is all part of some 
foreign organization and will be settled speedily, for we believe 
that the majority of the American workers have come to look upc^ 
the American Plan as the solution of all labor problems. 




By ANTISTHENES 

Beauty, mostly, is only cosmetic deep. 



Six or seven supervisors are on annual vacation — in addition to 
the one they enjoyed at Hetch Hetchy. 



In line with modern trend, religion is now being served a la cafe- 
teria, with hell seldom appearing on the menu. 



Prohibition didn't harm California vineyardists. Formerly we 
bought them by the bunch; now we buy grapes by the grape. 



The line of questions being answered every Sunday evening by a 
prominent clergyman illustrates how far God is being divorced from 
religion. 



Convict David Caplin, connected with the Times Building dyna- 
miting, states he will take up tonsorial work. Chances are he'll not 
be barber to the Times editor. 



Not enough men to go around in Jugo-Slavia, so lady member 
of parliament proposes each should have two wives. Excellent start 
for another war in the Balkans. 



Obsolete horse-drawn vehicles in the street cleaning department 
will be with us until we hew the evil tree that bears one of the few 
remaining non-civil service plums of patronage. 



John Soudas, escaped convict who cut a woman's throat in Se- 
attle, has been captured after working as a barber for two years in 
San Francisco. Safety razors should be in greater demand hence- 
forth. 

Why are two nice positions — non-civil service, of course — in 
Sheriff Finn and Assessor Ginty's offices called "confidential"? The 
charter states that all books and records shall, at all times, be open 
to the public! 



It cost us $30,321.28 for athletic stunts in the school department 
for the year. What a pile of vacant lots are yearning for a cleanup 
by our able-bodied schoolboys — but that wouldn't be popular with 
mentors nor pupils. 



We are not far removed from the ways of kingdoms. Today our 
rulers take pleasant jaunts at taxpayers' expense on the alibi of pro- 
moting public interests; of old. kings spurned this subterfuge — just 
levied tribute to pay for the outings. 



McSheehy objects to the municipality's appropriating money for 
Californians, Inc. Why. Mac. they want to advertise the Utopian 
city you promise us if elected mayor — not a word about your pic- 
nicing in Hetch Hetchy at the city expense. 



According to one statistician with a penchant for digging into 
facts, if McSheehy puts into effect all the improvements he prom- 
ises when elected mayor, the tax rate will be 5.21 ! Since it now is 
3.47, how about that reduction, Mac? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




By KEM 

"How can one read all the books one ought to, when one 
hasn't e\en time to read the ones one ought not to?" — Life. 

THE foregoing question is one sadly voiced by busy people in 
these days of many activities, but below is a list of some of 
the books one ought to read if fortunate enough to get a vacation 
that will put one in the mood for popular spring and summer fav- 
orites : 

"Madame Claire" by Susan Ertz. Novel, giving a mellow view 
of modern English society and sophisticated, and young love. Ap- 
pleton, $2. 

"Mainspring" by V. H. Friedlander. Well written novel of a 
modern girl who weighs love and a career on the scales and then 
chooses what most meets her need. Putnam, $2. 

"His Children's Children" by Arthur Train. Modern New York 
family life with a jolt for the parents. Scribner's. $2. 

"The Lord of Thundergate" by H. Small. Story of an American 
masquerader, well told — with both Eastern and Western thrills. — 
Bobbs-Merrill, $2. 

"The Dim Lantern" by Temple Bailey. Well told Washington 
City Romance for readers who have (or have kept) young enthu- 
siams. Penn. $2. 

"Ponjola" by Cynthia Stockley — A South African romance. Put- 
nam. $2. 

"Enchanted April." A story, smilingly told by "Elizabeth," of a 
vacation away from husbands and cares under sunny Italian skies. 
Doubleday. $1.90. 

"Faint Perfume" by Zona Cale. Modern girl and love in misfit 
surroundings. Appleton. $1.75. 

"Letters of Walter H. Page." American History given in intimate 
revealing letters. Doubleday, Page. $10. 

"Every life has its 'mine with the iron door' — its dreams .... its 
hopes " 

THE MINE WITH THE IRON DOOR by Harold Bell Wright is 

just out this week. It is romance in and around the Catalina Moun- 
tains, in Arizona, given in Mr. Wright's usual simple, sincere style 
that pleases his long list of appreciative readers. Hildegard Haw- 
thorne, granddaughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne, tells us in a little 
booklet just why the men in the trenches, the lonely men and wo- 
men on farms, the human beings in cities, towns and little villages, 
love Harold Bell Wright books. It is because the author is "A real 
man, a hard worker, a man of intense convictions and compelling 
love of humanity. A man who has known the hard and lonely ways 
of life and come through them sound to the core. A man capable 
of strong and lasting friendships, loving the beauty of nature, even 
under her wildest and sternest aspects, an outdoor man." 
Appleton. $2. 

THE NIGHT OF THE WEDDING by A. M. and C. N. Williamson 
is in the usual mysterious, romantic "Williamson" vein — and the 
bride who vanishes the night of her wedding is the prettiest, the 
unique old English house where she disappears the most astonish- 
ing, and the villain the most resourceful of their many novels, so 
it promises good thrilling reading. 



Now that the city has provided a magnificent free residence for 
the fire chief, other politicians feel the urge of free rent. Why not 
build a municipal hotel where all might dwell together in unity? 




UJiO. W. CASWELL 

Telephone Direct 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

1,800,000 cups were Nerved at the Pao- 

ama-Paclflc International Exposition. 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



VJaidL^ 5 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEI, FITE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Ave. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY. 

NEW YORK 



*The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 
239 Post Street 



PAUL ELDER'S 



San Francisco 



July 28, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



:(z::ii 



Bears— A Good Word For "Nobody's Friend 



•>•> 



By R. BERKELEY 



BHfflaaBlii@@gE@ssgiaSi!lg=3@^ 






THE under dog always appeals to me; less, perhaps, because he 
is the under dog than because the majority favor the top dog. It 
is so easy to be top dog, and you cannot respect a position easy of 
attainment. In security markets, the bull is certainly the top dog, 
allowing the bear an occasional run only — as the cat permits the 
mouse — in order to derive added satisfaction from "squeezing" him. 
From time immemorial, too, the short seller has been the butt of the 
ignorant, his transactions anathema. 

Short sales are as old as Esau, a much-maligned individual, who 
— poor devil — sold an inheritance he did not own to his crafty 
brother, who had him in a tight place. They are no more to be con- 
demned than the action of the farmer who sells his crop before even 
the seed is sown, or than the common practice of the publisher who 
makes life a burden by sending pitiful specimens of humanity, of all 
ages and both sexes, to my door, begging me to pay for newspapers 
that may or may not publish events that may or may not have hap- 
pened when chronicled. Both "sell short" something which they hope 
to be able to obtain later at a price lower than that which they got 
from some more or less weak-minded purchaser. Short sales are both 
old and ordinary — age-old, commonplace. "Selling short" means only 
that, by the use of credit, delay in delivery of the thing that is 
bought later is effected. Incidentally, every seller is eventually a 
buyer, a bear is a bull in embryo. How many people keep this in 
mind? 

I can understand the prejudice against Bruin. He is regarded as a 
pessimist, though really a cheerful brute. And no one loves the pes- 
simist. But though prejudice explains, it does not justify unthinking 
abuse. Your bear may not seem always to be "acting pretty," but 
he rarely injures anyone except himself. Now and again much paper 
and ink are dissipated in the effort to prove that short selling injures 
intrinsic values; lurid pen pictures being drawn to show the wide- 
spread ruin that follows in the trail of the bear. It is nonsense, but 
all do not know this. No short seller born ever managed to reduce 
real values, to even influence output or demand for goods. The most 
he can do is to depress prices for a short time— until he becomes 
himself a factor in raising them by buying for delivery. 

Short sellers are really very useful members of society. They are a 
part of the machine (the "longs" the other part), that assures an 
even balance; playing an essential part in securing a fair price for 
the security that is in the weighing. Speculative selling corrects an 
inaccurate price as much as speculative buying. A price may be 
higher than conditions warrant, as well as lower. Short selling is as 
much a stabilizing influence as buying; equally beneficial, too— un- 
due inflation of prices being as dangerous in an economic sense as 
undue depression. 

Short sales are more than useful. They are necessary to a balanced 
and organized market. The case of the odd-lot dealer furnishes an 
example. He can no more do his job without selling short than he 
could without taking the long side. And it is the small investors to 
whom the odd-lot dealer renders his service; he is their good fairy. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservation* at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

T<.l«.phon. Butter tlio Lnder Management CARL S. STANLEY 



Without short selling, how could the small investor be assured a pur- 
chase whenever he wished for it? If the odd-lot dealer is to sell 
whether he has anything to sell or not, he must often be guilty of 
the "nefarious" practice of short selling. I hate to punch my enemy's 
head in chancery, but if he will put it there, "sua culpa." And the 
inveigher against short selling is doing this all the time. 

What is necessary is not always regarded as beneficial. But a 
"short interest" (made up of those who have sold short and are 
waiting to cover their sales) renders often a most valuable service 
to investors by affording much-needed support to a falling market. 
At such times the ordinary investor and, more so, perhaps, (for 
obvious reasons), the buyers "on margin" get scared, and are dis- 
posed to rush to sell — because in many cases they have no choice in 
the matter. It is the wicked short who saves the skin of the lamb, 
by covering his own previous sales. In the eventful days of 1914, 
it was, as all know (except those who prefer ignorance), the short 
interest that was responsible for the widely commented on resistance 
of prices for which San Franciscans, in degree only less than New 
Yorkers, had cause to be thankful. We have, on the other hand, an 
instance of the consequences of the absence of a short interest; in 
1920, there was no such valuable aid to halt the decline of wool and 
leather prices, the consequent slump in the prices of which spelled to 
many innocent persons undeserved calamity, to banks that had dis- 
counted bills secured by high-priced stocks, even less deserved diffi- 
culties of a serious nature. These are but two proven facts of his- 
tory, sufficiently recent to have remained in the memories of even the 
"wits shorts" of the political arena. 

Like the poor, the ill-informed critics are always with us. Our 
local exchange, the San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange, is not 
spared; and when prices are moving in a direction opposite to that 
desired by those whose business is transacted there, we hear much 
talk about "bear raids," and many are the cries raised for some strong 
man to take a hand in putting a stop to sins that exist only in the 
imagination of the weepers by the waters of "Babylon." San Fran- 
cisco is no Babylon, and the governing board of the Stock and Bond 
Exchange is strong enough to deal with any circumstances that may 
call for intervention. That such rarely arise is due to the steady, 
albeit silent and unobserved, watchfulness it exercises — always in the 
interests of a public that, knowing little and too often listening to 
malevolent gossip, vouchsafes its protectors little or no gratitude. 

Be that as it may, I hope I have in the short space available pre- 
sented a sufficiently strong "case for the defense" of those cute little 
bears who are so frequently and so unfairly attacked. 



In the Dearborne Independent, photos of the resignation ban- 
quet tendered to Lasker, resigned head of the Shipping Board, 
at which President Harding presided, show many of the service 
glasses filled with dark material. Some of the uncharitable will 
say this was forbidden fruit juice. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van »•• Ave., at Geary Street B V N FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

EI..MXR M. WOODBIRY Manarer 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 



ToWNPiLCRIER 




} WHO THE DEWLART THOU 

"ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
j pEWL,S/ffWITH VOW 

Shahspeare- , 



— There has been nothing nastier done by the Hearst papers than 
occurred in the Examiner on Sunday. There it was practically stated 
that the British have committed a fraud on the United States by the 
fortification of Singapore, and the whole article was intended to 
show bad faith and to stir up strife. Everybody knows that Singa- 
pore was expressly excluded from the agreement with respect to 
fortifications in the Orient, and that the British dismantled their 
ancient and powerful fortifications at Hong Kong. Hearst has no 
sense of decency. It was because of this sort of caddishness that 
he was not allowed to meet the king in London, and that all the 
notice he received was an invitation to one of Lloyd George's po- 
litical breakfasts. His pride is so hurt that he throws the crockery 
about. 



— If you look at the shop windows you will be astonished at the 
numbers of bead necklaces for sale. This does not apply only to the 
large stores but the same is true of the beauty parlors and even 
small jewelers. Beads of all colors and of all varieties meet your 
eye at every turn. This would seem to imply that the demand is 
very heavy and, as a matter of fact, it appears from the govern- 
ment returns that over $10,000,000 have been imported within nine 
months. What should have caused this sudden desire of the women 
for squaw ornamentation is so far unexplained. That and the turn 
for jazz are distinct evidences of a return to savagery, subconscious 
perhaps, but evidential of an inherent disgust with modern civiliza- 
tion. 



— All sorts of reasons are given for divorce. Thus, a local clerk, 
occupying a prominent position, has brought suit upon the ground 
that his wife made him eat in the kitchen. Without commenting 
upon a case before the court, this strikes us as funny. In the first 
place how the dickens could he be made to eat anywhere? And, 
secondly, if he ate in the kitchen, he got cooked food, which is a 
treat to some of us these days, when the delicatessen store is such 
a feature and our meals come to us in little cardboard boxes. Then 
again quite a lot of us have no kitchens in these apartment times. 
It seems as if the complaint were a little ungrateful. 



— It is rather a joke on the police department that a woman, and 
an amateur at that, should have discovered the great store of stolen 
household property in the Richmond district. About a hundred thou- 
sand dollars worth of property taken from houses by a house-painter 
was discovered in his home. A shot gun having been taken from 
the house of a woman, she hunted the pawnshops till she found it 
and, with it, all this Aladdin cave of stolen goods. The police had 
declared themselves baffled, but it would have seemed almost ele- 
mentary to investigate the pawnships. Really, chief, it is rather 
one on the force, isn't it? 



— The discovery of oil at Half Moon Bay may open up prospects 
for a development of the great industry in the North. The South 
has had the oil and the money but our turn may be coming. Who 
knows? At any rate there is a chance of excitement and in the 
meantime those who own property within a reasonable distance 
of the strike will be in the highest pitch of anticipation. It is a 
thing like that that makes us know that the West is still the West 
and that there are elements of chance of a fortune which the older 
parts of the country have to go without. These things keep us young. 



— Did you know that we had a municipal officer rejoicing in the 
title of "Director of the San Francisco Bureau of Governmental 
Research"? How is that for Prussian? Get a friend to translate it 
into German for you and see how its sounds and then repeat his 
wife's title in German beginning "Direkorin," etc., and you will im- 
agine that the Kaiser won the war and wish that Baron von Schroe- 
der were back again. But really it is a very useful office and tends 
to saving in municipal buying. Would you ever have thought that 
so much could mean so little? But it is worth while. The director's 
name is William H. Nanry, and he has been back learning about 
cheap buying. He says that centralization in city government is 
the order of the day in the East. We shall follow suit. How much 
does it cost? I think I would like to be a director and take trips 
East to study cheap buying. 



— Times are getting steep for the I. W. W. Ten go to jail in 
one day and at the same time an injunction is issued and there must 
be pretty nearly a hundred of them in San Quentin. When the 
history of these times comes to be written there will be much per- 
plexity on the part of the historian to account for this phenomenon 
in our state at a time when prosperity was as obvious as it is now, 
and the laboring classes so well off. We don't pretend to guess at 
it, and we should have much greater faith in modern psychology 
if its exponents would give a rational explanation. Meanwhile it is 
an unmitigated nuisance. 



— The failure of the Morosco Holding Company, which has ap- 
plied for a receiver, is rather a sad thing to those of us who re- 
member the gallant fight that Oliver Morosco has put up in the face 
of the almost deadly competition of the moving picture industry. 
He is so closely connected with California and San Francisco that 
we whose younger days were many times gladdened by his enter- 
tainments, cannot help feeling an unusual regret at the misfortune 
which has come upon his later efforts. It is all so horribly uncertain 
that we have to concede sympathy at least, never knowing when we 
may need it. 



— Why should a wife beater who happens to be an attorney and 
is sentenced for domestic brutality to twenty-eight days in jail, be 
allowed to furnish his cell richly and to make a vacation out of a 
punishment? This happened at San Rafael last week and the of- 
ficials who permitted such a travesty of justice should be sharply 
called to time. Why should an ignorant foreigner be sent to the 
rock-pile for an offense which an educated American may expiate 
by luxurious recreation? Such things bring the law and our insti- 
tutions into ridicule. 



— Now the ambitious are gathering for a raid on the personality 
of the president and those who turn their noses up at courts are 
getting themselves ready for the nearest approach to a court that 
we have. Every blooming Elk in the bay vicinity thinks he has a 
right to see the president. This, however, applies only to the climbers 
and to those who have political ambitions. Society is stony hearted 
and does not turn a hair. We find no displacement at Burlingame 
in view of the presidential visit. In no other country in the world 
is the chasm between politics and society so evident as here. 



— The fight of the News Letter for a one-way street to deal with 
the automobile traffic is deserving of greater attention as the days 
go by. The condition of Market street is now pronounced by ex- 
perts to be the worst in the world, though we would not go as far 
as that as we think that some of the Los Angeles streets are quite 
as bad, if not worse. However, it would seem as if nothing short 
of a terrible disaster would call the attention of the authorities to 
the obvious. 



July 28, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



The Naval Situation on the Coast 

BY HARVEY M. TOY Chairman, Bay Cities Naval Affairs Committee 





THE Bay Cities Naval Affairs Committee regards the approach- 
ing visit of the House of Representatives to San Francisco Bay 
as the most important legislative action relating to national defense 
now being contemplated. The United States is seeking to adjust 
its naval activities to meet the requirements of the international 
agreement which has authorized the creation of the 5-5-3 program 
which means that Great Britain and the United States shall each 
maintain about 550,000 tons of capital ships with Japan having 
three-fifths of that sum and France and Italy other defined tonnage. 
The United States fleet is comprised of 18 capital ships averaging 
in the neighborhood of 30,000 tons each, or about 540,000, and it 
is the plan of the Government to assign 14 of those capital ships 
to duty in the Pacific. With vessels or subordinate tonnage of va- 
rious types and character, the United States Fleet in the Pacific 
will comprise something like 225 units, — the largest fleet in the 
world under one command at the present time. 

In order to maintain this mighty armada in an efficient condition, 
it is imperative that suitable shore supports be available, such as 
naval bases of different types or navyyards, docking plants, supply 
houses and the like. Because of the fact that heretofore major mili- 
tary operations of the world have been conducted in the Atlantic, 
as far as their naval elements were concerned, there have been built 
up on the Atlantic seaboard a large number of navy yards and 
bases all the way from Eastport, Maine, to New Orleans, Louisiana, 
which are equipped to care for such fleets as have been in ex- 
istence in the past, but with the rapid development of the capital 
ship even these yards are becoming obsolete, while on the Pacific 
Coast there is no place where the Pacific Fleet can base at present 
and be completely repaired, maintained and equipped. 

It is true there is a navy yard at Mare Island, and a dry dock 
in Puget Sound, but the Mare Island plant is inaccessible to capi- 
tal ships, and Puget Sound is on the flank, adjacent to a foreign 
country and remote from any possible naval activity on the Pacific. 
So while there are a number of places on the Atlantic which could 
be made available for the fleet if it was stationed there, the Pacific 
Coast is entirely without suitable harbor. 

Secretary Denby realized this situation soon after taking office 
and in order to obtain up-to-date and reliable information on the 
subject, appointed a naval board to make a survey of the shore 
establishments of the Navy, and report thereon. The board was 
headed by Admiral Rodman and spent several months in making 
a careful examination of the question. A report was made recently 
in which the various localities were dealt with and various recom- 
mendations made as to abandonment or enlargement, as the cir- 
cumstances seemed to warrant, in the opinion of the board. 

The outstanding and most impressive recommendation in the 
report, however, was that which relates to San Francisco Bay. Tins 
was designated as the major project to be taken up and given pri- 
ority over all continental improvements. The report points out that 
the Pacific Fleet needs San Francisco Bay as its principal base, and 
urges that work on the construction of the Alameda unit of that 
base be commenced at once. It should be here borne in mind that 
San Francisco Bay has been designated by the Secretary of the 
Navy as an operating base, and that a naval base is comprised of 
numerous units so that the construction of a docking, repair and 
supply base at Alameda, does not indicate cessation of nece- 
base activities at other points on the Bay. The Alameda unit ot 



the base is chiefly necessary for the 14 capital ships above referred 
to, but the Mare Island plant will be continued as at present, in 
fact, according to Admiral McKean, its scope will be enlarged as 
soon as the Alameda base gets in full swing. 

The reason, it is asserted, that the visit of the Naval Committee 
means so much at this time, is that that body is making an official 
inspection in order to satisfy itself as to the necessity for the rec- 
ommendations of Admiral Rodman. The Secretary of the Navy 
sent the report to Congress in the latter part of the last session, but 
the time was too short for the committee to give it the attention it 
merited and besides, the new Congress will have a different com- 
mittee, so the report was laid aside for the new session. Now the 
visiting committee will be comprised of most of those who are likely 
to be on the committee during the next session, and their study of 
the question will be of substantial value, when the various projects 
are taken up of legislative consideration. 

The Bay Cities Naval Affairs Committee is squarely behind the 
Rodman report in so far as it relates to San Francisco Bay, and con- 
templates placing at the disposal of the visiting committee all pos- 
sible facilities for its information. The Committee is interested in no 
locality except as it is recommended for use by the responsible 
officers of the Navy, but having complete confidence in those of- 
ficials, it expects to use every legitimate method to the end that 
San Francisco Bay shall be completely equipped as the Main Naval 
Base of the United States on the Pacific, and the center of the mili- 
tary power of the United States for the same area, of the World. 



TAX HEARINGS WON 

Through the tireless efforts of Senator Samuel Shortridge, resi- 
dents of San Francisco and Northern California will not have to 
make special trips to Washington to present their income tax evi- 
dence. Instead, the Mountain will have to come to Mahomet, in 
the shape of a sub-committee on appeals, to conduct hearings in 
San Francisco, during the entire month of September, similar to 
the ones the committee is now hearing in our Southern city. 

It seems that the committee, through misinformation (only a Los 
Angeles real estate man could be guilty of such a whopper!) had 
an idea that their members wouldn't be able to find bed and board 
in our little village and so decided to make their headquarters in 
the City of Angels, and there hold hearings for the entire state. 

But these bold, bad prevaricators of the South reckoned without 
our redoubtable Samuel, who came to our rescue, and managed to 
impress on the mind of the commissioner of Internal Revenue that 
San Francisco, crowded as it has been with conventions, and still 
is, had a few rooms in the Federal building wherein to house the 
several members of the committee. 



A MASTER HAND TOOL 

In the Eifel-Flash Plie Rench, distributed by the Flash Sales 
Corporation, Chicago, and on sale locally by the Eifel-Flash Plierench 
Kit, at 244 Balboa Bldg.. the worker has a hand tool with the great- 
est gripping power ever devised. Its patent power-gear transmis- 
sion gives you the gripping power of ten men; this power-gear di- 
rectly multiplies by ten the gripping strength of the user's hand; 
this means that a man or woman of average strength can apply 
on the work between the Plie Rench jaws, a direct pressure-grip 
of a half ton! 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




KEEN 

Weep him dead and mourn as you may, 

Me, I sing as I must: 
Blessed be death, that cuts in marble 

What would have sunk to dust! 

Blessed be death, that took my love 

And buried him in the sea, 
Where never a lie nor a bitter word 

Will out of his mouth at me! 

This I have to hold to my heart, 

This to take by the hand: 
Sweet we were for a summer month 
As the sun on the dry, white sand; 

Mild we were for a summer month 

As the wind from over the weirs; 
And blessed be death, that hushed with salt 

The harsh and slovenly years! 

Who builds her a house with love for timber, 

Builds her a house of foam; 
And I'd rather be bride to a lad gone down 

Than widow to one safe home. 

— Edna St. Vincent Millay. 
"Century." 



SHE GRIEVES IN THE DUSK 

Ah, he was white and slender 
And the lamplight turned him gold 
And his groping hands were tender 
And his kisses never bold. 
How shall I sleep through the long, long nights 

In my wide cold-sheeted bed. 
Hearing the wild geese crying in their flights, 

And me afraid, 
And him not by to turn and hold me to his heart 
In the way he knew. 
And me no longer folded to his heart 
Thinking him true. 

— William Alexander Percy 



SEA FOG 

The world's a ten-rod circle; hills are gone. 
Unless this floor of scrub and meadow-sweet 
Slanting to hidden nothing, on and on. 
May be a hill — I guess it by my feet ! 

The fir-tree dares not shake or even sigh. 
For fear of spilling beauty, bright as brief; 
The silvered cobwebs scare away the fly. 
And quicksilver slides down the mullein leaf. 

Oh, fog-drops strung on birch like beads on hair! 
On each red barberry there hangs a tear. 
What wonder I forget the outer air. 
Shut in with a little beauty plain and near? 

— Abbie Huston Evans. 



UP FROM THE DRY ARROYO 

Up from the dry arroyo comes a song. 

Cool, liquid, calling up a welcome rush 

Of sweet, green-vistaed woodland memories. 

Can it be? In this desert place a thrush! 

Oh, he will sing to life the vanished stream 

That over these dried boulders used to flow! 

Awaken all the happy water-things 

That darted, glinting, through the pools below; 

And with the magic of the winter rain, 

Will flute the desert flowers back again! 

— Frances Macfarland Bock. 
"American Poetry." 



SONNET 



I know I am but summer to your heart. 
And not the full four seasons of the year; 
And you must welcome from another part 
Such noble moods as are not mine, my dear. 
No gracious weight of golden fruits to sell 
Have I, nor any wise and wintry thing; 
And I have loved you all too long and well 
To carry still the high sweet breast of spring. 
Wherefore I say: love, as summer goes, 
I must be gone, steal forth with silent drums. 
That you may hail anew the bird and rose 
When I come back to you as summer comes, 
Else will you seek, at some not distant time. 
Even your summer in another clime. 

—Edna St. Vincent Millay. 



BABCOCK'S 



RED 
BOOK 

of 

RULES 



/< 



or 






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(2nd Edition) 

TIip only recognized authority on Mali Jongg. 
Price $2.50 wherever Mah Jongg is sold, or direct 
from us if your dealer cannot supply you. 

Cloth Bound Lithographed Cover. Its 117 pages are 
profusely illustrated and contain what you want to know. 

Mah Jongg Sales Company of America 

1270 Broadway, New York — 30 S. State St., Chicago 
36 Spear St., San Francisco 



July 28. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




HE&RPIT? 



— A callow youth with an incipient moustache, which he fingered 
caressingly, sat in the Pullman car. An old man kept staring- whimsi- 
cally at the youth, until the latter lost patience and asked with hau- 
teur, "Do I remind you of anyone you know?" "Faith an' you do," 
was the reply; "you remind me of an ould aunt of mine in Cork, 
only she had a damn sight better moustache than you have." 

— A real estate agent was showing a possible tenant over a house. 
The damp was running down the walls in streamlets and all the 
fixtures were green with mould. The would-be tenant looked round 
him doubtfully. "It's a bit damp, isn't it?" he said. "Damp?" 
echoed the agent triumphantly. "Of course it's damp. Just think 
what an advantage that would be in case of fire." 

— A Scottish minister while taking his early morning walk found 
one of his parishioners recumbent in a ditch. "Whaur hae ye been 
the nicht, Andrew?" he inquired. "Well, I dinna richtly ken," said 
the prostrate one, "whether it was a wedding or a funeral, but which- 
ever it was it was a most extraordinary success." 



— An amusing story is told regarding two men, one of whom was 
desirous of selling the other an automobile. After describing all its 
faults and its many virtues, he said he was willing to let his friend 
have it for $2500. "Oh," said the other, "I have a surprise for 
you, but I hardly like to give it to you verbally; I think I must 
write you on the matter." His friend replied, "Come along, let's 
have it now. What is it?" "Well," was the answer, "I will offer 
you $250 for the car." "I have a surprise for you also," came the 
retort; "I'll take it." 

— A well-known 'varsity don, who was extremely absent-minded, 
once went to spend an evening at a friend's house. When he was 
about to leave it was raining so heavily that his hostess offered to 
give him a bed for the night, which offer he readily accepted. Sud- 
denly the professor disappeared, nobody knowing what had be- 
come of him, and just as the family were about to retire for the 
night, in walked the professor, drenched to the skin. He had been 
home to fetch his pyjamas. 

— An exceptionally voluble golfer was vainly endeavoring to move 
a ball with his driver. Pausing in his efforts, he esp'^d, watching him, 
a small girl holding by the hand a still smaller boy. Immediately 
visions of the dangers of flying golf balls flashed across his mind. 
"You ought not to bring your little brother here," he cautioned the 
girl. "Oh," it's all right, sir," came the reply; "he's stone deaf." 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

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Hotel 

Remodeled- Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 
NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Hates, American 
plan. $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See lVck .imlnh or Crabtreea 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



Grand 

Canyon 

Line 



,' - 



until September 15 
Good for return 

October 31 
Liberal Stopoverj 

S ample round trip 

Fares 

Chicago * 8622 
Kansas City 22« 
Denver 64«2 
Houston 72s 
New York. 147iS 
Minneapolis 8752 
St. Louis 8152 
Omaha 7222 
New Orleans 85 £ 
Boston 15352 

and many others 

R, n. Johnson, Dir. Pass. 

Act.. 501 Market St. Ph. 

Sutter TfiOO; or Market 

St. Ferry. Ph. Sutter 7600 

San Francisco 

ickeast 

excursions 



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Blairsden, Plumas County 
California's Ideal ^Mountain l^esort 



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The Golf course opened in 1921, is 
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lake and stream trout fishing in 
the State. Horseback riding. Hik- 
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Excellent motor roads from all 
directions. 

For rates and reservations and il- 
lustrative folder, address 
W. W. BROWN 
Feather River Inn 
Blairsden, Cal. 



Qood Bala Reasonable Prices 

A la Carte Service at All Hours 

Special Attention to Week-end 

Parties 

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MODERN 

— Under New Management — 
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Between Woodaide and I. a Honda 
From Redwood C: 
Door 
Phone Redwood 1711 F 1-2 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




BUSY CUPID 

CUNNINGHAM-RAPPLEYE — The marriage of Miss Elizabeth 
Cunningham, youngest daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
James Cunningham of San Francisco, and Dr. Willard Rap- 
pleye of New Haven, Conn., was solemnized Friday, July 2 0. 
in New Haven, according to word received by relatives and 
friends in California. The ceremony was held at the home 
of the bride's brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Murray 
Sargent, and was a very quiet affair, as the bride's family 
is in mourning for their mother. Dr. and Mrs. Rappleye 
are planning to come West on their honeymoon and they 
will visit for some days in San Francisco, where they will be 
much entertained. 

TURNER-MACKENZIE — An engagement is being announced in 
the betrothal of Miss Ruth Bell Turner, daughter of Mrs. 
George Webster Turner and of the late Mr. Turner, to Charles 
Ewing Mackenzie, son of Mrs. John Ross Mackenzie. With 
her mother, Miss Turner has lived in Los Gatos in the past 
few years. She passes much of her time with her sister, 
Mrs. Hans Lisser, and Dr. Lisser at their home. Young Mac- 
kenzie is a graduate of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y., and 
of Ohio State University. During the war he served overseas 
with the Twenty-third Engineering Corps. No immediate date 
is set for the wedding. 

LUNCHEONS 

WELCH — In honor of her mother, Mrs. William F. Fullam, Mrs. 
Raymond Welch entertained at a luncheon last Friday at 
her home in Burlingame. The guests bidden to meet the 
visitor included Mrs. Joseph O. Tobin, Mrs. Rennie P. 
Schwerin, Mrs. George Barr Baker, Mrs. Frederick Sharon, 
Mrs. Phillip Van Home Lansdale, Mrs. William H. Crocker, 
Mrs. George P. Howard, Mrs. George T. Marye, Mrs. Dixwell 
Hewitt and Mrs. Joseph D. Grant. 

JACKLING — Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Cowan Jackling entertained 
at a picnic, Sunday afternoon, in the woods back of their 
country seat at Woodside. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander H. Ruth- 
erford, who spent the week-end with them, were among their 
guests. 

DINNERS 

WALES — Major and Mrs. Philip Gray Wales entertained on Sat- 
urday evening at their home in Menlo Park at a dinner 
party. 

MILLER — Mr. and Mrs. C. O. G. Miller entertained a group of 
subdebutantes and their escorts at dinner Tuesday evening 
at their home in Pacific avenue. 

McNEAR — Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch, the latter of whom has 
just returned from abroad, and their daughters, Miss Flor- 
ence and Miss Marie Welch, were the guests of honor at an 
informal supper at which Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear 
entertained Sunday evening. The party was held at the Mc- 
Near home in Menlo Park. 

BOY'D — Miss Louise A. Boyd was hostess at an informal dinner 
party to a dozen of her friends from San Rafael recently 
at her home in San Rafael. 

DANCES 

SPRECKELS — Miss Eleanor Spreckels gave a dancing party at 
the Rudolph Spreckels home in Burlingame last Saturday 
evening in honor of Mrs. Moseley Taylor of Boston. It was 
a large affair and included besides the members of the debut- 
ante set, the younger married couples who were the asso- 
ciates of Mrs. Taylor when she was Miss Emily Pope of this 
city. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

FORD — Mr. and Mrs. Sherman Ford have arrived from the East 
on a visit to their relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lapham, in 
their Menlo Park home. 

DEERING — Miss Francesca Deering is spending a fortnight in 
the Santa Cruz mountains as the guest of Miss Mary Bernice 
Moore. 

DUTTON — Mr. and Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton have gone to the 
Webber Lake country for a few weeks' stay and are spending 
much time fishing. Mrs. Dutton returned from New York 
last month after a three months' absence. 



McENERNY — Attorney Garret W. McEnerney and Mrs. McEn- 
erney left San Francisco Monday for Europe, where he will 
spend a number of months in resting, after arduous labors 
in the unmerger case of the Southern Pacific and Central 
Pacific railroads, which has just been submitted to the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission. The McEnerneys will visit nu- 
merous European points of interest and plan to return home 
about August 31. 

CHESEBROUGH — Mrs. Arthur S. Chesebrough and her child- 
ren are the house guests of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
liam Mayo Newhall, at their home in Scott street. Mrs. 
Chesebrough arrived a few days ago from her home at New- 
hall, near Los Angeles, and will remain here until the end of 
the summer. While here she will visit her brother-in-law and 
sister, Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean, at Woodside, where they 
are spending the summer in the John Lawson house. 

MOFFITT — Dr. and Mrs. Herbert MofBtt and their daughter, 
Miss Alice MofBtt, returned from the East and Europe Wed- 
nesday. They have been away four months and have trav- 
eled extensively. 

McNEAR — Mr. and Mrs. John McNear gave a house party over 
the week-end at Brackenwood, their country place on the 
Russian River. 

SPRAGUE — Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sprague spent the week-end 
as the guests of their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Henry Poole, at Menlo Park. 

BILLINGS — Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius K. G. Billings and party 
of friends arrived from Santa Barbara Monday in their pri- 
vate car and are stopping at tne Hotel Fairmont. The Bil- 
lings came West from Chicago with a party of Eastern friends 
lasi week and have been at their estate in Montecito. 

KIERSTED — Maj. Henry Kiersted has returned to his Burlingame 
home from Santa Barbara, where he visited Captain Samuel 
Purviance, U. S. A., retired. Mrs. Kiersted is expected from 
the East next month. She went with her mother, Mrs. Peter 
McG. McBean. 

Y'OUNGER — Miss Maud Younger, who came from her home in 
Washington a few weeks ago for the wedding of her niece, 
Miss Virginia Nugent, and Mr. Ashfield Stow, is now in Car- 
mel with her sister, Baroness Nugent, who has taken a cot- 
tage there for the summer. 

BISHOP — Mrs. James Hall Bishop and her daughter, Miss Isa- 
belle Bishop, who will be one of next season's debutantes, 
took their departure Tuesday for the south, where they will 
spend the remainder of this month and the month of August 
at the Bishop ranch in the Goleta valley. 

LAW — Mr. and Mrs. Harold Law and the latter's sister, Mrs. 
Elyse Schultz Hopkins, who passed the week-end at Monte- 
rey as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Haldron, have re- 
cently returned from a motor trip to the southern part of the 
state. While in the south they visited in Los Angeles, stop- 
ping over in Santa Barbara on their way north. The Laws 
ami Mrs. Hopkins will leave this week for Tahoe, where they 
will spend the remainder of the summer. 

LA MONTAGNE — Mr. and Mrs. Clinton La Montagne, who with 
their children have been at Lake Tahoe. returned Monday. 
Tuesday the La Montagnes took possession of their new home 
at Menlo Park. It is a picturesque house of pure Spanish 
type. 

HENDRICKSON — Mr. and Mrs. Will Hendrickson Jr. have gone 
to Lake Tahoe, where they are enjoying a visit at the country 
home of Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Schmieden. 

CROCKER — Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker and Miss Helen 
Crocker are in Santa Barbara. They have recently been in 
Los Angeles and in Pasadena. In the southern city they are 
guests at El Mirasol. 

TOWNE — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. Towne have gone to Glen- 
brook for a several weeks' stay. They will return to their 
home in this city about August 5. 

THOMPSON — Mr. and Mrs. Clarke Thompson, who have been 
abroad for more than a year, returned to California last 
week. They passed several days in this city, dividing their 
sojourn between the homes of Mr. and Mrs. James Tattersall 
and Mr. and Mrs. James Schlesinger. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

65 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



July 28. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



CLAY — Mrs. Philip Clay and her daughter, Miss Mariedna Clay, 
are occupying their country place at Lake Tahoe, and it is 
the scene of a gay house party, the personnel being the youth- 
ful friends of the daughter, Miss Clay. Miss Edna Sherman, 
daughter of Mrs. Frederick Sherman, who, with her son, is 
passing the summer at Del Mar, is a guest. Miss Isabell Creed, 
daughter of the Wiggington Creeds, completes a happy trio. 

DRAYTON — Mrs. E. L. Drayton of Piedmont has been spending 
some time at Pebble Beach, planning her new home in the 
hills overlooking Carmel bay. The plans have been prepared 
by Miss Julia Morgan. 

PIXLEY — Mrs. Frank Pixley is here from the south at Hotel St. 
Francis. She is meeting her friends here prior to her de- 
parture for an indefinite stay abroad. She plans to leave 
within a fortnight, joining friends in Vancouver, with whom 
she will go to Europe. 

BONYNGE — Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Bonynge of Los Angeles, promi- 
nent in affairs in the south, are in town for a time while com- 
pleting their plans for going abroad. They will sail from 
New York before long. 

INTIMATIONS 

STENT — Mr. Ernest Stent Jr. and Mr. Frederick Cahill are 
being congratulated on having won the silver cups, which 
were awards in the tennis tournament played over the week- 
end in Menlo Park. The contest was held Saturday and Sun- 
day afternoons on the courts of the Menlo Country Club. It 
was for men only and the entrants included some of the 
proudest names on the social register. In the final match 
the winners played against Mr. Charles R. McCormick Jr. 
and Mr. Sherwood Chapman. 

GERSTLE — Mrs. Mark Gerstle and Miss Louise Gerstle, who 
arrived recently in New York after a three months' European 
visit, spent a week in Main and left for home Tuesday. 

BANNING — Congratulations are being sent to Mr. and Mrs. 
George Hugh Banning, who are the parents of a son, at 
their home in Thousand Oaks, Berkeley. Mrs. Banning was 
formerly Miss Gladys Armstrong of Los Angeles, and Mr. 
Banning is a member of the well-known Banning family of 
the South. 

BRYAN — Captain and Mrs. Loftus Bryan have left England for 
Ireland, where he has an estate. They will spend the re- 
mainder of the summer there. Mrs. Bryan was Miss Sophie 
Beylard of San Mateo. She was recently entertained in Lon- 
don by some of Captain Loftus Bryan's relatives and friends, 
and also by Mrs. John B. Casserly and Miss Cecily Casserly, 
who are in London for several months. 

HURN — Mrs. Philip Hum of Pasadena, who was Miss Florence 
Russell of San Francisco, is planning a visit to Miss Frances 
Pringle and her mother. Mrs. Edward Prtngle, at Miramar, 
where they have a cottage for the summer. Mrs. Hum will 
soon enter moving pictures again, after an absence from the 
studios of a year. She. will have a part in "Black Oxen," by 
her grandmother, Mrs. Gertrude Atherton, which is being 
made into a scenario for pictures. 

FOSTER — A number of the summer residents on the Russian 
river will, as usual, keep open house during the Bohemian 
Club jinks. Among those who have opened their homes and 
are entertaining miosis there are Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Foster 
and their daughter, Miss Louisiana Foster. They are enter- 
taining this week Mrs. George Boyd and Miss Cynthia Boyd. 
and Miss Margaret Mee was their guest over last week-end. 
Others who are keeping open house are Mr. and Mrs. Edgar 
Peixotto, Mr. and Mrs. John McNear and Mr. anil Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Upham. 

JACKMAN— Mr. and Mrs. .lames .lackman (Anne Peters), fol- 
lowing their wedding, motored to Pebble Beach, where they 
passed several days. They are now at Santa Barbara. On 
their return from their honeymoon there is a possibility that 
Mr. and Mrs. .lackman will take a house down the peninsula 
tor the remainder of the summer and come to town for the 
winter. 

HAMMERSMITH — Miss Helen Hammersmith left last Monday 
for the Kast and Europe, to remain abroad for about six 
months. She will join Mrs George Barnett, wife of General 
Bamett of the Marine Corps, in the Kast. who will accompany 
her abroad. 

ROGERS— Dr. John Rogers of New York, accompanied by his 
nephew. Mr. Roger Kent of Kcntfield. is en enroute to Eu- 
rope. They reached Paris last week and joined Mr. and Mrs. 
William Kent, where they and Miss Adaline Kent have 
during the month of July. 

O'SULLIVAN— Miss Biddy OSullivan. daughter of the late Dennis 
O'Sulllvan, who has been in London for the past three years, 
has returned to the United States. 




By AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 

CECIL DeMILLE, one of the greatest directors of the silver 
screen, and a company of over forty people arrived in San 
Francisco on Sunday, and will work here for four or five 
days on part of the filming of "The Ten Commandments," which 
is the largest of all the big pictures to be made this year by 
the Famous Players-Lasky organization. The sequences to be 
made here are part of the seventh commandment, and lists of the 
stars playing in it include such well known names as Leatrice 
Joy, Nita Naldi, Richard Dix, Robert Edeson, James Neill, Rod 
La Rocque, James McPherson, and many others. Chester Gore, 
and E. E. Davis came to town the early part of last week to 
find locations, and make other arrangements for the work of the 
outfit. 



H. A. Snow, of "Hunting Big Game in Africa" fame, his son 
Sidney Snow, and their wives, left last Friday on the S. S. Bu- 
ford for an Arctic cruise to Alaska and Siberia, to be gone about 
forty days. They will make pictures of the entire trip, and also 
expect to bring back polar bears, and sealions for Mr. Snow's 
collection at his Oakland Zoo, where he already has many ani- 
mals. The party has recently returned from Tuolumne County, 
where they were making pictures of hunting lions in California. 
J. C. Bruce, state lion hunter, was with them, and they had a 
most successful trip and many thrilling experiences, as one big 
lion (or cougar) nearly got Sid Snow, and was at last shot down 
so close to him that both he and the camera were spattered 
with blood. The whole family expect to leave in the early fall 
for another picture making trip to the interior of Africa. 

Here is a new idea for the big directors: An extra man from 
the South, pretending to be a director, masquerading as Crane 
Wilbur, and claiming to be casting for Metro, arrived in San 
Francisco a couple of weeks ago, and caused many a flutter in 
the hearts of the local would-be screen stars by trying out a lot 
of girls for what be claimed was going to be a big production. 
As a real proof that he was all he pretended to be, he pointed 
out the tail that he wore a large Gold Star on one sleeve, which 
he said was the badge worn by all good directors. Some idea? 
but wo are sure quite new to Cecil DeMille, Eric Von Stroheim, 
Fred Xiblo and a few more of that class. A telegram to the 
Meti-o Studio, and a few well directed questions soon showed 
him up as the rank imposter that he really was. and we hope 
that the town is now well rid of him. 

* * * 

The days of work on Eric Von Stt'oheim's production of "Greed" 
still to ho completed in San Francisco grow less and less, and 
they new think that another ton days will see them done here 
and on their way. Little Hughie Mack, all the three hundred 
and sixty-eight pounds of him. has finished his part in the pic- 
ture, anil left for his home in Los Angeles last Thursday. Dale 
Fuller is also thru, and departed for the South on Tuesday. All 
of the company seem to leave San Francisco with real regret, 
for they have been here so long that they say they feel like old 
residents. 

* * * 

Max Graf, head of the Graf Productions of this city, and his 
brother, Louis Graf, president of the organization, have both 
gone to Los Angeles within the past two or three days to com- 
plete their cast, and make arrangements for the production of 
their next picture. It will be from a sea story by Curtis Benton. 
that is to appear shortly in the Saturday Evening Post, called 
"Half-A-Dollar Bill." and the studio work will be done at the 
Pacific Studios at San Mateo, with the sea stuff shot on a ship 
well out to sea off this port. 

* * * 

The West Coast Productions of Los Angeles have opened a 
branch office here with headquarters in the Phelan Building. 
and expect to make a picture at the Pacific Studios at San Mateo 
in the near future. As announced, it will be called "Nobody's 
Child." The story was written by .lames Galnay. who will also 
direct its making, and the cast will include such well known 
names as Lew- Cody. Rosemary Theby. Niles Welsh. Don 
and others. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money — V. 

ARGENTINA today is one of the greatest 
and most advanced countries in indus- 
try and art and its natural developed and un- 
developed resources are so vast it is almost 
impossible to compute the possibilities con- 
tained therein. But Argentina had to go 
through the spasm of cheap money insanity, 
just as that which Germany and Russia are 
today experiencing. 

It is useless to state the why and the where- 
for, but cheap money did come to Argentina 
and not only did the people of that country 
go wild over it but the insanity extended to 
England and there one of the biggest banks 
in the world went to the wall, on account of 
the ensuing depression when the hectic print- 
ing of money ceased and the cheap money 
became cheap indeed, so cheap it was that 
you could buy nothing at all with it. 



A Rich and Buoyant People 

The Argentinian is naturally of a nature 
that is enterprising to a degree. And when 
the cheap money propaganda started he was 
found taking to it like a duck takes to water. 
This was about 1889 and the flooding of the 
country with cheap money continued until 
about 1892. Buenos Aires, in 1873, could 
boast of the establishment of a Mortgage 
Bank. The main object of this bank was the 
loaning of money on all kinds of landed 
property. Any person owning land could go 
to this bank and borrow to one-half of its 
value. This value was fixed by the bank's ap- 
praisers. The bank gave him a mortgage 
bond, or cedula, which was to run for 
twenty-four years, at from 6 to 8 per cent 
interest, 2 per cent amortization, and 1 per 
cent commission. The interest was payable 
quarterly, and coupons were attached for 
twenty-four years. 

These cedulas were issued in alphabetical 
order, beginning with A and running to P. 
They were handled on the Stock Exchange 
and from the moment of issue they became 
an important element in speculation. 



The First Issue 

This was for $14,000,000, the Argentine 
dollar being about 96 cents of our money. 
The cedulas remained at par for only a short 
time after issue. Series A closed with a total 
issue of $27,500,000. 



per cent. Then came series E, with a total 
issue of $15,830,000, at 6 per cent; F, with 
a total issue of $6,100,000, at 7 per cent. 
Ten years after the establishment of the bank 
over $100,000,000 of these cedulas had 
been issued and be it remembered all based 
upon the landed property of a single prov- 
ince! 

All the cedulas had been used for specula- 
tion and this speculation became wildly reck- 
less. A ring was formed between the bankers 
and certain brokers, for the absolute control 
of successive issues. No one could obtain 
concessions for a loan who did not apply 
through these brokers. In order that all 
might reap a reward from this particular 
kind of financial science the value of the 
property was raised to the most extravagant 
figures. 



A Fictitious Prosperity 

In order that the fictitious prosperity en- 
joyed by the Hypothecary Bank might spread 
to all parts of the country, in 1884, Con- 
gress passed a law annexing a hypothecary 
bank to the National Bank. The issue of 
cedulas was at first limited to $40,000,000 
but by November, 1890, this bank had out 
over $240,000,000 and the Buenos Aires 
Bank had so increased its issues that it had 
out $330,000,000. In seventeen years there 
had been loaned on land in the Argentine 
Republic over $534,000,000, or $140 for 
every man, woman and child. When the Na- 
tional Bank went into the hypothecary busi- 
ness, in 1884, the value of the paper money 
was at par with gold. In 1885 gold rose to 
20 per cent. In the month of February of 
that year it had reached 33 per cent. At one 
time it stood 330 per cent. 



The Flood 

Issue B was for $1,920,000; series C, with 
$813,000! series D, with $288,000; all at 7 



And Now the State Banks 

In 1884 State banks were started. These 
issued paper money but this money was not 
redeemable with gold. When gold had risen 
to 40 per cent the government took the posi- 
tion that this was a trick of the brokers. In 
order to circumvent this alleged trickery some 
bright particular genius had the idea of hav- 
ing a law passed allowing the banks to issue 
currency without a limit as to quantity. At 
the same time, the government threw $30,- 
000,000 of its reserve gold on the market. 
But there was no perceptible check to the 
rise in the percentage for gold. The banks 
threw out one edition of paper money after 
the other in order to check the frenzied up- 
ward flight of gold. 



What Is the Use? 

Argentina had its deplorable experience 
and it has taken years to obliterate the ter- 
rible results of the attempt to establish a 
cheap money paradise in that wonderful 
country. This issue of paper reached the 
sum of $100 per capita for every man, 
woman and child in the republic. That cer- 
tainly ought to have put plenty of money 
in the pockets of the people. 

When the National Bank went into the 
hypothecary business the whole country en- 
tered into one wild debauch of speculation, 
and this closely resembled, in essential re- 
spects, the scenes enacted in France in the 
days of John Law. Argentina had its lesson 
and it took a long time for it to recover from 
so terrific a blow. Of course, my readers 
must not blame me but the lack of space pre- 
cluding giving more features of this fearful 
output of cheap money. Next week I will 
give another chapter on the same subject. 



Germany and Russia 

It is not so very long ago the Germans 
were held up to the world as examples of 
wisdom in the science of government. It is to 
be supposed that there really was some basis 
upon which the admirers of Germans and 
German methods could securely base such a 
conclusion. Certainly, since the beginning of 
the days of the so-called "Republic of Ger- 
many" very little has transpired in the way 
of government that will fortify people in sup- 
posing the Germans are possessed of any- 
thing like the brains of supermen. Nothing 
can reconcile us to the system of finance, in 
Germany today, except that it is a nation of 
idiots or a nation of rogues, with the scale 
inclining toward imbecility as the great actu- 
ating principle. Last week the printing presses 
of the government were worked day and 
night at full capacity turning out marks for 
the dear people. On the other hand, Russia 
is doing the same thing and it is a race be- 
tween these two nations as to which one may 
turn out the most of the worthless money in a 
given time. Here, again, is cheap money in 
abundance and every Hans and Gretchen in 
Germany should have a barn full of the 
pretty printed government obligations. 



Up Go the Stocks and Bonds 

As I predicted the low tendencies in stocks, 
due to the failures of curb and other bro- 
kers in New York recently, was of but short 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 But.li Street 

Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 



July 28, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



I) 



duration and already we see that such things 
are very easily forgotten. This week, and last, 
show an upward tendency and this will con- 
tinue with the usual fluctuations from now 
on. 



Filipino Row 

Governor-General Leonard Wood has met 
with a very strong opposition in the Legisla- 
ture of the Philippine Islands. Manuel Que- 
zon, who has been a sort of native czar, has 
aligned with him in opposition to the Gov- 
ernor about every official of the Island gov- 
ernment. This row has been seething for a 
long time and has shown on the surface in 
various ways. Outside of the Legislature and 
the ranks of officialdom Quezon has not had 
things his own way and there is a variety of 
opinion among the natives. Everyone recog- 
nizes the efficiency of the Wood administra- 
tion and everyone, except the politicians, 
knows that native administration means all 
kinds of inefficiency and graft. Many of the 
natives recognize this as a fact. However, the 
action of the Filipino officials will bring 
about a very thorough investigation and, as 
the result of the probe, we will know if Gen- 
eral Wood is right or if the protesters are 
right. We do know, without an investiga- 
tion, that the natives have been given too 
much power and have not known how to use 
it to the benefit of all concerned. 



The End of the Ruhr Occupation 

This is supposed to be near at hand and 
the stories in the papers would lead anyone 
to believe that the French and the Belgians 
might move out of the occupied territory to- 
morrow. But a long time will pass by before 
that marching back to France will occur and 
Germany has a pilgrimage of humiliation to 
make on the road to the adoption of a policy 
of common honesty, which will be long and 
hard, too. 



Insurance Matters 

San Francisco has had the honor of en- 
tertaining two hundred members of the Quar- 
ter Million Dollar Club of the Missouri State 
Life Insurance Company. And these men 
were entertained as only San Francisco 
"knows how." 



The Ticket Scalpers 

The Chamber of Commerce and members 
of other organizations have taken the initia- 
tive in the movement to remove the ticket 
scalper from San Francisco. This has been 
attempted before but without much success. 



Tax Review Men 

That genial gentleman. Julius rCahn. mem- 
ber of Congress and all around good fellow. 
has arranged for the entertainment here next 
September of the sub-committee on appeal 
and reviews to hear claimants. Permission as 
to making San Francisco the headquarters 
has not yet been obtained but it is expected, 
as it is really only a matter of form. 



Banks and Bankers 

The bankers are happy and the banks are 
overflowing with money. There never has 
been such heavy depositing going on in San 
Francisco or in California in the history of 
the city or the state. 



Building Activities 

While building has to some extent stopped 
in the Eastern States on account of the high 
price of materials as well as the increasing 
price of labor there has not been any stop- 
page here. Everything is going at full blast. 
It is the result of the American Plan being 
successfully applied. 



Boyes Hot Springs 

45 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. W. P. R . R. 

Beautiful New Golf Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths, Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools, Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. LICHTENBERG, Boyes Springs, 

Or Peck-Judah, 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



An Exclusive Radio Store 

Authorized Dealers for All Standard 
Radio Equipment 

Service, Help on Construction, 
Diagrams 

Manufacturing Repairing Installation 

We are as Close to You As Your 
Phone 

MILLER-TAYLOR RADIO CO. 

C. E. MILLER H. M. TAYLOR 

1403 Bush St. San Francisco, Calif. 

i at Polk I Phone Prospect 6575 



TYPEWRITERS 

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All Makes j*™'™ 

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The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 

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i r>06 Market St., San Fran. Phone Pour. 649 
308 12th St., Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 6 4 San Francisco 



The Rates Are 
Reasonable 

at this 

Delightful 
Hotel 

DAILY 

One person, room with 

bath $3.50 

Two persons, room with 

bath $5.00 

One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY RATES 

One person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $2t'.00 

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days to the month. 

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Agua Caliente Springs 

The Fireproof Hotel in 
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Private baths. Swimming pool, filled 
daily with hot sulphur water. No chem- 
icals used in this water. Golf course 
close to hotel. My motto — service, 
cleanliness and the best of table. It 
you want health and rest this is the 
place. Make reservation early. Address 
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Sonoma Co. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. 



to 9 p. m. 



GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

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65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kramj 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Meali Served a la Carte. Alio Regular 
French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 




LEISURE'S WW 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore- 



California 

Once more has the wonder-child, Jackie 
Coogan, demonstrated his unusual gifts as 
an actor talented far beyond his years. The 
little lad is indeed a prodigy and his ability 
to depict emotions, both humorous and pa- 
thetic, is an amazing matter. In the play, 
"Circus Days," now on the California screen, 
Jackie is given over almost entirely to the 
funny side of things and keeps us laughing 
throughout the picture. The role of lemon- 
ade vendor at a . circus is one offering un- 
limited opportunity for comic situations, and 
the little ragged hero loses not one of them. 
Scenes of circus life are frequent enough in 
the films, but in this Toby Tyler tale the 
tent show is portrayed with a new realism 
and its many diverting phases serve to fur- 
nish the popular young actor with a back- 
ground and satisfactory surroundings for his 
appearing personality. 

After the "big show" is over we are treated 
to several "side shows" including a dance 
number, "Pierrot and the Pony," by East- 
er and Hazelton, and "Orpheus" nobly ren- 
dered by the California orchestra. The pic- 
ture of Soviet Russia, named "Red Russia 
Revealed" cannot be casually numbered 
among the "side shows." It is in a class by 
itself, and if this were only a political page 
instead of a dramatic page, you would hear 
a whole lot on the subject of Red Russia. 
Dramatic critics, however, are not supposed 
to know anything but dramatics (and jolly 
little of that) so the patient reader will be 
spared any such digression. 



Columbia's Artistic Triumph 

"If Winter Comes," the screen version of 
Hutchinson's widely read novel, is one of 
the aristocrats of motion pictures, having 
all the fine points and exquisite character- 
istics of gentle breeding that make it shine 
like a lone star in a world full of darkness 
and dull coarse crudities. The well-known 
story with its delicate humor, its poignant 
emotions, its lovely, lovely English back- 
ground and its odd Quixotic hero, was not 
an easy matter to film. Fortunately, thrice 
fortunately, it came to the right hands, and 
the result is an achievement of high merit. 
Percy Marchmont was born to act the part 
of Mark Sabre. Of that there can be no 
doubt. He may never do another piece of 
acting, for he is not so very good looking, 
nor so particularly clever, but to do anything 
as well as he has with this loveable char- 
acter of Sabre is quite sufficient for a life- 
time. His complete understanding of the 
role is beautiful. He is an Englishman. Ann 



Forest is a successful Lady Tabar, high bred, 
handsome, courageous and true to her class. 
The ungrateful part of Mable is excellently 
portrayed, as are Twining, Young Perch and 
the classic maidservants, High and Low Jinks. 
What a pity that young Millarde, whose name 
I noticed among the makers of the picture, 
did not amputate the tableaux opening and 
ending "If Winter Comes." They strike a 
discordant note, and have no place with 
a production of such artistic excellence. 



Granada 

Dorothy Dalton has a new picture, "The 
Law of the Lawless," and a new leading 
man, Charles de Roche. The play is all 
about the Tartars, their manners and cus- 
toms, their country and their cruelty. Some 
of the scenes are strikingly effective and the 
acting of Mr. de Roche is worthy of high 
commendation, for he is goodlooking and 
agile and carries off the somewhat exacting 
role of a Tartar maiden's lover with con- 
siderable skill. Miss Dalton is just about 
the same, thank you, as she always is. There 
is little variety about this handsome actress, 
but she is a satisfactory sort of person, none 
the less. Tully Marshall has a picturesque 
character part, that of a Tartar gentleman 
of questionable business habits, and he han- 
dles it well. 

John Steel, tenor, accompanied by Cad- 
man, composer-pianist, makes a brilliant 
musical interlude in the Granada program. 
The voice of this young American singer is 
growing richer with the years and his art, 
too, is enriched and more broad than when 
he was last heard in San Francisco. To hear 
him sing is a real joy and one is left in such 
a happy mood that even the racket stirred 
up by Paul Ash and his fellow-clowns is 
borne with equanimity. By the way, what 
IS an "atmospheric concert?" That is what 
they call Ash's antics. Accustomed as one 
is to the vagaries of the hard-working Mr. 
Parkington's remarkable vocabulary, this 
gives one a slight start. However, however, — 



Orpheum 

Theodore Roberts appears this week on 
the Orpheum stage in a strong one-act play 
written for him by William De Mille, a tre- 
mendously dramatic and emotional charac- 
terization well suited to the powers of this 
virile actor. The story, told with that brisk 
conciseness necessary to a play of its length, 
is one dealing with mental cruelty, and Rob- 
erts does some fine acting as the vengeful 
Teuton who devotes his life to destroying his 
victim by suggestion and haunting torture. 



An able company supports the star in this 
production, including Wilfrid Lucas. 

Ben Bernie and his band continues to de- 
light Orpheum fans with their varied pro- 
grams and spirited selections. The Four 
Camerons have a riotously funny act for 
their present visit to San Francisco, and are 
warmly received in their laughter-laden of- 
fering. The ingenuity with which they think 
up new nonsense and the irresistable way 
they dispense it, make these comedians the 
prime favorites that they are. Pearl Regay 
is a wonderful dancer, no doubt of that. Her 
partner, Lester Sheehan, has a busy time 
keeping up with her, but he seems to enjoy 
it, and certainly the dance-loving people in 
the audience enjoyed them both and their 
clever performance, along with Finly's ex- 
cellent piano accompaniment. "Doubt" is a 
rather well constructed playlet, with an idea 
in it, and very well acted by Paul Decker, 
who is an accomplished comedian. Chong 
and Rosie Moey, the Chinese song-and-dance 
performers, are always popular here in the 
city where they started their stage career 
several years ago. 



Tivoli 

Things are looking up at the Tivoli. This 
is good news, for the dear old theater is 
one of the traditions of San Francisco and 
it's rather like dressing the Queen in rags 
to have unworthy entertainment within the 
walls that have held the best. Not that Bus- 
ter Keaton's pretentious comedy, "Three 
Ages," is anything phenomenal, but it is a 
first-class production, full of genuine fun and 
excellently acted by Keaton, who is a co- 
median of first rank, Wallace Beery, an ac- 
quisition to any cast, Margaret Leahy, cele- 
brated in England for her beauty, and a 
large company of players. 

The "Three Ages" of the title are sup- 
posed to represent three phases in man's pro- 
gress toward civilization, being character 
portrayals of a caveman, a noble Roman, a 
modern male person of today. Keaton shows 
a surprising dramatic ability in each delinea- 
tion. 



Portola 

"Lying Lips" — sounds vampish and vic- 
ious, doesn't it? The play is plentifully sprin- 
kled with human traits of this kind and the 
other. The plot is not new, but is logically 
carried out, and the situations are varied 
and graphically set forth. With an actor of 
House Peters' attainment, and a heroine 
gifted with the charm and talent of Florence 
Vidor, no picture could fail to be interest- 
ing. Also there is Joseph Kligour in the 
cast, admirable in a character part. 



Alcazar 

"Topsy and Eva" meanders on its merry, 
inconsequent way, as popular as ever, with 
undiminished attendance. The Duncan Sisters, 
mischievous, vivacious Miss Rosetta, and an- 
gelic blonde Miss Vivian, are ideally cast 
in the title roles, while the pick of the Al- 



July 28. 1923 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 17 




CLOSED SECTION OF SUBWAY 



Plans for a tunnel under Market street at the Ferry loop have been approved and bids will 
be asked within ten days, it was announced yesterday. The tunnel, as indicated, will make possible 
uninterrupted traffic movement through the loop district in all directions at the same time. 



<XXXXXSV«XtfX*5«S*^*XJSXXXJ^\\V^^ 



cazar company lends them splendid support. 
This writer has been called to book for a 
carelessly made statement in last week's News 
Letter regarding the relative importance of 
Mrs. Catherine C. Cushing's connection with 
this Alcazar production, and now being more 
fully informed, hastens to say that Mrs. 
Cushing was active in the preparation from 
almost every angle; she even went so far 
as to read "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and good- 
ness knows that alone is a herculean task; 
she arranged the "Topsy and Eva" score 
and continuity, wrote the different parts and 
on several tense occasions during rehearsal, 
held the prompt book. Industrious Mrs. 
Cushing! Small wonder that she remon- 
strated when we did not know why her name 
occupied so much space on the program. 



Warfield Theater 

"The Fog," made in San Francisco with 
a cast of players including Mildred Harris, 
Cullen Landis, Louise Fazenda, Marjoric Pre- 
vost, Louise Dresser, Ralph Lewis and David 
Butler, will be on the screen at the Warfield 
Theater for the week commencing July 28. 
The picture was produced for Metro by Graf 
Productions, under the supervision of Max 
Graf, from the story by William Dudley Pel- 
ley. "A Night in India," a pretentious pro- 
duction, will be staged in elaborate fashion 
in two scenes, employing twenty persons, in- 
cluding a corps de ballet of ten, with Theo- 
dore Adolphus and Grace Eastman as the 



stars. The De Seus Trio, three jaunty sing- 
ers in naval uniform, are other principals 
in the act. "The Fog" is said to be a story 
of the solacing, maternal spirit of woman- 
hood triumphing over the woman who is an 
accomplice of Satan. 



Orpheum 

Sophie Tucker, the premiere jazzeuse of 
America, heads the bill at the Orpheum the 
week starting Sunday matinee, July 29. The 
accompanying show is strong in comedy, and 
features George Le Maire and Joe P. Phil- 
lips in their excrutiatingly funny travesty, 
"At the Dentist's." Billy Sharp, popular 
dancer-comedian, offers his 20th Century re- 
vue, a hodge-podge of music, dancing and 
comedy which includes Mile. Marionne. a 
dancer of rare ability, the Darling Sisters, 
delectable harmony singers, and an orchestra 
of syncopators. Gus Fowler, the "Watch 
King," the chronomical illusionist, who has 
been one of the mysteries of the English 
Magicles for many years, is making his first 
tour of America. Jack "Rube" Clifford, re- 
nowned portrayer of character roles, offers 
a keen satire of the international crimin- 
ologist. "Camera Eye Carter." Frank De 
Yoe. the musical comedy star, is an enter- 
tainer with a variety of individual methods, 
with Eddie Willie at the piano. Mildred 
and Dorothy Browne, two pretty and clever 
San Francisco girls who have attained fame 
in eastern vaudeville are accordionists who 



offer a varied program. Fifer and Bros, and 
Sisters, "Broadway's Youthful Stars," run 
the gamut of dancing possibilities in a gor- 
geously staged production. 




J ®vftWi^&\oux f ■ 



The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 



MATINEE DAILY 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

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Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folaom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 910 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Kconomy Durability 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



July 28, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



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1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Goush 
Telephone Park 271 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

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Kaies, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



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Tel. Franklin 8685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmltulng 

11. W. Culver M. Dauerer E. Johnson 




Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



South American Rubber Quiz Is Soon to 
Begin 

Committees of experts appointed by the 
Department of Commerce and Agriculture, 
respectively, will sail for South America 
within a few weeks to conduct the govern- 
ment's inquiry into the feasibility of produc- 
ing rubber in the United States. The official 
inquiry is making slow progress thus far, it 
is said in Washington, because of the con- 
flicting interests and differences of opinion 
amcng commercial rubber interests in this 
country. 

Opposition to the inquiry on the part of 
rubber proprietors and concessionaires in 
South America is anticipated. The investi- 
gation by United States is expected to show 
that their profits are high and also may lead 
to the transplanting of rubber to home soil, 
thus destroying or crippling the demand for 
Brazilian rubber in this country. 

Dodging the Ditches 

When passing other cars on a narrow 
road at night, one generally allows as much 
room as possible without running into the 
ditch. Due to inability to clearly see the 
ditch, however, a perpetual menace is pre- 
sented. Of course, a spotlight, trained to 
the ground toward the right-hand side and 
a little distance ahead, will eliminate many 
of the dangers. A small mirror fastened to 
a rod and attached to the right headlight 
bracket will act as a spotlight and will re- 
flect some of the light rays toward the ditch. 
The mirror should be slightly tilted down- 
ward so that the light is directed toward 
the ground. 



A Good Practice 

Keep track of your mileage for checking 
up on gasoline consumption and tire wear. 
Comparisons month by month, or year by 
year, will keep you posted on conditions. It 
is impossible to determine what efficiency 
either your motor or tires are giving you 
without an adequate record. 



Paris policemen are now provided with 
motorcycles that can carry four other officers 
of the law in the side car. 




LALAXXE 



J. BARKERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BEROKZ FRANKS 

OLD l'< h >] >LE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

k $1.25 r re in- 1 ■ Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to p. m. 

Also A La Carle 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 

FREE 

In a high class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboire & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 5S0 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 

Lighting Fixtures 
Shipmaii & Lauer 

131 S Polk St. Franklin 45S2 

Successors to 

ST1MMKI, ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



St. Mary's 
cAcademy 

Sao Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF PER- 
SONAL PROPERTY 

Under Sections 1861, 1861a and 1862, Civil Code 
of the State of California 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

Notice is hereby given that on Friday, 
August 10, 1923, at the hour of 12 o'clock 
M. of said day, in the baggage room of 
the premises of what is known as the Clift 
Hotel, situate at the South East corner of 
Geary and Taylor Streets in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, the undersigned will sell at public 
auction, for cash in Gold Coin of the Unit- 
ed States, the following described personal 
property: 

1 "Wardrobe trunk (black) 40 inches high, in- 
itialed A. E. J. 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 44 inches high. 

1 Hat trunk (black) 26 inches high, initialed 
A. E. J. 

Contents of above trunks wearing apparel. 

1 "Wooden box containing books. 

1 Large package containing articles of wear- 
ing apparel. 

7 Hat boxes containing hats. 

1 Suit box containing clothing. 

1 Shoe box containing shoes. 

1 Shoe box containing empty boxes. 

1 Gentleman's hat box containing various ar- 
ticles. 

1 Flower basket, 
being the property «>f Mrs. Carrie B. Johnston, 
Sacramento, < 'n.Iifornia. The said auction and 
sale will be made under and by virtue of tin- 
provisions of Sections 1861, 1861a and 1862 of 
the Civil Code of the State of California for the 
purpose of satisfying the lien of the under- 
signed I'D said personal property in the sum of 
$710.15, together with the costs of said sale, 
said lien being an Innkeeper's lien for the proper 
charges due from said Carrie B. Johnston for 
her accommodation, board and lodging and room 
rent, and for such extras as were furnished to 
her at her request and for moneys paid out for 
and ad\ onced to her. 

Hated San Francisco. California, June 22, 1923. 
CLIFT HOTEL CO., 
Ry Frederick C. Clift. 
President and Managing Director. 
A.LBERT I. LOE.B, Attorney at Law. 
202-203 Crocker, Bldg., San Francisco. Cal. 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




Practice limited to 


EYE, 


BAB, NOSE AND THROAT 


Hours 


10 to 5 — By Appointment — 


Saturday 


10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Removed to Suite r.s? Mebes Bide. 




177 TOST STREET 




Sun Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Baits Tressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyelnar and Cleaning- 
43S Mason St. Phon, Franklin 2510 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing: once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing: is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you Imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call In today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 8S5 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing: Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 66 Gearv Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing; manu- 
scripts for publication, which is Important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 
1174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurant- p Brofcer 

208 CROCKER BUTLJDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Views of "Old 
San Francisco " 

will give the old timers 
a reminiscent thrill, and 
all of us a new idea of 
San Francisco's growth. 
Here is Market street, 
before the days of au- 
tos; the St. Francis 
when it had but two 
wings; the Ferry Build- 
ing in '89; Sutter and 
Stockton streets in '80; 
the original Palm Court 
of the Palace Hotel, and 
many other interesting 
scenes, all done in su- 
perb photography. 
"Bits of Fashion" will 
intrigue the heart femi- 
nine, with its reproduc- 
tion of modes and mod- 
els from the world's 
fashion centers; there is 
an attractive page of 
"Sports;" prominent 
personages are pictured 
in "Around America" 
and "In European 
Lands," and in fact, 
there is a real treat for 
everyone tomorrow in 
The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 69S Douglas 4772 

Perpetual Care Fund 

On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than icemi nececiarr" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing: on* 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established H6S 
37-45 First Street - - San Frandac* 





•in i i n i 

miii mi m— - ■: 



WHEN you come 
to Oakland, meet 
your friends in the 
commodious lobby of 
Hotel Oakland. Then 
luncheon, tea or din- 
ner in our spacious 
dining rooms where 
the cuisine and service 
is unexcelled. 

Special attention given to 
dinner parties, banquets, 
and all social functions 




OTE48 

KLA* 



'W.C. cJurgervs Mqk-1 




CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




Getting 

better acquainted 

MANY women with 
heavy social obliga- 
tions find tea in the Palm 
Court a pleasant way of 
meeting and entertaining 
their widening circle of 
friends. 

— And of course there are 
the new tea concerts under 
the direction of Cy Trobbe. 

— Afternoon Tea, $Q cents 

OJ,e 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

dMonagement 
HALSEY E.MANWABJNC _ 



(Ms 



Established July 20, 1850 




PRICE 10 CENTS _ . $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 




ATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1 






LOS ANGELI 



>-\\>\\\\\<.\\\\\\ >\\\\\» \\\\\\\\\\\\\SN>\\\\\S>\\\\ X\XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX XXXXX%%»X »XSV»VXV 




A California Hlgbwaj — "X l!n>:i<l n 



^VNXNXNVXVXXXNXNNNXXXXVVXXXXXNNNVW^XXXy^XXVV^^^ 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



WALTER W. DERR 

.105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of tfac Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Slrecls 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement Si. and 7lh Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haiphtand Belvedere Slrcets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4)^) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be se it you on request. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 
Two Wall 

street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

raid Up Capital $15,000,000 S15.000.000 Beserre Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE. WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 





N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno I 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



—NOTICE— 

Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Montironiery St., between 
Sutter and IS u nil Sts. 

Special Dinner on 
Sundays, $1.00 

j Food excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining Room 

Prices Reasonable 

You are hound to be pleased when you 

eat at THE CLUB GRIM, 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 



•*J\ p < W ^'i'W^ H) " 1I«^V»'»I' 




Established July 20. I8J6 



10 mmm 




in 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




vol. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 4, 1923 



No. 5 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets. 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit Action and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— As we grow older, the herding instinct becomes stronger. 

— The foreign trade of the United States in the 9 years since 
the beginning of the war, is three-fourths as much as in the 125 
years preceding the war. 

— There is a minimum age for our National Executives; why 
not a maximum? And for all the national officials? Senile Sena- 
tors are not unknown at Washington. 

— It is stated that the author of "Yes, We have No Bananas," 
has made a profit of $60,000 on this silly song, which is a sad com- 
mentary on the mental state of the present age. 

* * * 

— In the book "Different Gods," by Violet Quirk, she says: "Only 
the cold people are free. The rest of us are shackled by the wishes, 
hates, fears and affections of those we love and of those whose 

wills are stronger than ours." 

* * ¥ 

— Mr. Rupert Hughes, author and picture director, who was 
Major in the Army Intelligence Service during the war, and spe- 
cialized in Polish affairs, has been decorated by the Polish Govern- 
ment with the "Polonia Restituta" grade of officer. Sounds inter- 
esting, but wonder what it would be worth, converted into cold 

cash? 

* * * 

— We glance occasionally through the mawkish twiddle of B°rn- 
hardt's love letters, now being published in the Chronicle. She says, 
on one occasion: "One needs only to be vulgar and make a noise, 
to become famous in America"; and on another: "Paris in Sum- 
mer is only fit for sewer rats and American tourists." How the 
Europeans have always scorned us,— all except our "vulgar" money! 

And they can't get enough of that I 

* * * 

—It is a queer thing that we cannot seem to learn the rudiments 
of the art of street decoration. Presidents ccme. one after the other, 
and the same crudities mark our efforts to show ourselves glad 
about it. We don't know of any more contemptible spectacle than 
the streets of San Francisco when they welcome the chief executive. 
Surely to goodness, we might learn how to hang out a few flags 
with some attempt at artistic values and be able to hide the cheap- 
ness of our calico adornments. Are there really some things that we 
can never learn? 



— Europe has been "drifting to ruin" for the past nine years, 
and yet she is still managing to exist, — some sections being in what 
might even be called a flourishing condition. It is time we turned 
our eyes inward, and discovered where we might improve some 
ruinous conditions in our own country. 

— Once let the new city merger with the San Mateo municipali- 
ties go through and keen men may make fortunes rapidly, in more 
than one way. We are not handing out any tips, but in two gene- 
rations from now they will be saying, "Yes, she is really very rich. 
Her grandfather made it at the time of the merger with San Mateo." 
Do a little thinking and see for yourselves what the chances are in 
this new, lucrative opportunity. 

— A public dance at Madrone Park, in Redwood Canyon, ends in 
the murder by gangsters, of a San Francisco boy. This criminal 
class is picking fights, and insulting women all around the bay re- 
gion, until (he different communities are really terrorized. Not long 
ago Mill Valley was the scene of their rowdyism. Prize fights and 
boxing contests, not to mention certain moving pictures, are respon- 
sible for this spread of hoodlumism. 

* * * 

— "Your California year runs along in a sort of pleasant mo- 
notony. Nothing happens in your seasons to give you a mental 
lift; and that's what I fear will make for mental stagnation," says 
visiting Henry Seidel Canby, editor of the New York Literary Re- 
view: and then he says: "What you are doing out here now is 
creating a definite type of civilization; something different in the 
world of men." Rather contradictory, what? 

— H. L. Mencken and Geo. Jean Nathan, editors of Smart Set 
and two of the cleverest writers in the United States, have pub- 
lished their "Josh Party" platform, offering themselves as candidates 
for President and Vice President. Some of their "planks" are 
"truths spoken in jest." For instance, they intend to "appoint audi- 
tors to find out what has become of all the money Americans have 
contributed for 'reconstruction' in Northern France;" and to "sup- 
press all the present British press bureaus operating in the United 
States;" and to "liberate at once all persons now held in Federal 

prisons for so-called political offenses." 
¥ ¥ * 

— A "bosses' questionnaire," — how will you like that. Mr. Busi- 
ness Man? The American Association of University Women of 
Chicago is going to arm its young women with this document when 
sent out to seek positions. To coincide with some of the questions 
which girls are asked, it should run something like this: How old 
are you? What is your religion? Are you married? How long have 
you been a widower? Is your wife dead? How many stenographers 
! ne you had. in the last year? Why did they leave? How much 
c ;d you pay them? Do you live at home? Are you of a patient 
oskkm? and so on, ad infinitum. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 




New York, and if we do not get them it is due only to low class 
politics. 



Senator Hiram Johnson is back. Already the welkin 
Hiram Is Back is ringing with the chant pagan of the progressive 
liberals, and the Waldorf-Astoria rocks to the stri- 
dent beat of Hiram's rhetoric. But, why the Waldorf-Astoria? Is 
there not something in the very name which will wake distrust among 
the honest farmers and the perspiring mechanics to whom the voice 
of the senator must appeal, if to any one? And, yet, with all his 
noise, he is obviously a wiser Hiram. He has seen other peoples 
and has arrived at the conclusion that, although we may consider 
that we have a higher morality than the rest of the world, the rest 
of the world is not impressed with our claims and, so far, has re- 
frained from placing any too much confidence in us. Europe is not 
hopeless, he says. He failed to see chaos in Europe; therefore, 
there is no chaos. 

Is chaos, in his view, dependent upon public disturbance and 
physical violence in the streets of the cities? If he looked for that, 
of course, he did not find it. It is not to be found, except at very 
widely separated times, and in widely distant places, even in ac- 
tual revolutionary times. But to look under the surface and to see 
what there is to be seen there, that is another and more difficult 
thing, which calls for the exercise of more than dramatic imagina- 
tion and power of appeal to the people. Europe is in a very 
dangerous situation. She has been in tight places before, but never 
since the fall of Rome has she been confronted not only with col- 
lapse, but with an invasion of the barbarians which the threatened 
communistic attack really implies. 

Now, we are substantially in agreement with the senator on the 
matter of the world court and the league of nations. We do not see 
how we can play into that game with any hope of success. But on 
the other hand, how are we to play any role in the rehabilitation of 
Europe unless we advance some of that abundant money which we 
have for the purposes of that rehabilitation? And how are we to se- 
cure such investments except by the issuance of bonds and such like 
financial measures? These are questions that have to be faced. There 
is not an American of any sense who wants to see this country em- 
broiled in the European mess and there is not a red-blooded Ameri- 
can on the other hand who does not want to see the prestige and posi- 
tion of his country thoroughly established. It may be conceded that 
there are grave difficulties in the way of a satisfactory solution in 
either direction; but it is the business of statesmen to offer proper 
solutions and not merely to talk. 



There is a great outcry just now in Europe 
Immigration Stations about the conditions of the immigration sta- 
tion at Ellis Island, where the crowding and 
generzrl uncleanliness are very much in evidence. There is no doubt at 
all that there is much cruelty in the way that newcomers are handled. 
There is no doubt also that, while a great deal of the suffering is un- 
avoidable, there is much of it that is due to low class of officials who 
are in charge of the handling of the immigrants. The management of 
such a mass of people who, for the most part, have not been accus- 
tomed to anything but coarse surroundings and who are ignorant of 
the language, must of necessity be somewhat strict. All the same, 
there is no excuse for dirt — and certainly no excuse for brutality. We 
are confident that there are no such flaws in the management of our 
local station at Angel Island. We should expect as good results at 



Did it ever strike you that we are a senti- 
Sentimental Egotism mental people? If not, it has struck the world 
in general. Nowhere is there such a field as 
here for the exploitation and capitalization of that sentimentality 
which is one of the most corroding and dangerous qualities and vices. 
There is no place in the whole world where sentimentality by itself 
is so powerful as here. Whether it be in the courts or in the church, 
in the street or on the stage, the ability to tap the endless resources of 
our sentimentality is a source of wealth and influence. So great is its 
power that our very statesmen dare not pretend to be statesmen, but 
must pervert their very beings in an effort to show that they are senti- 
mentalists, first and last. Even Woodrow Wilson, historian and patriot, 
was obliged by some inexplicable fate to cut his throat on the altar 
of national sentimentalism. 

But we are more than sentimentalists — we are sentimental egotists, 
who turn to ourselves in our sentimentality and demand of ourselves 
to sentimentalize ourselves. That is the reason that fakers in philoso- 
phy and psychology reap so rich a harvest. One so-called psychologist 
here asks the following questions in his pamphlet: "Am I balanced 
equally mentally and physically?" "Am I backward and self-con- 
scious?" "Do I grieve over disappointments?" "Do I say and do 
things for which I am afterwards sorry?" So he proposes many such 
questions, each of which appeals to the sentimental egotism of some 
man or woman and out of their weakness he reaps a golden harvest, 
through pure fakery. 

If it were not that the whole of our public life is honeycombed and 
weakened by just such questioning and turning inside out of one's 
self to one's own detriment, it would not be worth while to mention 
the matter. We do not grudge the knaves the trifle that they make 
out of our weakness, but we do grudge the weaknesses themselves, 
as they are debilitating and discouraging. 



For the first time in our national his- 
The President in Canada tory the President has visited our neigh- 
bors who speak the same language as 
we do and live under very similar institutions. Needless to say, the 
Canadians welcomed him with great enthusiasm and the City of 
Vancouver, with fifty thousand in the streets, had the fete day of its 
life. Also, needless to say, the President was warmed by the recep- 
tion and spoke as he had never spoken before on his trip. All of 
this is greatly to the good. This country and the great common- 
wealth lying to the north, being similar in institutions and language, 
can work out the destiny of this North America in peace and amity. 
Great patterns were woven on the little national island loom in the 
fogs and darkness of the North Sea, great and diversified patterns 
from the new cimmon wealths growing to greatness in the tropic seas 
to the great nations already grown up and adult in the North. To 
few races has such prestige been given. 



It is proposed to consolidate all territory in San 
The Borough Plan Mateo County lying north of Belmont with San 

Francisco; the idea being the original notion of 
the Three Cities Chamber of Commerce of San Mateo County. This 
is very fine, not only in its immediate and obvious results, but in more 
important ways. Thus, in addition to the mere annexation it is pro- 
posed to make a deep water harbor front off San Mateo, and 
thus add to the already extensive water front of San Francisco; to 
extend the municipal car system into San Mateo, and to thoroughly 
overhaul and examine and reconstruct, where necessary, the trans- 
portation system between the various parts of the new city and 



August 4. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



county. There is real progress in the development of this idea, and it 
should receive the approval of all citizens who desire to see our city 
progress in proportion to its deserts. Also, the chamber of commerce 
of the San Mateo cities is a wide-awake and forward-looking body. 



Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Broederick Hartwell, Bar- 
Liquor Lure onet, of England, is going to raise funds for a 
On the High Seas whiskey selling expedition on the high seas. A 
Parliamentary Commission now investigating the 
situation, has found a solution permitting the United States search- 
ing rights within a twelve mile zone. Five thousand cases have been 
arranged for, and Hartwell guarantees to return the invested money, 
plus 20 per cent interest within 60 days; and that the goods would 
be accepted and paid for, twenty miles off shore of the "un-named 
destination." 

It is declared that plans are made to send "abroad" (from Eng- 
land) at least 10,000 cases monthly. 

"The business is perfectly legal, and quite safe," Hartwell is 
quoted as saying; "It amounts to the fact that I am setting up a 
wholesale whiskey shop on the high seas." 

A profit of 20 per cent on one's money within 60 days! That, 
in itself, sounds alluring; and in addition, the possible adventure 
of "rum running," — the old, old fascination of "smuggling, — " the 
"un-known destination;" what romance in those words, — to what 
strange harbors will Lieutenant-Colonel Broederick Hartwell's ship 
sail into? Will his expedition be limited for any length of time to 
only one vessel? Under the enticing circumstances, we can see not 
only one ship sailing over the waters, but a whole Fleet of For- 
bidden Fruit, heading for, — what shores? 



She was a little German lady, who had left 
American Audiences her own country some time in the early sev- 
enties, and she held it in her memory as a 
blessed and ideal land, although at that time torn with war. She 
deplored the late great slaughter as much as we did, and many a 
conversation did we engage in, working among the flowers in the 
big garden that surrounded her spacious house and our tiny one, 
with its blossoming shrubs and trees and wind-swept lawns, over- 
looking the ever changing sea. 

Her criticisms of our country were severe, but always amusing, 
and sometimes deserved, and we used to love to listen to her chat- 
ter of "Shermany," and the Summer resort where she lived, and 
which some uncle of hers owned, and the wonderful concerts which 
were one of its features. The Sunday musicales, it seemed, were for 
the working classes; the Wednesday concerts for the "Noblesse," — 
but perfect silence was expected of both audiences during the time 
the orchestra performed; from what we gathered they were hardly 
allowed to breathe. 

"If anyone spoke, the leader would stop the moosic," we were 
told; "and they would not start again until all was quiet; it was 
an insult to the moosicians to make the smallest noise; but here, 
in America, ach! it was terrible; they shuffle; they cough; they talk; 
not for one moment can they keep quiet; they do not love the 
moosic as we do." 

The little German lady of the flowers is dead; an apartment house 
has crowded out the wide slope of lawn; the rest of the garden is 
neglected and forlorn; the little cottage does not harbor our hap- 
piness any more; only one is left of the trio who for so many years 
looked out over the jasmine vines and honeysuckle onto the blue 
bay; who spent so many golden days among the roses of that green 
hill-side. 

In these limes of gray loneliness, we sit for an hour or so of dis- 
traction in some play house, and just when the orchestra is ren- 



dering some especially exquisite selection, we find ourselves forced 
to endure the shuffling of restless feet all around us, the sniffling of 
noses that need attention, the clearing of throats, the inane laugh- 
ter of silly girls, the incessant jabber of the inattentive crowd; and 
we remember the little German lady's scorn of American audiences: 
"Here, in America, ach! it is terrible! not for one moment can 
they keep quiet; they do not love the moosic as we do!" 



n T . i , In the early hours of July 1 the harbor of New 
A Tragic Land v i . i n i i ■ . 

c D . York presented a scene unparalleled in human ex- 

ot rromise . „ , XI „ „ , ... 

penence, says the INew Statesman. A varied fleet 

of liners from the ports of Europe dashed up the channel, racing 
to discharge the thousands of immigrants who had timed their 
passage so as to land at the opening of the official year. Within 
a few hours half-a-dozen countries had exhausted their quotas for 
the first month, and now, day by day, thousands more are arriving, 
only to be turned back, either with or without an examination by 
the officials of Ellis Island. 

"The great majority of these wretched creatures belong to fami- 
lies who sold their possessions and pulled up their European roots, 
untroubled by a suspicion that the Land of Promise was not for 
them. Their miserable plight is the result of a practically inevi- 
table failure of co-ordination between the American consulates, the 
shipping companies, and the emigration agencies in Europe, and it 
may be taken for granted that tens of thousands of similar tragedies 
will occur throughout the remainder of the year. There is no hope 
that the restriction will be modified, notwithstanding the demand of 
the large employers in America for fresh supplies of unskilled 
labor. 

"The Trade Unions are against the lowering of the bars; the 
civic and education authorities have all they can manage, and the 
fear of an influx of revolutionary Europeans is almost universal. 
The British quota for the year is larger than any — 77,342. This is 
due to the fact that Ireland does not appear in the list as separate 
from Great Britain. Germany, which comes second, is the only large 
country which does not exhaust her quota." 



The dentist is a necessary evil; he brings 
Dentistry and Dentists blessing to you in disguise. The disguise is 

usually great pain. Nervous pain is some- 
thing it is very difficult to define. We cannot help believing the den- 
tist derives a ghoulish glee when he probes a nerve and see the start 
in his victim. That poor victim is helpless and cannot defend him- 
self. He cannot even defend himself while the dentist looks at him 
benevolently and gives that nerve another jab. He is satisfied that 
he has got just about as near to uncovering a quivering mass of 
pain, is next door to making his patient insane and then, in order 
to give the poor patient an idea of a different kind of nerve jar 
he shoots hot water into the cavity all the time watching the facial 
contortions of the one he is making suffer. Then when the relief 
comes and the nerve is settling down to a quiet state the versatile 
dentist thinks of something else and injects ice cold water where 
it will make the nerve jump most terrifically. "That hurts." he 
says, "Too bad, but it will be better soon." When he is through 
with pulling your cheeks out of shape, placing evil smelling sub- 
stances in your mouth, scratching and hammering and letting his 
infernal buzzers of various kinds perform their three ringed circus 
acts in your head he sends you home with comforting thought that 
vou will ache no more. But that is only a hope he has expressed — 
do not forget that. The dentist is the most hopeful cuss in the 
world. But, the Lord bless him. he is like women and we could not 
jet along without him. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 




By KEM 

"Man gives and Woman takes, 

Man makes and Woman saves, 

Man sees large and Woman small, 

Man makes the world. Woman the home, 

Man is the poet. Woman the audience, 

Man would sacrifice his home for the world's sake, 

Woman would sacrifice the world for her home's sake, 

Man joins, but woman separates." 

LOVE'S LEGEND by H. Fielding-Hall is the story of a honey- 
moon trip down a great river of Burmah, by a modern young 
couple. The husband is a man of extraordinary knowledge, a 
hater of conventions, and from the opening chapter we sense it is 
something deeper than romance that makes him want to take his 
young bride down the river where he had fought, whose water he 
had seen dyed with blood, lit up by fires where he had camped, 
and that had witnessed many years of both happiness and trouble. 
So, a little against her will, — for there is a spir.it of conflict in her 
that makes her resent his earlier life, full of interest before her 
coming — she consents to go as he desires, and we have the priv- 
ilege of seeing the river in all its changeful beauty, of getting ac- 
quainted with its history and the people along its banks, and best 
of all, living in the gaily trigged out raft with the man and woman, 

at first so conscious of each other, — "studying each other 

instinctively fighting for mental independence and individuality." 
Then comes the inevitable break, and their friend, Patrick, mourns: 
"I like love and peace, aye, and war, too, but all three mixed up 

together all the time are the very happiest marriages that?" 

But because the author is a clever craftsman, and the girl has what 
is most essential for a happy marriage (a willing-gladness to learn), 
and the man's nature is both big and loving, we find them at their 
journey's end — "no longer. two but one, conscious of each other 
only as the right hand is of the other," and we leave them regret- 
fully, as one leaves friends — hoping all will be well and feeling the 
better for having known them. 
Dutton. $3. 

NORTH OF 36, by Emerson Hough, is a story of pioneer life 
back in 1867. We owe a debt of gratitude to the author of "The 
Covered Wagon" for chronicling the history of the "Crossing of 
the Plains" to Oregon and California, and our debt is now aug- 
mented by this story of the Chisholm Trail and the dauntless little 
heroine who took a drove of cattle over it from Texas to Kansas. 
There is an abundance of historical data for the student, dramatic 
adventure and action for the excitement-eater and romance for fem- 
ininity. The recent death of Emerson Hough leaves us the poorer 
for a writer of worth-while Western fiction, unless the note he has 
struck will stir others to go as deep into Western lore and human 
interests. D. Appleton & Co. $2. 

Suggestions for Vacation Reading Continued: 

"Under a Thousand Eyes" by Florence Bingham Livingston. A 
New York girl finds romance in a small town. Cosmopolitan, $2. 

"Vision of Desire" by Margaret Pedlar. Satisfying romance of 
English society life for those who like an "Ethel Dellish" sort of 
novel. Doran, $2. 



"Man Who Lived in a Shoe" by Henry James Foreman. Story 
of a New York young man who had other people's children prob- 
lems to solve. Little, Brown & Co., $1.90. 

"Corduroy" by Ruth Comfort Mitchell. Good, clean, outdoor 
California story. D. Appleton & Co., $2. 

"The Losing Gain" by Blanche Upright. San Francisco story. 
Theme: Is a woman's place in the home? Watt, $2. 

"Public Square" by Will Levington Comfort. A good deal about 
New York newspaper life — a red-headed heroine, and a worth-while 
hero who gets much of interest out of present-day India. D. Ap- 
pleton & Co., $2. 




The longer yon brew- 




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Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

« PAUL ELDER'S 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



August 4, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




TownMLCrier 



& WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 
. "ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
] DEVIL,SIR WITH VOUr 

— Shakspeare. 



— It is worth noting that the man makes the job. Given a man 
of unusual talents, and any job that he may take on will imme- 
diately begin to show the application of those talents, and become 
distinguished owing to the natural distinction of the man. Chief 
Vollmer of Berkeley is being implored to take the place of the chief 
of police of Los Angeles. Vollmer had no great chances in life; 
in fact, every step has been made with difficulty and under hard 
conditions. He had no political pull; the politicians who are natur- 
ally distrustful of real ability having always been against him. So 
he is pressed to leave a small town for a great city. And the point 
is that in the hands of Vollmer, the office of Chief of Police takes 
on an unusual importance and becomes a matter of interest to the 
world as a whole. So that, should Vollmer accept, all the world 
will note what he is doing. After all, it is not the office, but the man. 



— The charges of trustification and violation of the laws in con- 
nection with the sale of building supplies here are finding their 
counterpart in the prosecution of the members of the St. Louis 
Lumber Trade Exchange. They have been found guilty of violat- 
ing the state anti-trust laws. These anti-trust laws are really very 
great nuisances, and proceed from the intrusion of politicians into 
realms of economics with which they are notoriously unfamiliar. 
The public has to be supplied and the more economic the method 
of supply the better for the public in the long run. If it should 
come to the point of actual monopolies tyrannically exercising their 
power, that can be dealt with in due course. But it is not there. 



— We have been very patient with the administration, giving it 
all the credit possible and hoping from week to week that the plans 
of the governor would mature into something that was really of 
value to the community. They may so mature, but there is a whole 
lot of unnecessary suffering on the part of innocent people. The 
fact that $300,000 is tied up, this money consisting for the most 
part of wages, is proof in itself that many people are very troubled 
and unhappy. And these are innocent, working folk that are not 
in politics and have harmed no one. This sort of thing should not 
be allowed to happen. 



— There was really a sober note in the hotels at lunch hour on 
Saturday when the news came that the president was so ill. Big 
men, on the verge of being elderly, cannot stand up to ptomaines 
very well and before one o'clock the young sports were betting on 
the life of the chief executive who thereupon became an object 
of real interest for a few minutes to those patriotic and successful 
citizens who otherwise would not give him a minute's thought. This 
being great and successful is more or less of an illusion and our 
young people have no instinct towards the worship of a politician. 

— They say that a British ship landed three million dollars worth 
of liquor here within the last few days. I wonder if that is so. I 
have, personally, run across no evidence of the landing and three 
million dollars worth, even at current rates, should be quite a lot. 
To show how differently prohibition is regarded here in comparison 
to other laws, it is only necessary to note the glee with which the 
most decorous newspapers have recorded the incident. Also the joy 
with which they state that another landing steamer is already out 
of the three-mile limit. It is all very absurd. 



— Something should be done to discourage the efforts of news- 
paper photographers, or at least to make them more productive of 
results, corresponding with their subjects. You may not have no- 
ticed that the reproductions of the faces of Hoover the Great were 
as near grotesques as the law allows. Since the prohibition move- 
ment realized its goal, I have always been a bit doubtful about 
the remains of our traditional liberties, but all doubts vanish. In 
no other country could such pictures of a cabinet-minister .have been 
printed, without bringing about the summary imprisonment of the 
photographer. Even Trotsky would not have stood for it. Being 
convinced, however, that nobody could be quite so ugly as the papers 
made Hoover, I went around to take a personal look at him and to 
reassure myself. There he was, dimpled and sweet, a bit pinky and 
a bit pursey, but lots better looking that Beverly Hodgehead, and 
the papers seem to make him. How on earth can we ever get over 
this insult to the man who did politics with flour? 



— I have a notion, born of experience, that the coal business 
would bear a bit of investigation in this city. Like a good house- 
keeper, and with the bitter knowledge of former winters, The Town 
Crier went a-buying coal the other day. The variations in the 
prices asked by different dealers for the same class of fuel aroused 
his attention, and after an investigation he felt pretty certain that 
there was a gouge somewhere. Now most of us are liable to the 
feeling that we are being "stung" when prices are higher than we 
anticipate, and it does not play fair to take one's own judgment in 
the matter. But further enquiries among the knowing ones tended 
greatly to increase the first incredulity and ended by convincing 
that some action should be taken to curb the dishonest practices 
of some of the coal dealers. 



— I wonder if striking is a sort of malady against which nothing 
can prevail, or if it is a sort of psychological aberration which comes 
along from nowhere in particular and without any real cause? Here, 
the boiler makers are striking at the local shipbuilding works. And 
this is happening at a time when they are getting higher wages, 
both absolutely and relatively, than they ever had before and when 
the state of the rest of the world is such that they are princes in 
comparison. It would not take much to tip over the applecart here, 
and some day when the auto is stalled because they cannot buy oil 
and the landlord is getting out ejectment papers, they will realize 
their folly. Times are good here. For the sake of commonsense, 
don't spoil them! 
* ■ • — ■ — .—..—. — .—.—.+ 



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EI.MER M. WOOPBtRY Manaper 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

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Telephone Batter •!!• Under Management CARL 3. STA.VLET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 



THE RUHR AND GREAT BRITAIN 

By JULES JOFFRE 

Stanley Baldwin, the new premier of Great Britain, is trying his 
hand at bringing France and England into accord. I say England 
because it is not really Great Britain which is concerned as to affairs 
at the Ruhr. England is very deeply concerned and her concern is 
based on business, — the business of England of the future. England 
cannot afford, Mr. Baldwin believes, to allow France to win through 
the occupation of the Ruhr and the eventual accord [hat will surely 
come when Germany surrenders and the re-adjustment takes place. 
The aim of England's premier statesman is to bring about some sort 
of clash between Belgium and France, and through this arrive at 
a better position from which to aim renewed blows at France. Lloyd 
George, the arch opportunist of the age, and on whom and Wood- 
row Wilson may be blamed the reason for the chaotic condition 
now existing in Europe, is an able assistant to anyone desiring to 
attack France. He shoots his barbs weekly through the English 
and the American yellow press. Public opinion in Canada and in 
Australia, India and Africa, in the English dominions and depen- 
dencies, may be relied upon to see the Ruhr situation much more 
clearly than does the Englishman and to see the end in a much more 
cheerful frame of mind than do English financiers, manufacturers 
and politicians. Last week Poincare and Theunnis made quite clear 
to Mr. Stanley Baldwin exactly where they stand on this question 
of occupation of the Ruhr and reparations. France will not under- 
take any negotiations with Germany until such time as Germany 
stops posing as the Great Professional National Bankrupt and quits 
her questionable policies to undertake to pay her debts. 



AN EDITOR PASSES 

Thomas E. Flynn was an editor who had left the impress of his 
work on San Francisco and on its citizenship. He was thoroughly 
of the great city but had his own ideas as to what should be done 
and was never afraid to express his views. He had a keen know- 
ledge of the political side of things and his ideas as to men and 
measures were usually most sound. Through his long life in San 
Francisco and his friendship for men in the state at large he was 
capable of showing a judgment which was based on facts and not 
on fancy. 

Tom Flynn, as he was familiarly known, was to a very great 
extent popular among the men about town and his connection with 
the big daily papers and his long association with the weeklies gave 
him an extraordinary opportunity to make his views known to the 
world. He was possessed of a biting wit and could write sparkling 
articles. His editorials always were strong and to the point. He 
had experience in many lines besides the one he loved the most- 
writing. He had a knowledge of the art of photo engraving and he 
had made money in real estate transactions. Right after the fire 
he was one of the first to see a revived San Francisco and, in con- 
nection with that vision, he also saw the opportunity to make money 
and seized upon it. This soon placed him in an independent po- 
sition, which he held to the time of his death. 

Those who knew Tom Flynn intimately had an opportunity to 
learn of his deep knowledge and of his love of literature. It was 
given to but few to know this and to these Tom Flynn was a joy 
when he unbent and let people see into the storehouse of his brain. 

His editorship of the old Wasp was marked by very brilliant 
work and as editor of the San Francisco News Letter he carried 
conviction to his readers and his writing often flayed those whom 
he believed to be in the wrong. Of late years he had not done very 
much active work and was constantly ill. His passing away leaves 
many who mourn him. The sympathies of all of these go to his 
widow. 



A NEW INSURANCE POLICY 

The new Personal Property Floater policy which the Phoenix 
and Equitable Insurance Companies are putting out is creating con- 
siderable talk on the street. This policy has all the features of the 
Tourist Floater policy and in addition thereto covers the personal 
effects of the assured or any member of his family against robbery, 
pilferage and larceny, in any location in the United States and Great 
Britain, excepting in the permanent residence of the assured or while 
in storage. It is presumed that this policy will be issued on an an- 
nual basis and will cover theft of wearing apparel from a restau- 
rant, an office or a club, as well as robbery. More inquiries have 
been received regarding this policy than any contract that has been 
put out for some time. 



W. B. LARKINS OFF ON NORTHERN TRIP 

W. B. Larkins of Larkins and Company, automobile painters and 
body and top builders, left last Tuesday for the Northwest with the 
Rotary Club. Larkins is an enthusiastic member of the organiza- 
tion and takes a prominent part in all its affairs. 

However, he intends going farther than the Rotarians. In fact, 
he declared before leaving that he intended touring the entire North- 
west territory in his car. Larkins is a great lover of the "Call of 
the Open Road," and whenever he gets the opportunity he visits 
the scenic spots in this vicinity. 



THE MARINE BOOTLEGGER 

It has been recognized for a long time among the elite In govern- 
ment enforcement of prohibition, that there were legitimate and il- 
legitimate marine bootleggers. The legitimate is the fellow who comes 
a-roystering along and anchors just outside the three mile limit 
and conducts his bar at wholesale and in the glare of the noonday 
sun, or under the light of a silvery moon. The illegitimate fellow 
is he who comes in under the guise of a French, British, Dutch, or 
ether kind of foreign craft and flag and deals his Scotch and other 
whiskeys to the right and to the ieft — as stores or medicinal ne- 
cessities. Now, Uncle Sam will try to see if he can prevent this 
by seizing the stocks of liquor as the vessels tie up in New York 
and other ports. This is being looked upon as a humorous incident 
but it is well to remember it might very easily lead to the most ser- 
ious complications with foreign powers, whose rights we undoubtedly 
invade, infringe and break in our attempt to enforce prohibition. 



THOUGHTS FROM "THE CLASH." 

"There is no society; there is only an extraordinary confusion 
into which someone dropped a Jew, so that the whole mixture has 
tasted of him ever since." 

"A woman's passion for her husband lasts a year — perhaps longer, 
perhaps not so long. After that, it is a quiescence and a placid dull- 
ness." 

"It is impossible to respect a person one is deceiving, more espe- 
cially when one's lies are successful." 

"We spend our lives inventing splendid words for our mean deeds 
and meaner thoughts. No one could bear to live unless he con- 
ceived himself to be finer than his achievements." 

"To make marriage possible requires an amazing forebearance and 
tenderness on both sides, fostered by a blindness which is called 
love; as soon as you begin to criticize your partner you are done." 

"Love may make the world go round, but it makes it spin round 
so fast that it causes most of us to get too giddy for safety." 

"Only by mistakes does one learn anything." 

"Memories always seem good." 



August 4, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




(Editor's Note: The following poem was written by Ralph Chaplin, 
one of our "conscientious objectors" sentenced to twenty years' 
imprisonment, but recently released from jail by President Harding.) 

MOURN NOT THE DEAD 

Mourn not the dead that in the cool earth lie — 

Dust unto dust — 
The calm, sweet earth that mothers all who die 

As all men must; 

Mourn not your captive comrades who must dwell — 

Too strong to strive — 
Within each steel-bound coffin of a cell, 

Buried alive; 

But rather mourn the apathetic throng — 

The cowed, the meek — 
Who see the world's great anguish and its wrong 

And dare not speak. 



THE PEPPER TREE 

By Carrol De Wilton Scott 
A pioneer from a tropic shore 

Easily taking a native's ways; 
Humble enough for the home-yard door. 

Beautiful, earning each man's praise. 
Ever the same as the seasons go; 

Willowy branches trailing in sheaves 
Sport of the tenderest winds that blow. 

Netting the sunbeams through lacy leaves; 
Ripening clusters of coral beads 

For winter days when color is rare, 
Shedding romance of Mission deeds 

Over the hurrying thoroughfare. 

— From "American Poetry Magazine." 



RAIN AT DUSK 

By Ethel Brooks Stillwell 
Sharp spears of cedars in black silhouette 

Against a starless waste of dripping sky. 
Black pavements, slippery and shining wet, 

A golden blur of motors gliding by. 

Acacia trees, beneath whose friendly arc 

A sidewalk tunnels up the avenue; 
A certain window shining through the dark. 
An open door, a light, a fire — and you! 

— From "American Poetry Magazine." 



RENEWAL 

If the sum of all sorrow were given to me 
I would fling it afar to the hungry sea; 
But even as I turned, with empty hands. 
Around me would gather the sorrowing lands. 
— Francis Shaw, in "Poetry." 



RENUNCIATION 

Though you are lovely as the light of day 

And perfumed as a courtesan of kings. 

You are not worth a fragment of the things 

That for your beauty I have given away. 

What shall I find in you to take the place 

Of books and friends and quiet wondering, 

And battle and sweat and the world's thundering? — 

Only the fading glory of your face. 

I have lost the bread of life for one brief rose, 

And living waters for a drop of wine: 

Far-off I hear the gates of darkness close 

On promised lands that never shall be mine. 

Thus morning after morning I cry in pain, 

And night after night I come to you again. 



"Poetry.' 



— Margery Swift. 



MEDITATION 

I thought that I was born to dance, 
To mingle in the gay, mad throng. 

To play with tempting, daring glance — 
Toss back the song. 

But somehow, life has turned so gray, 

I've time to wonder if, perchance, 
Instead, I should have tried to pray, 



That — or the dance? 



Rebecca Strutton Elliot. 



'American Poetry.' 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 



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I 

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Ball Rooms of the Past 



I By A PIONEER | 

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AS in many other ways the pioneers were first in the field in 
giving entertainments in hotel parlors. In the latter part of the 
fifty decade there were very few, almost none of the homes of 
that early day large enough in which to give large parties, and 




The Occidental Hotel, Much Patronized by the Clergy in the 

'Sixties and 'Seventies 

therefore many of them were given in the large parlors of the old 
Oriental Hotel. There were then but three hotels in San Francisco 
that catered to the better class of residents and transient visitors. 
These were the Oriental Hotel that stood at the juncture of Mar- 
ket, Bush and Battery streets; the International on Jackson street 
near Montgomery, and the Tehama House on Sansome and Cali- 
fornia, which was much patronized by the Army. There was an- 
other, the "What Cheer House," on Sacramento street, where all 
the employes, including chambermaids and cooks, were men, and 
men only were received as guests. The International Hotel was 
the newer one of the three, and all the rooms there were "hard 
finished." The Oriental was the oldest, and the most popular as 
well as the most exclusive. It was a ccmbination of old and new, 
inasmuch as though many of the rooms were hard finished, still 
a large number of the bedroom walls were merely heavy canvass 
covered with wali paper, so that frequently conversations held in 
some of them could be heard also in others some distance away. 

The most notable of the balls given at the Oriental was the 
fancy dress one which Mrs. Hitchcock gave to celebrate the 1 6th 
birthday of her daughter, Lily, the Hitchcocks then living in a tiny 
cottage on Bush street where the Brooklyn Hotel stood afterwards. 

Next in line was the first ball given by Mr. and Mrs. W. C. 
Ralston soon after their marriage, in May, 1859. Third was the 
ball in 1860. of which Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Dewey were the hosts 
and the guest of honor their son, Eugene. 

When later on, early in the sixty decade, the dining rooms of 
the newer hotels were in great demand for ball purposes, the Cos- 
mopolitan Hotel on Bush street inaugurated theirs in December, 



1864, by a grand fancy dress ball to which all society went. Then 
came the ball given at the new Occidental by General and Mrs. 
McDowell in January, 1865, which John F. Swift immortalized in 
his novel of Robert Greathouse. And six months later, in July, 1865, 
it was again the scene of a ball given by the young men of society 
in compliment to the officers of the flag ship "Lancaster." When 
the new dining room of the Lick House was finished, its inaugura- 
tion was celebrated by a grand ball in February, 1867, and on an- 
other occasion it was chosen for the ball given by the city in honor 
of General Sherman in September, 1870. 

These were but a few, but the most prominent of that period of 
balls given at these hotels; also the wedding reception given in 
the Lick House dining room when Miss Betty Jones was married. 

All these hotels were favored by different lines of guests. The 
Cosmopolitan attracted the Army, the Clergy went to the Occi- 
dental, while all the English visitors of note were to be found at 
the Lick. It was amusing to hear them speak of it as Lick House, 
emphasing each of the two words equally, and most emphatically. 

Intense, therefore, was the excitement caused in our smart set 
by the first specially erected ball room. It was something to talk 
about, to write about, and to date from, for many years. Mr. Wil- 
liam Barron was the host on this occasion who, with his brother, 
Pepe (popularly so called), and Mr. Thomas Bell, kept bachelor's 
hall in his handsome house on Stockton street hill, in later years 
being the home of the Antoine Borels. The reason for the ball was 
the marriage of Miss Francesca Walkinshaw and Mr. Sam Price, in 




The "What Cheer House" on Sacramento Street, Where All the 
Employes Were Men, and Men Only Were Received as Guests 

whose honor it was given in September, 1863. The house, though 
a good one for those days, was not, Mr. Barron thought, large 
enough to comfortably entertain the many friends whom he wished 
to invite. The result was a room so perfect in every detail that 
regrets were freely expressed that it had to be torn down the next 



August 4, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 








The Beautiful Picture Gallery in the Old Colton House on Nob 
Hill Was Frequently Used as a Ball Room 

day. Following the example of Mr. Barron, the Hall McAllisters, 
who then lived in the house adjoining the old French Consulate on 
Jackson street near Mason, were the next to build a room, which 
they did for the ball they gave in November of the same year — 
1863. It was an ideal ball room with one exception, the ventilators 
were all put in around the base of the room and the skirts of the 
matrons as they stood or sat around the walls effectually closed 
them so that the place became intensely hot. The services of a 
carpenter were called on, and he with a saw soon relieved the sit- 
uation by cutting several windows, and the dancers were given 
plenty of air. The third and most expensive of the specially built 
ball rooms was erected for the goodbye ball given by Mrs. W. C. 
Ralston at her home on Fremont street, March 4, 1867, on the 
eve of her departure for Europe where she spent a couple of years. 
Like all the Ralston entertainments, everything was on a grand 
scale, even the Cotillion was so large it had two leaders, — Mr. 
James Wilson at one end, and Major John H. Wilson, Calif., U. S. 
A., at the other end, and the favors were the most elaborate that 
had yet been given by any hostess. 

The Thomas H. Selbys were the first to have a permanent ball 
room built as an addition to their house on Harrison street, and 
many a brilliant function was held therein. It was a delight to go 
to the Selby balls, there was so much space for dancing, and one 
met everyone worth meeting, both among the residents of the city, 
and the transient visitors to these golden shores. 

The Pepe Barrons used their very large billiard room for danc- 
ing purposes, whenever they gave a very large party, and in the 
Colton house on Nob Hill their beautiful picture gallery served as 
a ball room when needed. 

There was only one occasion that a theater was turned into a 
ball room, so often the case in other cities. This was when a ball 
was given in aid of the Mount Vernon Fund, and took place in 
the American Theater on Sanscme street. June 1, 1859. The Par- 
quette of the theater was boarded over, making it on a level with 
the stage, covered with white crash, and the whole place artistically 
draped with the flags of all nations, making it a spacious and delight- 
ful ball room. 

Mrs. William Blanding. who was vice-regent for California, re- 
ceived the guests who comprised all the society of San Francisco, 
. and was assisted by Mrs. Louis McLean, Mrs. R. J. Vandewater. 
Mrs. Harrison Randolph. Mis. S. P. Dewey. Mrs. Chamberlain and 
Miss Sarah Haight. 



" HEARD IT? 

— A temperance orator was in the habit of holding forth in a 
workmen's hall, and was constantly being interrupted, so he engaged 
a prize-fighter to sit in the gallery and keep order. He was con- 
trasting the clean content of home life with the squalor of drunken- 
ness. "What do we want when we return home from our daily 
toil? he asked. "What do we desire to ease our burdens, to glad- 
den our hearts, to bring smiles to our lips and joy to our eyes?" 
As the orator paused for breath, the prize-fighter shook his fist at 
the unruly members of the gallery and whispered in a loud un- 
dertone, "Min, the first bloke what says 'beer' I'll throw outside." 



— The maid had been with the family for some years, so that 
when she applied to her mistress for leave from Friday to Monday 
to visit her home, which was some distance away, as all the family 
were desirous of meeting to celebrate their parents' golden wed- 
ding, permission was readily granted. On Monday the maid 
duly returned, and her mistress said to her, "Well, Mary, how did 
you get on?" "Oh, splendid, ma'am," was the reply, "and mother 
was so grateful to you for letting me go." "Yes, and your father, 
what did he say?" asked her mistress. "Lor' bless you, ma'am," 
answered the maid, "he wasn't there; he died twenty years ago." 

* * * 

— The old groom was giving his master's son some lessons in 
riding, and teaching him to handle a hunter when taking a fence. 
The boy proved a very apt pupil, and did so well that the old man 
became quite lavish in his praise, so that at length, fired with am- 
bition, the youngster essayed a regular "snorter," resulting in the 
horse and rider parting company, the latter being shot out of the 
saddle over the fence. The old groom, wishing to soothe the lad's 
wounded pride, remarked in tones of admiration: "That was a 
very fine jump, sir, and just the way I do it myself, sir," adding, 
after a pause, "only I always manage to take the hoss with me. 

* * * 

— A doctor was called in to attend a working man. Having done 
all he could for the time being he told the patient's wife to take 
her husband's temperature in the morning. On the following day 
when the doctor called he asked if she had done what he told her. 
"Well, we hadn't a thermometer in the house," she said, "but I put 
the barometer on his chest and it went to 'Very dry,' so I gave him 
a pint of beer, and he's gone to work." 

* * # 

— A lady in Scotland had had great trouble with her gardeners, 
not one of whom was capable of keeping sober. At last she appealed 
for help to her brother, who promised to do all he could for her, 
and finally announced that he had found just the very man she 
needed. "I'll only ask ye one question." she said. "Is he a tee- 
totaller?" "Weel." replied her brother, "he's no just what ye'd ca' 
a teetotaller, but he's a mon ye canna fill." 

* * * 

— A lady was very astonished to discover one day how well her 
Irish servant could write. "Why Bridget," she said. "I had no idea 
you could write so nicely." The girl smiled proudly, '"lis, mum, 
she said, "me wroitin' has got me mony a place. I wroite all av 
me own recommendations. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 




ocier 




busi cupid 

MERRILL-DUNCAN — The marriage of Miss Frances Merrill and 
Robert Duncan took place Wednesday evening at the First 
Congregational Church. The ceremony was read by Dr. 
James L. Gordon, followed by a small reception and supper 
in the Italian room at the Hotel St. Francis for members of 
the family and intimate friends. Miss Merrill chose Miss 
Betty McGee for her maid of honor, and the bridesmaids were 
Miss Thieline McGee, Miss Janice Dunker, Miss Virginia Sar- 
gent and Miss Ruth Fishbeck. Vernon Summerfleld was best 
man, and the ushers included William Sheldon, Harry Sears 
Bates Jr., Kenneth Hunter, William Shields, Lindley Abbott 
and Paul Stewart. 

CALDWELL-OLNEY — The engagement of Miss Constance Cald- 
well, daughter of Mrs. W. W. Caldwell of Pasadena, to John 
McLean Olney, son of Warren Olney Jr. of Berkeley, has 
been announced. The bride-elect is planning to visit the 
Olneys. one of the pioneer families of California, with her 
mother later on, when she will be the motif of a number of 
parties. No date has been set for the marriage. 

JOHNSON-VOUGHT — Miss Frances Johnson, daughter of Mrs. 
James Ward, whose engagement to Mr. Russell Vought was 
announced several months ago, has chosen Saturday, August 
11, as the date of her marriage. The wedding will take place 
at Lake Alta in Placer county, where the Wards have an at- 
tractive summer home. It will be an out-of-doors affair and 
will be held at high noon. 

LUNCHEON 

CAMERON — Mr. and Mi's. George Cameron entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Welch informally at luncheon on Sunday and Wednes- 
day Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin gave a luncheon in honor 
of Mrs. Welch. 

PIERCE — Mrs. Ira Pierce entertained a group of friends at 
luncheon and mah jongg at her home on Jackson street last 
Friday afternoon. 

McNEAR — Mrs. Fred McNear gave a luncheon on Thursday at 
Menlo Park for Mrs. Welch. 

SHARON — In honor of Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon, who has been 
entertained at a round of affairs since her arrival in Cali- 
fornia, Mrs. Rennie P. Schwerin was a luncheon hostess last 
Friday. The party was given at the Schwerin home in San 
Mateo. 

SCOTT — The home of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Scott of Burlingame 
was the setting for an attractive out-of-doors luncheon last 
Sunday. 

LORD — Mrs. Marion Lord was hostess to a number of her friends 
at the Hotel St. Francis Monday. 

WELCH — Mrs. Andrew Welch was hostess to a few friends at 
the Hotel St. Francis Monday, bowing to friends everywhere. 

ARTSIMOVITCH — Countess Valdimir Artsimovitch of Paris was 
the guest for whom Mrs. George T. Marye gave a luncheon 
Tuesday at the Burlingame Country Club. Mme. Artsimovitch 
was formerly Mrs. Beulah Hobbs Jones, one of the most 
beautiful women of San Francisco society. 

TAYLOR — Miss Frances Taylor and Miss Sara Redington of 
Santa Barbara will leave within a week for New York, to 
sail during the month of August for Europe. Tbey will enjoy 
a season of travel through foreign countries. Miss Taylor 
gave a farewell luncheon to a group of her most intimate 
friends Thursday afternoon. 

DINNERS 

RECH — Mr. Gilbert Rech, who arrived last week from Chicago, 
entertained at a stag dinner Tuesday evening at the Family 
Club. Mr. Robert Duncan, whose marriage to the host's step- 
daughter, Miss Frances Merrill Wednesday, was the guest of 
honor. 

LEE — One of the small affairs on last week's social calendar 
was the dinner which Miss Rosamonde Lee gave at the Hotel 
St. Francis. The Misses Rosamonde and Margaret Lee, with 
their mother, Mrs. Erba Webber Lee, have been occupying 
an attractive apartment on Russian Hill since their return 
from Carmel. They are moving soon into their own home on 
Pierce street. 



HILL, — Mr. and Mrs. Horace Hill gave a dinner Saturday even- 
ing at their home in Los Altos and entertained friends from 
■ down the peninsula. 

HILL — One of the enjoyable affairs last Sunday evening was the 
supper in San Mateo at which Mrs. Fentress Hill was hostess. 
The party was held in compliment to Mrs. Hill's sister, Mrs. 
Arthur Chesebrough, who has been spending the past few 
days in the country as her house guest. Bidden to meet the 
visitor from the South were Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ettore Avenali, Mr. and Mrs. William Devereux, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmunds Lyman, Mrs. Templeton Crocker and 
Mr. Frederick Tillmann. 

BOYD — One of the enjoyable affairs of last week was the dinner- 
dance given by Miss Louise Boyd at "Maple Lawn," her 
San Rafael home. Among the guests who accepted her hos- 
pitality were: Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Kingsbury, Mr. and 
Mrs. Benjamin Dibble, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Lilley, Mr. 
and Mrs. Edwin Eddy, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dibblee, Mr. and 
Mrs. George Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Bothin, Mr. and 
Mrs. Seward B. McNear, Mr. Frank D. Madison and Mr. Rob- 
ert Henderson. 

MILLER — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Miller entertained Thursday eve- 
ning at a small dinner at their home in Clay street. 

WITTER — Mr. and Mrs. Dean Witter have returned from Eu- 
rope, after a few months' absence, and are being welcomed 
by their friends. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Noyes will give a din- 
ner for them next Tuesday evening at the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club. 

TEAS 

HEYNEMANN — Mrs. Manfred H. Heynemann of Belvedere en- 
tertained at a large tea at the Fairmont Hotel on Monday 
afternoon in honor of Miss Hausa Mehta of Baroda, India, 
who is a noted visitor in San Francisco. 
BRIDGE 

ADDIS — Mrs. Thomas Addis has issued cards for a bridge party, 
which she will give at her home in Sausalito on Tuesday, Au- 
gust 7, in honor of Mrs. Taliaferro Milton, who is in Cali- 
fornia for the summer. 

HENDRICKSON — Mrs. William Hendrickson Jr. gave a bridge 
and mah jongg party at the Seward B. McNear home in Ross 
Wednesday afternoon in honor of Mrs. Winthrop Austin, the 
former Miss Helen Tallant. 

GRAVES — Mrs. Carroll Graves, wife of Commander Graves, U. 
S. N., retired, gave a bridge party and tea Wednesday at her 
home in Jackson street. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

DRUM — Mrs. John Drum returned to her home in Burlingame 
Monday after a short visit with relatives in Santa Barbara. 
She will he in the peninsula city for a few days and will then 
join her husband at their other country home at Lake Tahoe. 

FORD — Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Waterlow Ford and their three 
sons, Masters Bobbie, Dick and Jimmy Ford, have come up 
from their ranch at Merced to spend several weeks in Marin 
county. They are guests of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Davis at 
their home in Ross. 

TAYLOR — Mr. and Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor departed this 
week for Portland, where they will visit the latter's sister, 
Mrs. Allen Lewis. For the past three weeks, Mr. and Mrs. 
Taylor have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Robert Oxnard at 
"Two Rivers," the Oxnard camp near Feather river. 

HEITMAN — Mr. and Mrs. William Anthony Heitman (Mrs. Mar- 
garet Sudden) have returned from Los Angeles. They are 
living at the bride's home on Washington street. 

WEILL — Mr. and Mrs. Michael Weill, who have been in Paris, 
have returned. For the past fortnight they have been out of 
town on a motor tour of the North. 

FILER — Mrs. Walter G. Filer and her daughter, Miss Lawton 
Filer, returned Monday to their home in Burlingame after 
a ten days' visit in Santa Barbara. 

LYMAN — Mr. and Mrs. Edmun-ds Lyman have closed their home 
in Burlingame and have gone South to pass the month of Au- 
gust with Mrs. Lyman's mother, Mrs. Leigh Sypher, at the 
Sypher country home, "Las Palmas," in Montecito. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

55 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 35 60 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 4, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



GRESHAM — Dean and Mrs. J. Wilmer Gresham have returned 
from a few weeks' vacation passed in the Canadian Rockies 
and are at home at the Deanery in the Cathedral Close. 

SPRECKELS — Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels. accompanied hy her 
daughter Miss Eleanor Spreckels, and Miss Edith Grant, has 
motored south and is a guest at Miramar in Santa Barbara tor 
a week or so. Miss Grant and Miss Spreckels are among 
the most popular debutantes in Burlingame society. 

PRICHETT — Wilson Prichett has arrived from Philadelphia and 
is visiting Mrs. Pritchett and Mrs. Sydney A. Cloman at the 
Cloman home in Burlingame. 

FARNHAM — Mrs. Sylvanus Farnham and her sister. Miss Elsie 
Clifford, returned to their home in this city on Monday after 
a week-end visit at Menlo Park, where they were the guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. John Polhemus. 

LITTLE: — Mr. and Mrs. William H. Little and their sons-in-law 
and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Hills and Mr. and Mrs. 
Reed Funsten, who have been passing the early summer 
months at the Littles' summer home at Los Altos, returned to 
town on Sunday. 

BOWLES — Mrs. George Bowles and Mrs. Ernest Heebner have 
gone to Barlett Springs for a fortnight's stay. Mr. and Mrs. 
Bowles and their children spent the early part of the summer 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Leroy Nickel at Menlo 
Park. 

FRISSELL — Lieutenant Duncan Frissell, U. S. A., has arrived 
from Honolulu and joined Mrs. Frissell and their little son 
at the home of Mrs. Frissell's parents, Dr. and Mrs. Langley 
Porter. They will return to their post in Honolulu in a few 
weeks. 

ADAMS — Miss Julia Adams spent the week-end in Marin county, 
where she was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Dibblee 
in San Rafael. 

SCHWAN — Mrs. Louise Schwan of New York has arrived in Cali- 
fornia and has joined her sister, Miss Ella Deming, in Pa- 
cific Grove. Mrs. Schwan was Miss Mary Deming of San Fran- 
cisco and is a sister of Mrs. Lewis Hobart and a cousin of 
Mrs. William H. Crocker. 

SIMPSON — Admiral and Mrs. Edward Simpson have returned 
from the East and North and are at the Fairmont. They went 
East soon after their arrival from Honolulu. Admiral Simp- 
son has assumed his duties as commandant of the Twelfth 
Naval District. 

CHAMBERLAIN — Mr. and Mrs. Selah Chamberlain have arrived 
at their home here after spending the last month at Santa 
Barbara as the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. Clinton B. Hale. 

OVERTON — Mrs. Charles P. Overton entertained as house guest 
over Saturday and Sunday at Menlo Park, where she is pass- 
ing the summer. Mrs. Charles G. Lyman, Mrs. Frederick Pick- 
ering and Mrs. Milton Bugbee. 

LIGGETT — General and Mrs. Hunter Liggett, who have been 
south, are again at their home in town. 

BRADLEY — The Frederick W. Bradleys are passing the months 
of July and August at their country place at Alta, in Placer 
county. They have with them as their house guests Judge 
and Mrs. John F. Davis, with the Misses Ruth and Mary 
Davis. All will return to town on the first of September. 

de LIMUR — Count Jean de Litnur came North from Hollywood 
to attend the Midsummer Jinks at the Bohemian Grove, on the 
Russian River. 

INTIMATIONS 

GUESTS RETURNING — With the return of many Hotel Riche- 
lieu guests from summer vacations entertaining is going on 
quite extensively. Dinner parties, luncheons, cards ami mail 
jongg being the form of enjoyment. Of the many lovely af- 
fairs. Mrs. Hal Goldman's bridge tor fifteen ladies on Wed- 
nesday was notable. Of the dinners, that gives by Mrs A 
Levy was also of note. Of the banquets the most elaborate 
was the birthday dinner for thirty-five friends and relatives 
given by Mrs. Susie Lurie in honor of her son. Leonard 
Lurie. Mr. Lurie. who is at the University of California study- 
ing law, celebrated his twenty-first birthday on Sunday. Mr. 
and Mrs. ('has. Heller have returned to their apartmer 
the Hotel Richelieu after a two weeks' trip to the Vosennte 
and Byron Springs. 

I'ARROTT — Following a short visit at his home in San Mateo. 
Mr. Stephen Parrotl will return August 7 to New York and 
will sail for Europe the middle of the month. Mr. Parrott 
will go at once to Paris to he there for the autumn opening 
of the Les Beaux Arts, which he has been attending for the 
past year and where he is making a distinguished record. 
\iiss Barbara Parrott. who accompanied her brother to the 
United States, will remain at •Haywood'' with Miss Emilie 
and Mr John Parrott until some time in October. 




AGNES KERR CRAWFORD 



EDWARD BELASCO head of the Belasco Production of this 
city, and A. H. Sebastian, production manager of the or- 
ganization, are in Los Angeles making preparations for the 
filming" of their next picture. They will work in one of the South- 
ern studios, and their full plans will be given out in the near 
future. 

Cecil DeMille and the company "The Ten Commandments" un- 
der his direction, put in four days of strenuous work in San Fran- 
cisco last week. They were making part of the modern sequence 
of the picture (really part of the Seventh Commandment), and 
the story called for the use of a great Cathedral Church, partly 
built, for its scene, so their location manager found the big 
Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, now in progress of construc- 
tion on Washington Square, simply ideal for their purpose. Also 
as the church has not yet been dedicated it was possible to ob- 
tain the privilege of using it for picture making. Some of the 
scenes were shot on the ground, and a few in the interior of the 
building, but two whole days work was done on the very highest 
of the scaffolding between the steeples. It was a very dizzy job 
riding up and down, hundreds of feet in the air, on the eleva- 
tors built only to carry materials to the top, and which were 
only rough platforms with no sides, and even after they got up 
they had to work in very limited space, most of the time a bitter 
cold wind blowing so strong that you could lean on it. But in 
spite of difficulties DeMille almost made a record, shooting as 
high as twenty-one scenes a day, which is doing well in a studio. 
In all. the cast and staff numbered some forty-five people, and 
included such famous names on the screen, besides DeMille him- 
self, as Jeanie McPherson, who wrote the continuity, and of the 
stars, Richard Dix, Robert Edeson, Rod LaRoque (who by the way 
is one of the handsomest young sheiks of the screen), Nita Naldi, 
Leatrice Joy, James Neill, and others. 

Eric Von Stroheim and the cast making "Greed" under his 
direction have just about finished the San Francisco part of the 
picture. They have been here so long that they quite feel like 
old residents: Ernie Trailer, their production manager, having 
come to town in December, is even entitled to a vote now, the 
actual filming of the picture having been in operation for four 
months and a half. They expect to leave here this week, and 
their original plans having been slightly changecj. they will go 
from here to Los Angeles, to remain there only a few hours, then 
with some special equipment they go on to Keeler. After shoot- 
ing a short sequence there, they brave the terrible heat of the 
desert in Death Valley, to shoot what are the last scenes in the 
story. Having finished there, Gibson (lowland, who plays "Mc- 
Teague," can shave the beard that he has raised for the last 
pari 01 the Story, and the company will go to Colfax to make 
,i the Great Dipper Gold Mine the early sequences when 
McTeague is a young chap working in the mine. The picture will 
pleted -arly in September, and will be released in the fall, 
it is to so great a degree San Francisco's own picture its 
first showing here will he awaited with great interest. 
*■ * * 

Louis Graf, president of the Graf Productions, returned from 
I. os Angeles last Friday, and he and Hesser Walraver, the busi- 
ness manager of the organization, are hard at work lining up a 
four masted schooner to he used in their next picture, which 
they will start to shoot the middle of August. The company will 
go to *;i to work on the schooner for two weeks, and also quite 
a number of scenes will be shot with it tied up to the wharf. 
Max Graf is still in the South signing his director and cast, which 
will be an all-star one. 

* * * 

Hal Reed, well known publicity man. and former press agent 
for First National Productions in San Francisco, has been ap- 
pointed director of publicity for "If Winter Comes." latest pic- 
ture of the Fox Film Corporation. He will also handle Warner 
llrothers' publicity in San Francisco. 

* * * 

Milton Gardner, vice president of (loldwyn. came to San Fran- 
isco last Friday to look over (he last days of the filming of 
Greed." the work on which in this section is almost completed. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 




down sham. Bragging has created civic pride 
and civic unity of endeavor. So, keep right 
on with the good boast, based upon truth. 



By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money — VI. 

FOR weeks the big printing presses of 
Germany have been groaning out aloud 
in the production of really cheap money — 
probably the cheapest money ever turned 
out by any government. 



Money in the Gutters 

A thousand mark note last week was worth 
so very little, less than a fraction of a cent, 
that no beggar would lift it out of a gutter. 
In the banks the tellers move money from 
vaults to the paying windows in trucks. Lofts 
and ordinary warehouses were used to store 
the almost worthless paper trillions. And 
people went wild. The usually placid Ger- 
man has at last come to have a glimmering 
of an understanding of the fact that money 
has no value at all unless it is based on 
something valuable and of a nature which 
fluctuates little or not at all. 



The Paper Mark 

The German paper mark has outrun the 
Russian rouble in its race toward valueless- 
ness. It has turned valueless in buying power 
so rapidly lately that it has actually found 
in this the power to impress the lethargic 
mind of the German populace with that fact. 



It is Necessary to Understand 

It is necessary to remember that what is 
happening in Germany, although the situa- 
tion is a little out of hand, was premeditated 
by the German leaders in business and fi- 
nance and in the government. Germany is 
an exporting nation. It was necessary to re- 
establish Germany as such after the war. 
So, the great chieftains thought out the 
scheme of paying Hans and Gretchen with 
worthless marks and taking the pay from 
the foreigner for Hans' and Gretchen's prod- 
ucts in gold. So we have two mediums in 
Germany, the paper mark for the poor and 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 



a gold mark for the rich. The gold, the 
Stinnes and their ilk collect from Argentina, 
England, Holland, China, Japan and all the 
civilized world, is never banked in Germany. 
No, — that would not be safe. It is placed 
in the vaults of French, Swiss and English 
banks, where it may be held SAFELY until 
called for, in case of a revolution staged by 
Hans and Gretchen. When Germany went 
into the business of posing as a professional 
bankrupt it did so without any idea of crip- 
pling its big capitalists and so it evolved a 
scheme that would make the poor poorer 
and the rich richer. 



Cheap Money Is Always Cheap 

It does not make any difference whether 
cheap money is printed by Germany or by 
Russia, and in modern times, cheap money 
is always cheap, and that was true in the 
times of John Law and in the times of the 
great Argentinian money debacle. Next week 
I will give other instances. 



To Brag or Not to Brag 

Bragging about the things you really pos- 
sess, the virtues you may be endowed with, 
the beauties adorning your person, the qual- 
ity of your products, the diversity of rea- 
sons why your locality should have the pref- 
erence over all others and any other old 
thing you may be blessed with, is permis- 
sible, and it is even admirable to so boast, 
PROVIDING that which you boast about 
is the truth and nothing but the truth. 

San Francisco As a Leader 

We, who live here and have our eyes open 
and are given sufficient development to en- 
able us to make comparisons, know that 
San Francisco, of all of the cities of this 
coast, leads in every direction. We know 
we are first in finance; we always have lead 
in matters of money, and we will continue to 
lead. We know that we lead in shipping, 
and that our export and import business is 
larger than that of any port bordering the 
American Pacific. And, now, we are coming 
to know we are leading in an industrial sense, 
not only in San Francisco but by a large 
percentage in all the Metropolitan Bay Dis- 
trict. 



You Are Justified in Boasting 

Call it bragging, if you like, call it any- 
thing you may please, do not stop brag- 
ging, but be sure you make good on the 
brag. Bragging has built cities and torn 



We Need Factories 

We need more factories and we can ac- 
commodate a great many. And, while you 
are bragging, do not forget to add that we 
are welcoming those who create the full din- 
ner pail. San Francisco's climate is ideal, 
the cities of the Bay District are ideally sit- 
uated, and no other port has such splendid 
facilities where rail and water meet. The 
back country is pouring its products down 
to us for the use of a growing industrial pop- 
ulation and for distribution to the world at 
large. Let us change more of the raw ma- 
terial into the finished product and let us 
get to work doing this on the largest scale 
of output possible, — the world's markets are 
ours. 



A Wave of Prosperity 

San Francisco at the present time is en- 
joying a wave of prosperity and business is 
improving all the time. New factories are 
being established at the rate of five a day. 
The average for the state is ten a day. The 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Peck Judah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



August 4, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 







JAN FRANCISCO 



65c 

Luncheon 



Good food, quiet pleasant 
surroundings and carefu 1 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 



Boyes Hot Springs 

4 5 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. W. P. R . R. 

Beautiful New Golf Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths, Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools, Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. LICHTENBERG, Boyes Springs, 

Or Peck-Judah, 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TYPEWRITERS 

Guaranteed Factory Rebuilt 

AH Makes S8>»"™> 

^ w REPAIRED 

See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 

AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

R06 Market St., San Fran. Phone Doug. 649 
308 12th St.. Oakland Phono Oakland 2764 



Good Bats Reasonable Prices 

A la Caii.> Service al All Hours 

Special Attention to Week-end 

Parties 

WOODRUFF INN 

MODERN 

— Under New Management — 
1,\ HONDA ROAD 

Between Woodside and La Honda 

Stage From Redwood City Passes 

Door 

Phono Redwood 1:11 F 1-2 



aggregate salary to be paid in San Fran- 
cisco for the year has, up to this time, been 
increased by five millions of dollars over last 
year. People in the East are looking toward 
California as the Land of Contentment and 
the trend is steadily and increasingly set in 
our direction. Spread the good news. 

Stabilizing Prices 

Nations and states have in the past tried 
in vain to stabilize prices of commodities by 
warehousing plenteous products and selling 
the same in the lean years of production. 
This system has been productive of an ap- 
parent prosperity for the planter but it has 
rarely, if ever, been a blessing to the rest 
of the nation. Anything like government help 
to any particular industry nearly always has 
meant a loss to the people in general and 
particularly a loss to the government prac- 
ticing such a false system of political econ- 
omy. Congress has frowned down and kicked 
out the proposition that it give wheat a sta- 
bilized price by purchase and storage. If 
this should be done for the wheat grower, 
why not for the planter of sugar, tobacco, 
the manufacturer of wool and cotton, or for 
any other raw commodity producer or for 
any particular manufacturer? If we are go- 
ing to go in for a form of sovietization, why 
not go the whole thing, as in Russia, for ex- 
ample? 



The Bucket Shops 

The New York Stock Exchange is cred- 
ited with the praise because of the present 
drive against the bucket shops. It is unde- 
niably true that the bucket shops should be 
closed, and that they never should be al- 
lowed to come into activity again. They ruin 
the small investor and they are a menace 
to all. It is not likely the drive against the 
bucketeers is going to stop very soon and 
we may depend on a great deal of good 
being accomplished before the war does come 
to an end. Some of the big and hitherto 
respectable bond and stock "brokers" may 
be caught, as assistants to the bucketeers. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



An Exclusive Radio Store 

Authorized Dealers for All Standard 
Radio Equipment 

Service, Help on Construction, 
Diagrams 

Manufacturing Repairing Installation 

We are as Close to Yon As Your 
Phone 

MILLER-TAYLOR RADIO CO. 

C E. MILLER H. M. TAYLOR 

1403 Bush St. Calif. 

(at Polk 1 1 me Prospect 6575 



The Rates Are 
Reasonable 

at this 

Delightful 
Hotel 

DAILY 

One person, room with 

bath $3.50 

Two persons, room with 

bath $5.00 

One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY RATES 

I Ine person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $21.00 

Monthly rates are figured at 24 
days to the month. 

^^^^^ ff^ Bathing, tennis, 

„ j golf, fishing, 

Cvi dancing, b o a t- 

<7!w/.=,. ing ' European 

Better ]ilan — dining 

cpi^ra room in connec- 

riace { „, n come by 

to Gn" State Highway 

'" U0 or S. P. Open the 

^^m^^hhm year round. 

CASA 

DEL RETT 



Agua Caliente Springs 



The Fireproof Hotel in 
the Valley of the Moon 

Private baths, Swimming pool, filled 
daily with hot sulphur water. No chem- 
icals used in this water. Golt course 
close to hotel. My motto — service, 
cleanliness and the best of table. If 
you want health and rest this is the 
place. Make reservation early. Address 
T. H. Corcoran, Prop., Agua Caliente, 
Sonoma Co. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In S:m Francisco 

65 Tost Street, Near Market Street 

I'lion* Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
91.25 

Me«U Serred * 1* Carte. Alma KejuUr 
Frrnrli and Italian Dinner* 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 



LEISURE'S WW 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

lorn Moore, 



Capitol Theater 

The audiences that gather in crowds this 
week to see and hear Marjorie Rambeau and 
her company of players at the Capitol Thea- 
ter willingly go with her into the Valley of 
Content and come out of it more highly 
pleased than have most people who go to see 
and hear the spoken show. To Blanche Up- 
right goes the praise of all for having writ- 
ten a play that holds the interest to the very 
end — and that end is one of the most charm- 
ing bits ever portrayed by any artist. Miss 
Rambeau was greeted at the first night with 
an audience that crowded the house and her 
acting was simply superb. The audience was 
prepared for the treat, however, and showed 
its appreciation by banking the stage with 
flower offering after flower offering. Miss 
Rambeau made a most felicitous little speech 
and was quite evidently overcome by emo- 
tion. She called Miss Upright to face an 
enthusiastic audience and the applause for 
these two women and for the whole com- 
pany was uproariously generous. 

The company — what shall be said? It was 
uniformly good and the playing of Richard 
Tucker, as usual, left little or nothing to be 
desired. The stage was most appropriately 
set for each scene and this added to the 
pleasure of the play. 

It may be said that Miss Rambeau and her 
capable support have captured San Fran- 
cisco by storm and it is rarely indeed that 
the theatergoers of this city have given so 
strong a testimonial of their liking for con- 
scientious and beautifully artistic work as 
they have in the case of Marjorie Rambeau 
and company. 



Orpheum's Orgy of Fun 

Sophie Tucker's come to town! With a 
personality that would win her a place any- 
where at any time, this delightful comedy 




*,. ww ., ^ <S\yiWi^&\nu]rX T " 



The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 



MATINEE DAILY 



actress has a sense of humor that wears well, 
and a selection of songs that are new and 
sure-fire hits. Ted Shapiro and Jack Carroll 
give her worthy support; the perfect under- 
standing existing among the trio is a big 
impetus in putting this clever act over. The 
20th Century Revue is Billy Sharpe's am- 
bitious offering of song and dance and amus- 
ing patter, and the pretty Darling Sisters, 
singers, with Marionne, dancer, contribute 
a large share of talent to the piece. Jack 
Clifford is an entertaining monologist of 
originality. Lemaire and Phillips do a tre- 
mendous lot of heavy comedy work, but 
their kind of fun is less spontaneous and 
spirited than any other on the program. In 
contrast, there comes Frank De Voe, a de- 
lightful chap whose songs are accompanied 
on the piano by Eddie Willis. "The Watch 
King" is Gus Fowler's proud title, and cer- 
tainly he is a very monarch of mystery in 
the matter of playing tricks with all kinds 
of timepieces. 



Portola 

If Norma Talmadge is to be seen in San 
Francisco, — just look for me in that same 
place. An actress of wholesome charm, fresh 
sweet expressiveness, deep emotional fervor 
and just enough variety to make her the 
spiciest of screen beauties. In the current 
play at the Portola, "The Law of Compen- 
sation," Miss Talmadge has two parts, and 
she has never been seen to better advantage 
than as the young wife and the older moth- 
er. With her, all well cast, are Mary Hall, 
Sally Crute, John Charles and Chester Bar- 
nett. The plot is splendidly carried through, 
holding the interest without a lapse. 



the classic features in the world avail naught. 
Paul Ash and his band create considerable 
excitement. A fighting film follows, and a 
good news reel completes the evening. 



Granada 

In "A Gentleman of Leisure" the reader 
of popular fiction as it comes nowadays, well 
posted, will recognize the ultra-modern touch 
of that smart story-teller, Wodehouse. This 
author has a delightful gift for merriment 
and absurd situations, and Jack Holt, who 
plays the title role, is fitted with a part ad- 
mirably suited to his particular talents. Sigrid 
Holmquist (intriguing name, isn't it?) is a 
handsome girl, with excellent features, good 
teeth, fine eyes, a graceful carriage and one 
feels sure that when she speaks she does so 
in a full, rich voice. Well then, what's the 
matter with Sigrid (like that name) ? Only 
one little, tiny thing is lacking and its lack 
makes all the difference in an actress. This 
nice big, goodlooking young girl has no 
charm. Not a bit of the elusive quality we 
call personal magnetism. And without it, all 



Tivoli 

Robert Chambers has been writing "thrill- 
ers" for a matter of a quarter of a century 
and that this typical creation of his, "The 
Common Law," should find its way to the 
screen is as inevitable as the course of the 
stream to the sea. It makes a good motion 
picture. The cast is an exceptional one, 
showing the importance of the production in 
the minds of the makers. Corinne Griffith 
has one of the big parts of her youthful ca- 
reer and gives a creditable performance. El- 
liott Dexter, Conway Tearle, Hobart Bos- 
worth and Wally Van are all suitably cast, 
each achieving marked success in his part. 
Phyllis Haver and Doris May also have in- 
teresting roles. Certainly a better company 
could not be asked for than this notable 
aggregation. The play presents a problem, — 
not a genuine problem, but the kind that 
are built up for the purpose of writing a 
drama around. Chambers' famous power to 
entertain, however, quite outweighs his want 
of logic, and all gaps caused by discrepen- 
cies in reasoning are easily filled up with 
diverting bits of amusement. 




California 

"Broadway Gold" is scattered about lav- 
ishly this week at the California. That some 
of it is dross seems only to be expected, but 
the intrinsic worth of the production is high, 
taken altogether. When you learn that 
Elaine Hammerstein has the leading part you 
will straightway surmise that there are lots 



V.J 



Hotel Oakland 

abounds in a wealth of 
social activity. As a 
place to entertain, 
whether your guests 
number one, two or 
many, it is THE ideal 
place. 

Dancing Wednesday 
and Saturday evenings. 
Dinner dances every 
Saturday. 




August 4, 1923 

of exciting situations. You are right. There 
are. Elliott Dexter makes a good opposite 
for Miss Hammerstein, with his calm and 
dignified presence and his quiet effective- 
ness. 

Easter and Hazelton call their dance cre- 
ation of the week "The Broadway Whirl- 
wind," and give a charming performance. 
The California orchestra is beginning to do 
better work under the direction of Setaro, 
whose methods are not always in keeping 
with musical traditions. A violinist of re- 
markable ability is Mischa Olin and his se- 
lections are well received. 



Warfield Theater 

San Francisco's favorite matinee idol, 
Bert Lytell, is star of "The Meanest Man In 
the World," produced for the screen by Sol 
Lesser from the George M. Cohan play of 
the same name, which will be given its world 
premier at the Warfield Theater during the 
week commencing August 4. It is said to 
be chock full of American humor in assort- 
ment with other elements of successful com- 
edy drama. This date also marks the acqui- 
sition by the Warfield of Herbert Wiedoeft's 
Cinderella Roof Orchestra, reputed to be one 
of the best syncopation organizations on the 
Pacific Coast, which will give a season of 
jazz. Another addition to the program for 
this week is Jue Fong, Chinese tenor, a stu- 
dent of several American universities. 

In "The Meanest Man In the World," Bert 
Lytell is seen as a soft hearted, unbusiness- 
like young lawyer, who wins the effections 
of everyone in his futile attempt to be the 
world's meanest man. Blanche Sweet, as the 
sympathetic heroine; Bryant Washburn, 
Maryon Aye, Helen Lynch and Lincoln Sted- 
man, likewise paired off in affairs of the 
heart; Ward Crane, Frances Raymond, Carl 
Stockdale, Forrest Robinson, Robert Dun- 
bar, Victor Potel, William Conklin and Tom 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 

GRILL. 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERCKZ PRANK'S 

OLD POODLE 1mm;, 

415-4?: Bush si . 

Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.35 French Dinner 
Served Dally Except 

Sunday From r» p. in. 

to 9 p. in. 

AImi A La (arte 



ielands 




AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Murray complete the list of members of trie 
cast. Lipschultz and the Warfield Music 
Masters in concert, and the usual supple-^ 
mentary attractions are scheduled. 



17 



Many Thrills 
And Near Spills— 

Are portrayed in 
"Aquaplaning on San 
Francisco Bay," a de- 
lightfully attract ive 
page in next Sunday's 
Rotagravure section of 
The Chronicle. Lovers 
of nature will find a 
pictorial feast, in the 
half dozen reproduc- 
tions of California's 
scenic beauties. "Fash- 
ions for the Beach," 
might well be called 

Don't Go Near 
The Water— 

But they will surely at- 
tract the feminine eye, 
and — maybe the eye 
masculine. "Abroad" 
acquaints you with the 
European notables, 
while "North, South, 
East and West" shows 
Americans who have 
achieved prominence. 
In fact you will find 
all the news of the 
world, pictured in per- 
fect photography, to- 
morrow, in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Goucb 

Telephone Park 271 



smmms 



"Horrors! While mother was sleeping the 
baby licked all the paint" — 
"Off a toy?" 
"No; off mother." 



An old lady was getting into a car one 
day and finding it a somewhat difficult task, 
she turned to the driver with the request, 
"Help me in, my good man, for I am very 
old." "Begorra, ma'am," was Pat's gallant 
reply, "no matter what age you are, you 
don't look it." 

A man had been patiently fishing all day, 
but had caught nothing. On his way home he 
went into a fish dealers shop and said to the 
man, "Just stand over there and throw me 
five of the biggest of these trout." "Throw 
em!" said the man in astonishment. "What- 
ever for?" "Well," replied the customer, "I 
may want to tell me wife I caught 'em. I 
may be a poor fisherman, but I'm no liar." 



Jill — I was at a psychological lecture last 
night and the speaker talked a lot about 
auto-suggestion. Do you know what that 
is. Jack? 

Jack — I surely do! That is when a fel- 
low calls on a girl, and she speaks of what 
a wonderful night it would be for a ride. — 
Cornell Widow. 



A station master was suddenly alarmed 
by hearing a terrific crash on the platform. 
Rushing out of his ofhce, he was just in 
time to see a train disappearing around the 
curve, while among a number of overturned 
cream cans at the extreme end of the plat- 
form there sprawled a hatless and disheveled 
young man. 

"What's the matter? Was he trying to 
catch the train?" asked the bewildered sta- 
tion master of a small boy standing near. 

"He did catch it," exclaimed the boy, "but 
it got away again." — Forbes Magazine. 



WALNUT 
ORCHARD 

For Sale 
26 ACRES 

1000 Franquette and Mayette Walnuts 
9 years old 

6 miles from San Jose 

$750 Per Acre 

Address, P. M., Owner 
382 Russ Building, San Francisco 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 4, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palnce Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rules, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 

FREE 

In a high class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboire & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 5 00 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 5S0 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllnrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodnld© 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folaom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 010 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 




nitric acid should be poured in the hole and 
allowed to stand for a few hours. 



Spare the Brakes 

The greatest fault with American drivers 
today is that they drive with their brakes. 
So says an authority on motor matters. 

It may be due to the fact that life in 
America is speeded up to a dizzying pace that 
our great cities are congested with automo- 
bile traffic; and that the brakes are actually 
built so mechanically sound that even in 
spite of ihe abuse they are subjected to they 
stand up under the strain. 

Every time you hear a traffic officer's 
whistle in a large city, you almost imme- 
diately hear a crunching of brakes and scrap- 
ing of dry tires on the pavement. 

And even in long cross-country drives, 
where hilly country is encountered, some 
drivers constantly jam on their brakes when 
slowing down instead of allowing their cars 
to slow down before the brakes are applied. 
Every tire mark on the pavement costs some 
autemobilist money, sooner or later. 

The motorist should take things easy in 
driving, whether in a crowd or out of a 
crowd. Fast driving between short city 
blocks, followed by a sudden jamming on 
of the brakes, gains little time and is ex- 
pensive, both in the wear and tear on the 
tires, the burning out of the brake lining, 
and injury to the brakes and other mechani- 
cal parts of the car. Never put more pres- 
sure on the brakes than is absolutely neces- 
sary to stop at the point you wish. 

In going down hill, take your foot off the 
accelerator, and the motor, set at a safe 
pace, will hold the car back. If the grade 
is very steep, shift to second or first speed 
as the grade may require before starting. 

Under no circumstances is it advisable to 
throw out the clutch when actually driving 
down hill. To do so may mean absolute 
loss of control. It is not good driving, either, 
to shut off the spark completely. It is a safe 
practice to have the motor running in order 
to have power on tap in case of emergency. 



Removing a Broken Tap 

Usually, when a tap breaks, it is difficult 
to remove, as it breaks off flush with the 
surface of the work, or it splinters in the hole 
causing it to wedge. In the first case, a good 
method of removal is to build up the broken 
shank of the tap to above the surface of 
the work, using a welding torch and filler 
rod. A small size welding tip must be used, 
and care must be taken not to deposit any 
metal between the tap and the hole. The 
work must be done as quickly as possible 
so that the tap will not be heated sufficiently 
to cause the threads to fuse to the work. 
After the shank of the tap has been built 
up sufficiently, it may be turned with a pair 
of pliers or pipe wrench. 

If the tap is splintered in the hole, some 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. . A 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation Is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1650 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



M-10 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3085 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

.MHiil Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy- Acetylene Wi-ldlnc — lilacktjinltliing- 

II. IF. Culver M. Dnuerer 1£. Johnson 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

P> 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



NOTICE OF PUBMC SALE OF PER- 
SONAL PROPERTY 

Under Section*) 1861, 18tila and 1862, Civil Code 
of the State of California 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

Notice is hereby given that on Friday, 
August 10, 1923, at the hour of 12 o'clock 
M. of said day, in the baggage room of 
the premises of what is known as the Clift 
Hotel, situate at the South East corner of 
Geary and Taylor Streets in the City and 
County of San Francisco, State of Cali- 
fornia, the undersigned will sell at public 
auction, for cash in Gold Coin of the Unit- 
ed States, the following described personal 
property: 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 40 inches high, in- 
itialed A. JO. J. 

1 Wardrobe trunk (black) 44 inches high, 

1 Hat trunk (black) 26 inches high, initialed 
A. E. J. 

Contents of above trunks wearing apparel. 

1 Wooden box containing books. 

1 Large package containing articles of wear- 
ing apparel. 

7 Hat boxes containing hats. 

1 Suit box containing clothing. 

1 Shoe box containing shoes. 

1 Shoe box containing empty boxes. 

l Gentleman's hat box containing various ar- 
ticles. 

1 Flower basket, 
being t lie property of Mrs. Carrie B. Johnston. 
Sacramento, California. The said auction and 
sale will be made under a nd by virtue of the 
provisions of Sections 1861, L861a and 1863 of 
the Civil Code of the State of California for the 

purpose Of satisfying the lieu of the under- 
signed on said persona] property in the sum of 
$710.15, together with the coats of satd sale, 
said lien being an innkeeper's lien Cor the proper 
charges due from said Carrie It. Johnston for 

her ace nodation, board and lodging and room 

rent, and for such extras as were furnished to 
her at her requesl and for moneys paid out for 
and :uh anced to her. 

Dated San Francisco. California. .Tune 32, 1923. 

CLIFT HOTEL CO., 

By Frederick C. Clift. 

President and Managing Din 

\l BERT I. LOEB, Attorney at Law. 

202-203 Crocker, Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 

EYE, EAB, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to G — By Appointment — 

Saturday L0 to 1 Phone Sutter 4662 

Kemo\et1 to Suite 537 Uebes Bldr. 

117 TOST STREET 

San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit* rre»»ed by Hand. Only — 
Suit* Cnllnl for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian nyelne and cleanlnr 
«S3 Mason SI. Phone Franklin 2510 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL, DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
466 Geary Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing: manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1174 Phelnn Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurar.re Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Phone Kearny 391 San Franciaco 




orchestral 

RoseRoom 
Bowl 

Sparkling, up-to-date dance 

music. Orchestra under the 

direction of 

E.MAX BEAD FIELD 

Dinner dances every eve- 
ning, except Sunday, from 
seven to one. No cover 
charge except Saturday. 
Cover charge Saturday eve- 
ning 50 cents. 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

dManaeement 

HALSEV E . MAMWARJNG 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Suiter 695 Douglas 4778 

Perpetual Care Fund 

On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems Decenary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1865 
3T-45 First Street - - San Franclaes 



fl 



The Keaton Scientific Non-Skid 

Original Depression Typo Protected by l T . S. Patents 

New Broad - Flattened Tread 






\n. 1. — T RACTION. Scoop- 
shaped wall formed by 55° angle 
wide groove* and connecting: 
crown groove. This scoop-shaped 
h ill with square edge 
extends aeroHH the en- 
tire width ni the tread 
nnd forms the strong- 
est possible grip. 




No. 2. — CENTRAL GROOVE. 

Straight, square edges at 
right angle to road 
surface hold the car 
in a true course and 
effectively check any 
tendency to side slip. 



No, 3. — Side grooves, 
placed at 55 c angle 
to center 
groove make 
side skidding 
practically Im- 
possible. 







The Most Powerful Non-Skid Ever Devised 

Note the massive construction of the Keaton Non-Skid tread which insures long mileage. Observe the 
long unbroken gripping edges with perpendicular walls, scientifically arranged in the proper inter- 
relation and at the most effective angle. These are the principles of the Keaton Non-Skid and the 
reason for its powerful resistance against skidding and sliding. There is no hindrance to the tire 
rolling freely. 

KEATON TIRE & RUBBER CO. 

636 Van Ness Ave., Phone Prospect 324 

San Francisco Sales and Service Agencies 
Behrmahn Elm and Tire Co., 618 Golden Gate Ave. Mission Vulcanizing Work! 

The Tire Exchange, 608 Golden Gate Ave 

»e Luxe Garage, Hyde and Post Sts. i? , ,, M ■ uU . n( . ill g 



399 Valencia St. 
Regan Tire Company, 0K8 Turk St. 
Service Vulcanising VVorkH, 540 Van N*ens Ave. 
Acme Auto Supply, 8!) 1 
Black & White Tire Company, 4811 Geary St. 



Geo. S. Merwin Company, 1946 Polk St. 

Northern California Sales and Service Agencies 

Oakland Rim & Tire Co., Oakland (2811 Broadway). Marshall Tire and Battery Service, Modesto. 

(In-.- A Garage, Stockton. ,. ._ ,...,. ™ t ... — - , 

El Monte (iar.ee, Or,,,.,. Marshall , Tire Shop, Petalnma. 

A. I.. Kriekson, Los ftatos. Kenton Tire nnd Kim Agency, Reno, Nevada. 

George Marks, Fresno (2009 S. Broadway). .Sweet Service Company, Hollister, Monterey, Salinas, 

Kister & Mitehell, Orovllle (At the "Y") Santa Cm/.. Watsonvllle, Gllroy. 



m 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



■ 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 



IlllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllW 




VV^^M 



"Go Forth Under The Open Sky. and List To Nature's Teachings."— Bryant. 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



WALTER W. DERR 

,105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (434) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable, can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be sent you on request. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

SI 7-1 S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 
Two Wall 
street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

F»ld Up Capital f 15,000,000 $15,000,000 Elinrve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 





N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 

—NOTICE— 

Breakfast — Dinner — and — Lunch 
Served 

at the 

CLUB GRILL AND RESTAURANT 

132 Montgomery St., between 
Sutter and BuhIi Sts. 

Special Dinner on 
Sundays, $1.00 

Food excels as to quality and preparation. 

Beautiful and Spacious Dining Room 

Prices Reasonable 

You are bound to be pleased when you 

cot at THE CLUB GRILL, 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays.. 91.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 

151 Powell Street 




established Jul/ ML 1U6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




vol. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 1 1. 1923 



No. 6 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— A woman at Deauville, France, creates a riot because she dons 
a "transparent bathing suit." And we wonder: "Why the bathing 
suit?" 

— The publicity man at the Curran Theater wouldn't give us 
tickets this week, so we won't review those immortal lovers — 
"Romeo and Juliet." Wasn't he mean? 

— We know a woman whose features and expression make one 
think of a Burne-Jones picture, and she has a fund of risque stories 
that are appalling. You never can tell! 

* * # 

— "An ill wind is sure to blow men into congress who never could 
have landed there in calm weather," says the Toledo Blade. Wat 
this prophetic? For it was written prior to the event which draped 
the Nation in mourning. 

* * * 

— Old Glory fluttering along Market street; an avenue of gay 
streamers anticipating the arrival of a national notable; and then 
suddenly the red, white and blue is changed to sombre black; and 
we remember Gray's lines: "The paths of glory lead but to the 

grave." 

* * * 

— The other day on a ferry boat we saw a girl with a real face, 
so real that it startled us; she had a lovely clear white skin, with 
pink lips, gray eyes, and hair the color of "ripe corn," and she 
looked like a lovely lily beside the made-up, clownish countenances 
of her contemporaries. 

* * * 

— The increasing popularity of furs in the United States is shown 
by records compiled for the National City Bank of New York. Dur- 
ing the fiscal year just ended, nearly $100,000,000 worth of 
furs were imported, as against the $25,000,000 of former years. 
About 10 per cent of this sum was paid for "Summer" furs. 

* * * 

—Sometimes, on moonlight nights, on Russian Hill, the call of 
an owl flying over the cottage roof, comes faintly to our ears; 
or the plaint of a tern, when the fog is rolling in from the sea; and a 
great longing comes over us to find some spot out in the wilds 
somewhere, and to sleep again in the open spaces, out under die 
brooding stars. 



— We have an American composer in the person of Edgar Still- 
man Kelley, who has been traveling in England to arrange the de- 
tails of the forthcoming premier of his "Pilgrim's Progress." Mr. 
Kelley is the composer of several operas, but not being the pos- 
sessor of some name sounding like a sneeze, we do not suppose 
he will ever be really appreciated. 

— Arrant laziness must be responsible for the lack of gardens or 
window boxes in San Francisco. Flowers flourish here with very 
little care, as can be seen by the few blossoming spots that the 
downtown and apartment house districts can boast of, while fam- 
ilies in the residential section, who have given a little time and 
trouble to planting, are rewarded by masses of blooms. Even a 
small window box can bring hours of pleasure, and is something 
that the poorest can afford. 

— People who come from the Atlantic coast are surprised to 
see the little use that is made of our beach. They say that on the 
Atlantic such a site would be thronged with expensive hotels and 
apartment houses, that the site is superb and the view hardly 
surpassable. We have nothing but a few sheds and cheap amuse- 
ment places, most of them dirty and repulsive. What is the rea- 
son? It can hardly be distance in these days of cars. For the 
beach is hardly farther nowadays than the old Phelan place at 
Seventeenth and Valencia used to be. 

* * * 

— Unnecessary noises should be prohibited by law. Terrifying 
auto horns, fog sirens that can be heard several miles out to sea 
(why should they carry so far, when the danger entailed can only 
be an immediate one?) the startling ringing up of fares on our 
cable lines, lamp lighters, who, in the early hours of the morning, 
take a delight in banging the pavements with their poles, piano 
playing late at night: all these disagreeable things could be regu- 
lated by a Commission appointed for the purpose of investigating 
senseless sounds. 

* * * 

— After all the talk and accusations of tale, the news that the 
Coast Tire and Rubber Company is solvent comes with quite a re- 
freshing assurance. To listen to the talk in the street, only some 
of which leaked over into the papers — for, after all, papers are 
not as malicious as they might be — it is quite a relief to know 
from Gavin McNab that the company is all right, and well able io 
make its way. Many small investors will feel much encouraged, 
for there was quite a panicky feeling for a while. Something 
should be done to modify the methods of investment, as direct in- 
\estment in enterprises has a worrying effect. If investment com- 
panies could be thoroughly relied upon, and properly supervised, 
they would seem to solve the problem. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 11, 1923 




The demise of President Harding came 
The Death of the President unexpectedly to a community which had 
already begun to felicitate itself upon 
his recovery and which was congratulating itself upon the effects of 
its summer climate as a restorative. The work of the trip, combined 
with the demands on time and patience of one of the most exacting 
offices of modern times, had done its work. The President was unable 
to rally properly from his illnes, his system yielded to the constant 
pounding of an over-driven heart and the end came, painlessly and 
suddenly. 

There is no double as- to the .egard in which the late President 
was held by the people at large. Even those who were not favorable 
to his policies and who took a view of the national problems other 
and different from that of Mr. Harding, had the most affectionate 
regard for his personality, which was indeed charming and almost 
gay. His personal affections were sincere and ardent. He had that 
fove of children and animals which goes so often with men of great 
physique and vigorous bodily strength. He was devoted in his family 
life and gave an example of marital affection which is always greatly 
admired among our people, without which no man, however great, 
can ever attain real respect or real affection among us. 

Indeed, the pictures of the late President, which have been most 
widely circulated and which have had the greatest popular vogue, 
are those which represent him sitting with a child at a baseball game 
or fondling the dog "Laddie," in which animal the nation as a whole 
almost had a proprietary interest, or playing golf, or sitting watching 
the parade, wearing his Shriner's fez, a human touch never attempted 
by any former President and indicative of his genial good humor. 

Politically, his lines were not cast in pleasant or easy places, for 
the waters are still disturbed by the movement of the great conflict. 
The unhealthy and ever-worsening condition of Europe was through- 
out the presidential term a matter of worriment and the late Presi- 
dent, with a gesture of independent conviction, had already begun 
his educational agitation for United States' participation in the 
World Court. This simple and modest contribution to a solution of 
the present tangle was greeted with unholy opposition and actual 
malignity, in the midst of which he died. 

The limitation of naval armaments, the peaceable settlement of 
several great and threatening strikes, the safe crossing of the period 
of deflation, the attainment to a great extent of that "normalcy" for 
which he strove — all these are the achievements of Mr. Harding. May 
he rest in peace. 



The Ruhr question is overshadowing all others in 
The Eternal Ruhr the public interest and while in some respects, 

apparently, on the way to solu'.ion, again appears 
to be as unsolvable as ever. Last week there was a very distinct 
improvement in the situation, and the French reply was anticipated 
to be in accordance with the noted lessening of strain. It was not so, 
however, and there is great dissatisfaction in England over the state 
of affairs. Unfortunately, the whole thing seems to be resolving itself 
into a marshalling of forces behind the great rivals. This week it 
appears that the British have succeeded in obtaining the co-operation 
cf Italy and Spain and the efforts being constantly made to detach 
Belgium frcm its extreme pro-French position seem to be on the way 
at least to partial success. The position of Belgium, however, is such 
that she can not afford to make the slightest move to free herself 



from French control unless she is absolutely guaranteed. This process, 
if continued, will give Britain the upper hand in the long run. But 
the French may get nervous and strike, while they have the great air 
preponderance, and that would be the end. Or they may await the 
almost certain collapse of Germany and then the fighting would ba 
general, with Russia impacting upon the Poles and the whole con- 
tinent on fire. 



Calvin Coolidge, the new President, is like his 
The New President late chief, a country-bred man. He is the son 

of a country storekeeper and has made his way 
to the present position by virtue of ability and hard work and a con- 
centration upon the business of politics, for although he is nominally 
a lawyer he is in reality a politician and has spent his life in political 
activity. He is about fifty-one years old and has a reputation for 
silence, an attribute which is not regarded usually as an asset for a 
politician in a democracy. He seems to be rather an aloof person, 
and not at all given to social gatherings. He, however, is said to 
concentrate himself upon family life, and to prefer the activities of 
the farm, which is his country residence, to more spectacular pur- 
suits. 

The new President has given evidence of firmness and strength in 
his dealings with strikes and with manifestations of social turbulence. 
He would appear to be a firm and strong man of clear convictions 
and thoroughly versed in the technique of the business of govern- 
ment. It would seem as if he had all the qualifications for the 
onerous position and that our country again is fortunate in the man 
who is to be at the wheel. The presidency is such a tremendous task 
for any man that we can but wish luck. Six Presidents have reached 
the chair by reason of the death of their predecessor. Out of these, 
but one was ever re-elected and that was the indomitable President 
Roosevelt. Mr. Coolidge has a hard task ahead, and he carries into 
the chair all the good wishes and prayers of his fellow-citizens. 



Sometimes we wonder what is the secret of 
The Mayor As a Man the continual popularity of the Mayor, and 

why in a somewhat difficult constituency, like 
this city, he is always able to maintain himself and to keep the essen- 
tial good will of the mass of citizens. We say this, not out of any 
feeling of enthusiastic sympathy with the political achievements of 
the Mayor, for there are many things which we do not like in his 
methods. There are activities of his which we regard as dangerous 
to the community and as quite unbefitting the position which he oc- 
cupies. For example, it is well known that the unions have always 
been his pets and that organized labor has, and always has had, an 
influence with the Mayor's office which it should not have, and which 
is not for the best interest of the community. This tendency to coddle 
labor is a very distressing symptom which the Mayor's office always 
displays. But, when it is a matter of natural generosity and spon- 
taneous good will, then the Mayor is to be found at his best. We 
may say with truth that he is always kind, and that he knows no 
social grades in the exercise of his kindness. We are moved to this 
expression by the acts of the Mayor during the past week of the 
sickness of the late President. Mayor Rolph has been everything that 
the people of the city would have wished their executive to be. He 
has not spared himself, has been thoughtful, kindly and his own best 
self. 



There is effective proof that nearly all the eJi- 
Antiquated Ideas torials in the country are written by men of 

middle age, who have not developed since they 
were taught at college. To such men there are such things as plans 
and schemes of social development. They talk about systems and 
philosophies as being fixed rules by which the progress of man may 



August 11, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



be guided. One talks of the capitalistic system as if he were talking 
about something permanent, which must of necessity last forever, be- 
cause it is right. Another talks of the principles of pure democracy 
as if Mr. Jefferson in the long ago had stated absolute truths against 
which the winds and tides of time might beat in vain. To reason in 
this way is to ignore the whole of what we learned from the develop- 
ment of scientific thought and to neglect what the Victorian age has 
brought of good among a heap of rubbish. All life, social life in- 
cluded, is a being and a becoming. It has no permanence and it 
never dies, because it never persists. The only sure thing is change 
and when one speaks of any human system as if it were a house 
or anything to which the term permanence may be in any way at- 
tached, he shows his inability to grasp the very essentials of social 
science. All this is apropos of an article in a daily here on Friday. 
The conclusions are good but the reasoning utterly vicious. The 
editor was taking Woodrow Wilson to task for an article in the "At- 
lantic Monthly." Curiously enough, the ex-President suffers from the 
same strabismus as the editor in considering matters of political and 
social significance. He chose to base his ideas on the reconstruction 
of Europe on what he considered the permanent bases of race and 
language. Here he was at sea. Economic advantage is a much bet- 
ter basis and the recent history of Europe has shown this to be the 
case. The man that built his house upon the sand in the parable 
might really have thought that he was rearing it on a rock, after all. 



There are people who quite refuse to see things. 
Ostn'ch Minds They are the ostrich-minded who put their heads in 

the sand, as much to avoid seeing as being seen, and, 
being thus mentally reversed, as it were, think with their tails. Of 
such sort was the gentleman who the other day wro'.e an article show- 
ing that geniuses, mechanical and artistic, were well rewarded nowa- 
days. Now, if there is one thing truer than another, it is the fact 
that inventors, even industrial inventors, are not well rewarded as a 
rule. It is perfectly true that one may find an occasional inventor 
who has, with his inventive ability, a sort of business sense and can 
thus manage to exploit his talents advantageously. But such is by no 
means the rule. The inventor per se is quite as badly off today as 
he ever was, and in many cases is obliged, by the conditions of em- 
ployment, to part with his own invention, which becomes dis- 
associated from his name and is the property absolutely of the em- 
ploying firm. The same thing holds good in other directions. On 
the whole, and we are not saying this critically at all, the tendency 
of modern life is to absorb the fruits of genius and to deny genius 
any standing. Only when extraordinary advertising chances are pre- 
sented, does the originator profit. 



Having had, from our early youngsterhood, a 

Parental Paresis great desire to work along architectural lines, our 

parents saw fit to spend time and money on our 

musical education, when (although we love good music) we had 

no more inclination as regards interpreting it, than a fish. 

Someone once said: "Enough money is spent annually in the 
United States upon music, for children who have no talent for it, 
to pay off the National debt several times over. 

Parents have a very uncomfortable, often tragic, penchant for 
forcing square pegs into round holes; for making an attorney out 
of George when he shows every sign of an embryo mechanic: of 
drumming music into Jane, when she might have been a capable 
landscape garden?,. All normal children show leanings at an early 
age towards the avocation in which they could do their best work: 
it is onlv the stupidity and blindness of parents which prevents then- 
seeing this, and developing to the best of their pocketbooks and 
ability, the natural gifts of their offsprings along the desired hn< s 



Read what John M. Siddall, late editor of the American Magazine, 
has to say anent these same round pegs in square holes: 

"People go into the law when they have real love for the dairy 
business, and into music when they are born hardware dealers. 
Schooled to believe they ought to like this or that, they are ready to 
try to like what is 'expected' of them — to adopt other people's ideas 
of what would be a reputable and proper calling for 'one in your 
position,' and so on through a lot of foolishness. To hear them 
complain about their work, you might think they were in jail. They 
are. 

"The acid test to apply to your job is this: If you had money 
enough to live on, would you stay at it without pay? If you don't love 
it that much, hunt for another — that is, if you are a young man 
and free from the responsibilities and obligations which govern old- 
er men. The greatest successes in the world are 'crazy' about their 
work. Look at Edison. Look at Paderewski. How these men en- 
joy their jobs! Can anyone imagine that they love money more 
than work? Both men are artists. They have found what they 
wanted to do and stuck to it. Treat yourself as if you were an 
artist. To a certain extent you probably are — in some lines — if you 
will avoid shams and give yourself fully to your job." 

And here is what another right-minded person has to say upon the 
"divine right of parents," in "molding" their children's characters: 

"Horrible word, 'mold'! since it describes a process fundamentally 
untrue. A child is not a bit of clay to be shaped at a parent's whim, 
into a beautiful vase or a serviceable dish. We should feel it sac- 
rilege to hand our children the ready-to-wear garments of person- 
ality, better to let them cut and fit the suits of their own design, 
better to watch and encourage their own slow and clumsy pattern- 
making; better to be humble on-lookers than omniscient intrud- 
ers, better to be ready with first-hand observation and relevant sym- 
pathy than with all the old oracles of parenthood. Whatever our 
personal opinions or those of our children, the point is that we must 
learn to disagree impersonally, to argue on an equal footing, and 
never to take advantage of our position as parents to bolster up 
a losing side; never to say, 'You're very young, my dear, and when 
you've lived as long as I have you'll think differently.' The tragedy 
of life is that they probably will. It is certainly not a prophecy to 
make with any enthusiasm." 

Watch your children carefully from the time they begin to toddle; 
notice their inclinations and guide them along the paths they — not 
you — choose; eliminate your false pride, and let Harry "work 
with tools" if he wants to, instead of forcing him into some pro- 
fession in which he will prove a forlorn failure; as for Annie, it 
may be her fortune to shine in some good man's kitchen, rather 
than at the piano. 

If the mothers and fathers of the race could be influenced into 
thinking that perhaps, after all, their children are not always super- 
latively gifted along artistic or professional lines, much money, time 
and perhaps suffering, might, on occasions, be avoided. This ob- 
tuseness en the part of parents is half the reason, we believe, that 
the world is all awry. 



The amalgamation of the American National 
Another Bank Merges Bank and the Security Bank and Trust 

Company has occurred, and the latter bank's 
premises, in the rear of the American National Bank, will be used 
as the savings department. The merged banks will have a change 
in name and will be known as the American Bank of San Fran- 

The resources of this bank will amount to $40,000,000 and the 
American National in order to affect the merger, resigned its Fed- 
eral charter. On next Monday it will be a State bank. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August II, 1923 



IlBI^y TfiE>l£ 




■s^t-j^JS^, 



By KEM 

?fTTE THAT shall make search after knowledge let him seek 
X J. it where it is, there is nothing I prof esse lesse. These are 
but my fantasies, by which I endeavor not to make things known, 
but my selfe."— Montaigne, "On Bookes." 



THE REALLY ROMANTIC AGE. by L. Allen Harker, is the 
story of a pleasant, unadventurous English maiden lady, with middle 
age in front of her, who is bequeathed a baby, with the dying 
mother's request that she love and cuddle it— because uncuddled 
babies do not thrive. We know from the first that this timid lady 
will overcome all awkwardness in learning to "mother" little Joe, 
and that big, kindly, near-elderly man who is Joe's godfather, will 
presently marry the no-longer young heroine, though he quotes 
Bernard Shaw to fortify himself with platonic tenderness and tells 
himself conscientiously that "there are such wonderful sorts of 
relations, and close togetherness, and babes in the woodiness, be- 
sides being in love." Yes, there are no surprises in this quiet, 
refined English story, and, though we are told Joe is full "of kick, 
wiggle and bounce" every minute, yet he seems slow to readers 
brought up on American "Helen's Babies" and Booth Tarkington's 
"Penrod and Sam," but in spite of being Britishly-mannered — he is 
really a baby, and therefore, of interest to all woman readers, 
motheringly inclined; also the mature like to believe the author 
proves her point, that "youth is practical and middle age is the 
time for true romance," and the young like to think that romance 
can hold out that long, so it makes a very satisfactory novel 
for the romantic readers. 

Scribner's — $2.00. 



SLIPPERY AS SIN, by Pierre Souvestre and Marcel Allain, is a 
detective story by the authors of "FANTOMAS," in which crime 
runs rampant and murderers, abductresses and policemen tread 
the boards in truly French fashion. 

Moffatt, Yard and Co.— $2.00. 



CHILDREN OF CHANCE, by M. Anthony Carlyle, is a popular 
adventure romance in which a girl masquerader, a wonderful hero 
— a dark London night full of horrors, are all realistically man- 
ipulated. 

Houghton, Mifflin— $2.00. 

THE CITY OF LILIES, by Anthony Pryde and R. K. Weeks, 
came out early this spring and is still being read by those who like 
a "Graustark" type of story. It is a colorful romance with a fair 
masquerader, a capricious prince, and plenty of palpitating situa- 
tions. 

Published by Robert M. McBride.— $2.00. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

*f PAUL ELDER'S 



239 Post Street 



AND PAUL ELDERS LIBRARY 



San Francisco 



SKYLINE INN, by Donald Mackail, is a California story, and one 
finds a remarkable chef at this inn in the High Sierras, and plenty 
of entertainment of a whimsical nature, including a prizefight. 

Houghton, Mifflin— $2.00. 



RAISIN GROWERS' ASSOCIATION. 

Last week we spoke about the folly of insisting on the en- 
forcement of the Sherman anti-trust act these days. And the fed- 
eral district attorney appears also to be of our state of mind, par- 
tially, at least, as the proceedings against the Sun Maid Raisin 
Growers' Association have been, at least, temporarily, held up. 
This interference with economic processes of production and dis- 
tribution will not help. It embarrasses the development of ihe 
country and makes people poorer. If a person cannot co-operate 
he should have to stand the consequences of his own lack of 
adaptability. 



OUR CLIMATE 

Boasting and Boosting can become ridiculous, and a great deal 
of the climate talk during the illness of the President came under 
that category. Of course our climate is better than that of the in- 
terior, and is more to be enjoyed than the brand furnished by the 
eastern states at this period of the year. But, after all, when one 
launches into a panegyric on the constant fogs and wind, it is car- 
rying a joke a little too far. As for the stranger, it may just be 
the tonic that he needs, but the steady dweller in this most be- 
loved of cities, ought to get away for a week or two in the summer 
and have a good baking. He will feel the benefit in November. 



46 



*» 




S^TKICK 

in a Kilowatt 



The unit of measurement for electricity 
is the Kilowatt Hour. Each Kilowatt Hour 
costs only a few cents. 

And yet but one Kilowatt Hour represents the 
amount of energy required to raiseasoo-pound 
man 13,277 feet — nearly three and one-half 
times as high as Mt. Diablo! 

Think what the work of one Kilowatt Hour 
would cost if you hired men to do it. Then con- 
sider the wonderful convenience and service 
of electricity and the trifling cost for its use. 

PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 



PG 




• and 



"PACIFIC SERVICE' 



27-S23 



August II, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




TownpJlCrier 



D WHO THE DEVILART THOU 

ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
I PEVIL,SIR WITH VOU." 

— ^Shakspeare- 



— An attorney from Fresno, a Mr. Lewis H. Smith, in a speech 
before the Exchange Club, at the Palace Hotel, the other day, 
made the remark, "It is axiomatic that our markets are to us of 
the most vital import." To which we reply, "Thank you for — no- 
thing." Talk like that is just talk and nothing more and has not 
an ounce of sense behind it. Everybody knows that if a man 
produces things he has to have a market. The question with us 
is: what market? A lot depends on that. If a foreign market, 
then we have to get in with Europe somehow, and restore busi- 
ness. If a domestic market is enough, then Mr. Johnson is right, 
and we can live by taking in one another's washing. My, but 
they have wise men in Fresno! 

— Things improve slowly, so slowly very often as to be almost 
at a standstill, as far as the eye can see. But they do move and 
they do improve, even popular manners, which are proverbially 
hard to change. The last great funeral that the Town Crier saw 
move down our streets was that of General Lawton, whose body 
was brought from the Philippines. There was a great contrast be- 
tween the behavior of the crowd on last Friday and that on the 
occasion of the funeral of the general named. This time, the 
order was marked, the behavior quiet, and well in control, the sa- 
lutes to the flag and the body, evenly and well maintained. On 
the whole, one took great comfort in observing the growth in the 
graces of our people. Democracy is justifying itself after all. 

— There is talk in the papers about an injunction which they 
are trying to get in Sacramento against the I. W. W. It would 
be fine if it could be done. It might save jury trials, and the 
criminal law could be administered by a judge sitting alone and 
unhampered by anything, save political considerations. But some- 
how, there seems something a little off about it to a careful ob- 
server. We have a sort of sneaking idea that in the course of 
the history of the Anglo Saxon peoples, there has been a lot of 
tlood-shed to prevent interference with trials by jury. This, of 
course, may be a mere superstition, and perhaps it can be done. 
But, if it can, many hosts of heroes will wring their hands ihat 

they died in vain. 

¥ * * 

— To go to Marin County on Sunday is to be in a crowd, which, 
on the whole, is peculiar to this part of the world, and which man- 
ifests a curious sort of ability to maintain itself fairly decently in 
tempting conditions. When I say this, I am quite aware of the 
hiker nuisance. But those who break the laws of decency and of 
the statute book, are very few in comparison with the great masses 
who enjoy themselves well and with propriety. You see a wild- 
haired little devil of a girl in knickers and you look out for 
squalls. Nine times out of ten she settles down with perfect pro- 
priety and may even read a book. In nothing is our social prog- 
ress shown more plainly than in our outing crowds. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter 1130 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



— How is it that the Church is able to perpetuate for centuries its 
standard of intellectual accomplishment and generous altruism) 
The question occurs when one reads of the laying of the foundation 
stone of the new Dominican Church to replace the old one, de- 
stroyed in the fire. For centuries the Dominicans have been pil- 
lars of learning, men of grave and dignified mien and large ac- 
complishment. New countries have swum into ken, thrones have 
disappeared, fire and sword have devastated Europe many times 
and the church organization almost doubled up under the blows 
of the Reformation. But here are the Dominicans, building an- 
other of their wonderful churches, as they have builded so many 
hundreds in the past, seven thousand miles from their original 
home, nearly eight hundred years since the order was founded. 
Events have justified the mother of St. Dominic, who dreamed 
that she was going to have a boy born with a torch in his mouth. 

— They say that Senator Johnson might have been Vice Presi- 
dent last time, but that, dreading the hoodoo of the job and the 
president nominated being a particularly strong man, he re- 
fused. Of course how true all this is, I don't know, and whether 
or not it is a pious afterthought of the followers of the Seraphic 
One. At any rate the presidential goal is to all appearances fairly 
well removed from our benign senator. And yet, when it is re- 
membered that Roosevelt was the only vice president to date to 
take the presidential chair after the death of his predecessor, it 
does not look so awfully unpromising. But would it not be just in 
accord with the queerness of things if the World Court notion 
should get an impetus from the death of its proponent? Such 
things have happened, and those who have ridiculed the living 

preacher, have adored the dead saint. 

* * * 

— Professor Wickson, of the State University, died recently, 
leaving an estate of $100,000. The phenomenal rise in the value 
of Berkeley real estate during the last quarter of a century has 
made independent little fortunes for more than one of the old pro- 
fessorial families. They were rather a canny lot that settled on the 
campus in the old days, and most of them managed to look after 
themselves fairly well. If you will look at the names, you will see 
that even learning does not obscure the practical common sense of 
the old stock. 

— The Bay cities must have poured thousands into San Fran- 
cisco on the occasion of the departure of the remains of the late 
President. Every restaurant in town was full at 7 o'clock and 
for the most part with people that one hardly ever sees in town. 
It was most impressive in the crowded restaurants, without music, 
and the people solemn and grave. There has not been anything 
as characteristically fine since the Armistice Day, when the town 

really did show itself to the greatest advantage. 

* * * 

— That devil of a traffic cop down at the ferries is at his old 
tricks. I have complained before, that at two minutes to train 
time, he ties up all the car traffic and allows the accumulated ve- 
hicles to pass. This makes one lose the boat. One minute would 
make all the difference. He gave us that for a week and all was 
merry. Now he has returned to his old tricks again. What with 
the state train and the traffic cop, life is hard on the commuter. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Ness Ave., at Geary Street SAN PBAN CISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. HOODBIRY Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 



1923 



Hggggggggggj 

g g 

@ g 

g 



I 1 



The Exchange Problem 



^ss^?K?^.?::sxSj5i??::j:SISi:S = : ~ :: " :: i 



By ONLOOKER. 

gggggggg ggggggg 









I WOULD be the last to write a word that would make one feather 
fly in the barnyard. Much of my life, indeed, is spent in pouring 
oil on wateis that persist in remaining troubled, despite my eager- 
ness to help the present situation by piling up the consumption 
records of that subject of overproduction. But, being asked to ex- 
press my opinion as to the desirability of a consolidation of the two 
exchanges functioning in the city of San Francisco, I am willing to 
oblige, on the distinct understanding that I claim no inside knowl- 
edge, and express only the viewpoint of the man in the street. And 
1 hope that I may not meet the fate usual to those who butt in on 
domestic quarrels. 

My first question would be, why two exchanges? I am told that 
it is not so long since there was but one, located in Montgomery 
street, that made a business of dealing with general securities. An- 
other exchange there was in Bush street, that specialized in mining 
stocks. The arrangement worked well enough, if my information is 
correct. But — I write under correction — the story goes that a promi- 
nent member of the Montgomery street establishment held different 
views from his brothers as to the value of discipline. He did not 
like some of the rules framed by the Governors, and objected to 
framing his conduct in accordance with them. He was not ex- 
actly what you would call a "conscientious objector," but he did 
like his own way. I can sympathize with him, for I have been a 
rebel all my life. I, however, nurse no grievance against those w r ho 
may have been so foolish as not to see my point of view, and who 
have persisted in maintaining against me the rules of the establish- 
ment they control. It is their funeral, and it has happened, even 
to me, that at a later period I have been willing to agree that the ways 
of others were better than mine. If, as has happened, they have be- 
come converted to my way of thinking, I have been content to watch 
the progress of their "reformation" from a distance. I have never 
begged for readmission to any fold that I have left. 

I am told that the hero of my tale, resigning from the exchange 
in which he felt uncomfortable — because, some say, he could not 
rule it — sought and obtained admission to the mining exchange. In- 
stalled there, he introduced dealings in other securities than mines, 
persuading other financial houses to procure admission to his new 
home — in short, developed an "Opposition." He has, I am told, ef- 
fected changes of a valuable character in the conduct of the es- 
tablishment of his adoption: has undoubtedly justified his position of 
leadership therein. 

But, it is said, he is not satisfied, he now wishes to effect a 
"consolidation" of the two exchanges. I do not quite like ihe idea 
of a "Consolidated Exchange" in San Francisco. New York is wel- 
come to a monopoly of the title. In any case, why should the 
rulers of the deserted home be expected to repeat the "fatted calf" 
episode? Prodigal sons have always appealed to me, but I do not 
expect sensible men to share my views, and I most certainly would 
not wish my worst enemy to have to pay, as I have had to do more 
than once, for a weakness in this respect. Prodigal sons are inter- 
esting enough, often even amusing, but I would not label them sat- 
isfactory as a class. There are exceptions, of course. Permanent 
reforms are rare, but there is always hope. Nevertheless, the experi- 
ment is dangerous, and it seems that the Montgomery street folk are 
nervous. Anyhow, I am given to understand that there is "nothing 
doing." 

I am told that one strong exchange would be better than two weak 



ones. Granted, but we have one strong exchange, located on Mont- 
gomery street. In what respect will it be the stronger for an al- 
liance? I fear there is but one solution, the return of the prodigal, 
chastened by his experiences, a wiser if a sadder man. With him, 
many of his newly-found associates would, doubtless, be received, 
and it is possible that useful service might be rendered by some 
of them. 

There are many ways to get your own way, and if it is a good 
way, your reward is sure, in the gratitude of those who have come 
round to your way of thinking. But kicking against the pricks lands 
no one anywhere. 



WORDS OF WISDOM. 

A hen is the only living critter that can set still and produce divi- 
dends — Exchange. 

About the time you think you make both ends meet, somebody 
moves the ends. — Exchange. 

Prosperity will come when men watch their work instead of 
watching the clock work. — The Beehive. 



She — Papa said you had more money than brains. 
Reggie — Ha! That's one on your father, I'm broke. 
"Yes; Papa added that you were." — Amherst Lord Jeff. 



Announcement 




San Francisco Law School 

74 New Montgomery St.. Third Floor, Call Building 
FOUR-YEAR COURSE 
EVENING SESSIONS 

FOR 

MEN AND WOMEN 

CLASSES CONVENE 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER FIFTH 

THE SECRETARY WILL BE AT THE 

OFFICE EVERY EVENING 6:45 TO S:00 

EXCEPTING SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

Telephone For Appointment At 
Other 'rimes- - Kearn) 4251 



August II, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




SOMETIMES LIKE DISTANT MUSIC. 

By F. Corson Miller. 

Sometimes, like distant music heard in sleep. 

Your presence blows across my troubled eyes, 
Slow-radiant, as when last colors creep, 
To say farewell to fading evening-skies. 

Then do the trembling bells of memory toll 
Far down youth's disenchanted spiral-stair. 

Where love once walked, wearing an aureole 

Of flowers whose fragrance makes all pathways fair. 

And, lo, as tides of heart-break ebb away, . 

White birds that are your glances flutter and pass 
My dream-portieres; the world of pomp and play 
Recedes — becomes a lane of June-sweet grass. 

Where moon-hushed elms in greenest glory shine, 
Where stars are nuptial-lights, and you are mine. 

— From "Voices.' 



TRAVELER'S DITTY. 

By Miriam Allen deFord. 

Come day, go day, 

There's sorrow at the end of it. 
Turn road, wind road. 

There's mystery in the bend of it. 
Oh, all the winds of all the worlds 

That lose themselves in starry spaces 
Can never blow the secret off 

That stares at us in common faces. 

Life long, life short, 

There's love to meet in tears or laughter. 
Die soon, die late. 

There's Grandsir Death to walk with, after. 
And be you great or be you small, 

There's no way out but going through it. 
Oh, curious fate that makes us live, 

But will not teach us how to do it! 

— From "Poetry. 



CONTENTMENT 

If I uproot 

My one rose-tree. 

Will the world be happier 

Because of me? 

A Heaven that meant me 

Sad to be, 

Should not have given me 

My rose-tree. 

— Francis Shaw, 



LEAF FALL. 

By Harol Vinal. 
You who have loved wild apples on a hill 

And the clear, silver way of April rain, 
You who have known Spring moonlight on a lane. 

Will weep your heart out for a daffodil. 
Now that the windy leaves fall to the grass, 

Now that the salty luggers come from the sea. 
You know how such things end for you and me, 
That at the last all lovely things must pass. 

Stand on this hill and watch the leaves go down, 
do not fear the sinking of the moon, 

This is the way of Autumn with a town, 

Ardor and passion, they are over soon. 

A wind, an avalanche and that is all — 

Then not a bird left singing on a wall. 

— From "The Nomad.' 



IN TIME OF LONG HEAT. 

By David Morton. 
The gift of twilight at the hot day's end; 

This chambered darkness, cast of many trees. 
The cool, green quiet coming like a friend — 

Is grateful healing for such days as these. 
Here where the white and pitiless sun had passed, 

A blighting presence on the stricken street, 
The slow and gradual dusk returns at last, 

And enters in on hushed and gentle feet. 

The long, blue ways turn lovely for her sake. 

Who comes with slumber shadowed in her eyes; 

The hidden birds stir drowsily awake 

For sleepy calling where the last light dies — 

Grateful for solace at the hot day's end. 

For cool, green darkness coming like a friend. 

— From "Voices.' 



"Poetry." 



ONE MANAGEMENT FOR STREET CAR LINES. 

Now that the new City merger with San Mateo municipalities has 
been proposed and very likely will go through, it is more essential 
than ever that we should have a unified street car system, for the 
peninsula depends upon San Francisco for support in solving its 
transportation problems. There can be very little improvement in 
the street railway or the interurban lines, until we have our whole sys- 
tem under one ownership and control. There is a very attractive 
district south of us that, to develop into the right sort of community, 
should have our co-operation, and its several officials have signified 
their willingness (unlike the Alameda County fathers), to come into 
our fold, and be one with us. San Francisco has one direction only, 
at present, in which to expand, and that expansion depends almost 
entirely upon convenient transportation. 

Men of sound business sense, like Mayor Rolph and the President 
of our Chamber of Commerce, are backing this idea of one manage- 
ment for street car facilities, and it is up to the city to carry it out. 
Are we all Rip Van Winkles, who will some day awake from our 
slumbers to find that cities of far less importance have leaped ahead 
of us? 

The San Francisco Journal recently printed a half-page adver- 
tisement by a woman scribe denouncing tru "Star Spangled Banner 
and calling us "Protestant America." The loquacious propagand- 
ette should have looked about a bit and she'd find the United States 
holds also a few Jews. Catholics, agnostics, infidels. Mormons and 
57 other varieties — nearly all of them pretty good Americans. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 11, 1923 



^r | Stars That Have Swung Into Our Orbit I ^r 

| By AN OLD THEATER-GOER 1 



SAN FRANCISCO has always been re- 
garded as a good show town from the 
very earliest stage of its existence, and most 
of the actors and actresses of world-known 
fame have come to us at one time or an- 
other. Not only that, but many who have 
afterwards shone as stars of much magni- 
tude have appeared here in more humble 
capacity, a number of them, indeed, gradu- 
ated from the old California stock company, 
rightly regarded as the very best in the whole 
country. To write of all our visitors at length 
would require more space than the limits of 
an article like this affords. Therefore, a brief 
mention regarding the most famous of our 
guests must suffice. 

As the steamers via Panama were for many 
years the only means of reaching San Fran- 
cisco, engagements were made for never less, 
frequently more, than four weeks, and indeed 
it so remained for some time after the over- 
land road was in operation. Besides our own 
countrymen and women of fame in the East, 
visitors came to us from Germany, Italy, 
England and France. Among the first to come 
was Mrs. Julia Dean Hayne, who made her 
debut at the Metropolitan Theatre in June, 
1856, as Julia in "The Hunchback," with 
Charles Pope, who accompanied her from 
the East, as leading man. She was a beauti- 
ful woman, and a pleasing actress, but would 
probably be considered in these days as 
rather stagey. She became a great favorite, 
a popularity she maintained, playing many 
engagements during the years of her resi- 
dence in California. It was at this time that 
Lola Montez was playing at the American 
Theater. 

When that veteran English actor, Charles 
Keene, and his wife came from Australia on 
their farewell tour of the world, in October, 
1864, they were accompanied by J. F. Cath- 
cart, George Everett and Miss Chapman, a 
niece of Mrs. Keene, who appeared with them 
in every play. They made their initial ap- 
pearance in "Henry VIII" and "The Jealous 
Wife." It at once became apparent that they 
had been accustomed to a larger stage than 
the small one at Maguire's Opera House, 
their gestures, especially those of Mrs. Keene 
as Queen Katherine, being better suited to 
more spacious surroundings. They were en- 
thusiastically received and played a six 
weeks' engagement to crowded houses, ap- 
pearing in old favorites, and in two Shake- 
spearian plays hitherto unknown to San 
Francisco — "King John" and "Richard II." 
But the general opinion was that Mr. Keene 
was at his best in "Louis XI." 

Mr. Keene was fond of telling some of his 
slage experiences, and among others was one 
of "Hamlet." He said he once played it in 




Lotta, as "Little Nell," at the old Califor- 
nia Theater, August 10, I860. 



London for one hundred consecutive nights, 
requiring for the first fifty a little prompting. 
From then on he was letter perfect, until the 
one hundredth night, when he stepped on to 
the stage he could not remember one word 
of the play — no more than if he had never 
seen it. 

When Edwin Forrest came in June, 1866, 
he was accompanied by John McCullough, as 
leading man. Tickets were sold at auction for 
his first appearance at Maguire's in "Riche- 




Lawrence Barrett and John McCullough 



lieu," to a crowded house. But his engage- 
ment was not altogether a success. He intro- 
duced some new reading in his Shakespearian 
representations — notably "Macbeth" — and 
new "business" which were not improve- 
ments, and his health was not of the best. 
Finally, feeling really ill, he cancelled the 
rest of his engagement before it was fin- 
ished, and returned East, after releasing Mc- 
Cullough from his engagement with him, and 
McCullough remained as leading man at Ma- 
guire's until the opening of the California 
Theater, of which he and Lawrence Barrett 
became joint managers. 

Lawrence Barrett's first appearance in San 
Francisco was at Maguire's, in "Hamlet," in 
February, 1868, and he was what might be 
called an instant success, his popularity in- 
creasing with each new play that he pre- 
sented. His first engagement lasted eleven 
weeks, with a return one of five weeks, played 
before his departure for the East, from 
whence he was to return as joint manager of 
the California Theater with John McCul- 
lough. 

Edwin Adams was always a favorite with 
San Francisco audiences and he paid us 
many visits. His first appearance was at Ma- 
guire's, in June, 1867, as "Hamlet," in 
which he did not appear to so much advan- 
tage as he did later in "Wild Oats," or in one 
of Robertson's pretty plays, like "Ours" and 
"Home." 

Mrs. D. P. Bowers was another who was 
popular in San Francisco and always greeted 
with delight by crowded houses. Her first ap- 
pearance was as Mary Stuart at the Metro- 
politan in April, 1868. Opinion was divided 
as to which was her best character — Mary 
Stuart, Queen Elizabeth or Marie Antoinette. 
She was a fine actress and during her many 
visits to San Francisco she was always gladly 
welcomed. 

That sterling actor, E. L. Davenport, ac- 
companied by Mrs. Davenport, opened an en- 
gagement at the Metropolitan in "Hamlet," 
June, 1868. But the great night of his en- 
gagement was when he was given a testi- 
monial farewell benefit. The play was "Lon- 
don Assurance," and it was a star cast al- 
most throughout. Davenport appeared as 
Dazzle, Barrett as Charles Courtley, McCul- 
lough as Mark Harkaway, Harry Edwards as 
Sir Harcourt Courtley, Mrs. Davenport as 
Lady Gay Spanker, Emelie Melville as Grace 
Harkaway, Willie Edouin as Dolly Spanker 
and Harry Jackson as Mark Meddle. Another 
event of the Davenport engagement was 
when "The School for Scandal" was given 
for the benefit of C. W. Couldock, when 
Davenport took the part of Charles Surface, 
Mrs. Barrows was Lady Teazle, Charles 



August II. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



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— dancing every evening; swimming 
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Make Reservations in Advance 

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California's Vacation Land 



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Fifth Floor, 135 Stockton St. 

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Second Floor, 240 Stockton St. 

San Francisco 



Wheatleigh as Crabti-e and Harry Edwards 
as Sir Peter Teazle, cue of his best parts. 

What a gala night was the opening of the 
California Theater on January 18, 1869! 
There was positively not an inch of standing 
room to spare. The play was "Money," with 
McCullough as Alfred Evelyn, and Mrs. Ray- 
mond the Clara Douglas of the cast, than 
which a better one can hardly be imagined. 
The first eight weeks were devoted to plays 
by the stock company headed by Barrett and 
McCullough. First night audiences greeted all 
these productions with enthusiasm, particu- 
larly Robertson's pretty play of "School," 
and "Julius Caesar," when McCullough and 
Barrett appeared as Brutus and Cassius, two 
characters that fitted them to perfection. The 
first star who came to the California stage 
was John Owens, in his celebrated character 
of Solon Shingle, appearing in March, 1869. 
Then in July came John Brougham in his 
round of characters. During his engagement 
he dramatized the novel of "Ann Judge, 
Spinster," calling the play "The Red Light," 
and it had a long and successful run. It was 
also during his engagement that the new 
burlesque of "Ixion" was produced and it 
literally took the town by storm. The char- 
acters all seemed to fit. Especially funny was 
Raymond's Minerva, in which he dressed as 
an old maid, and his song and dance of The 
Grecian Bend never failed to bring down the 
house. 

And then came little Lotta, who San Fran- 
cisco claimed as its own, as here it was that 
she first appeared upon any stage — then al- 
most a child. She received quite an ovation 
in "Little Nell" and "The Marchioness" — her 
first play — in August, 1869, and she drew 
record houses during her engagement of four 
weeks. (To be continued.) 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

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The Most Popular Restaurant 

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05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'liniio Keurny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
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FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



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Phone Douglas 2433 




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DAILY 

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bath $3.50 

Two persons, room with 

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One person, room without 

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Two persons, room without 

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WEEKLY RATES 

One person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

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One person, room without 

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„ * golf, fishing, 

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en ,. ing. European 

netter plan — dining 

cZ>/w M room in connec- 

riace tion. Come by 

tt\ Hn" state Highway 

10 Kj0 or S. P. Open the 

^^^■hi year round. 

CASA 
DEL REK° 



Boyes Hot Springs 

4 5 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. W. P. R . R. 

Beautiful New Golf Course 

Blnrk Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths, Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools, Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. LICHTENBERG, Boyes Springs. 

Or Peck-Judah, 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRBRI 



Old Poodle Dog 




REST A I RANT AMD 
GRIM. 

3."> New Montgomery St. 

te Palace Hotel 
(Formerly 
BERGEZ FRANK'S 
i .1.1 1 POODLE DOG, 

415-4:7 Rush b't.l 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

. Fremli Dinner 

Served liwily Bxeept 

Sunday From ."• p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A I.s (arte 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 11, 1923 




BUSY CUPID. 

RYAN-CARROLL — An interesting engagement announced in New 
York is that of Miss Nina Ryan, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John B. Ryan and granddaughter of Mr. Thomas Fortune 
Ryan, and Colonel Philip Acosta Carroll, the owner of Dough- 
oregan Manor, and a member of one of America's most dis- 
tinguished families. 

Miss Ryan made her debut three years ago in New York and 
Colonel Carroll is the son of the late John Lee Carroll, Gov- 
ernor of Maryland. The wedding will take place soon and 
the couple will live at Doughoregan Manor. 

PERKINS-THORNTON — Mr. and Mrs. Daniel T. C. Perkins of 
Berkeley announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss 
Dorothy Giffin Perkins, to Mr. Hayne Hollis Thornton, son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Hubbard Thornton of Claremont Court, 
Berkeley. 

Miss Perkins is a granddaughter of the late O. F. Giffin, a 
pioneer of San Francisco and an associate of the bonanza 
kings. 

The Giffin home, on Pine and Jones streets, was one of the 
handsome homes of the city and later became the residence 
of the James G. Fair family. It was there Miss Tessie Fair 
became the bride of the late Herman Oelrichs of New York. 

HOUGHTON-BARRIER — Miss Elsie Houghton, daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward T. Houghton, of Berkeley, whose engage- 
ment to Mr. Maurice Barrier, of Paris, was recently an- 
nounced, will be married some time during the early part 
of October. Following their marriage, the young couple will 
go East by way of the Panama Canal, sailing October 13. 
They will pass some weeks in the East, visiting at different 
points of interest, and will then sail for Paris, where they will 
make their home. Owing to the recent death of her great- 
aunt, Mrs. Hippolyte Dutard, Miss Houghton, has not ac- 
cepted invitations since the announcement of her engagement. 
Mr. Barrier is at the Palace Hotel, where he will be joined 
by his father, Mr. George Barrier, who is coming from 
France for the wedding. 

THEOBALD-BALLINGER — An engagement of interest to Cali- 
fornians. formally made, on Tuesday, in Washington, D. C, 
is that of Miss Alice Theobald, second daughter of Mrs. 
George Theobald of San Francisco, and Mr. Webster Ballinger, 
a prominent attorney in Washington, D. C. The marriage 
will be quietly celebrated on August 15. Until ten years ago 
Mrs. Theobald and her daughter made their home in San 
Francisco, when they went to Washington, in order to be 
near the son of the family, Commander Robert A. Theo- 
bald, U. S. N., who was then on duty at Annapolis, and is 
now in the Orient. 

TYNAN-TAYLOR — Miss Margot E. Tynan, daughter of J. J. Ty- 
nan, vice-president and general manager of the Bethlehem 
Shipbuilding Corporation, is to be married at the family 
home, 2460 Lyon street, late next month. 
Miss Tynan is the sister of the former Miss Josephine Ty- 
nan, who, on November 29 of last year, became the bride of 
James Tattersall of Philadelphia. 

Miss Tynan's fiance is the son of the late J. J. Taylor of Texas, 
a pioneer business man of the Lone Star State. 

LUNCHEONS. 

SHARON — Mrs. Frederick William Sharon was the guest of hon- 
or at the luncheon at which Miss Cora Jane Flood enter- 
tained Tuesday afternoon. The party was held at the Hotel 
Fairmont, where Miss Flood makes her home. 

TEVIS — Dr. Harry Tevis gave a luncheon on Sunday at his 
home near Alma. His sister, Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon, 
spent the week-end with him and assisted in receiving the 
luncheon guests. 

CASTLE — Mrs. Neville Castle gave a luncheon on Sunday at 
her home in Ross Valley, and several friends from town 
were there. Luncheon was served in the garden under a 
huge bay tree. 

EBRIGHT — Mrs. George Elliott Ebright gave a large luncheon 
at the Menlo Country Club last week, assembling a group of 
friends who comprise the Menlo, Palo Alto and Woodside 
summer colonies. 



PERKINS — Miss Helen Perkins gave a luncheon for Miss Mar- 
garet Morgan on Wednesday. 

RITTENHOUSE — Mrs. John V. Rittenhouse gave a luncheon re- 
cently at her home at Pebble Beach, and had among her guests 
Mrs. Eyre Pinkard, Mrs. Arthur Goodfellow, Mrs. Louis Hill, 
Mrs. Frank Lynch, Mrs. McKeevor of Chicago and a few 
others. 

Mr. and Mrs. Pinkard are occupying a cottage at Carmel this 
summer. Dr. and Mrs. Frank Lynch have the Jorgenson 
house in Monterey. 

TOBIN — Mrs. Cyril R. Tobin entertained at a small luncheon at 
her home in San Mateo on Saturday afternoon, on which oc- 
casion her guests were: Mesdames Arthur Brown, Jr., Law- 
rence McCreery, Nion Tucker. Fentriss Hill, Walker Salis- 
bury, Walter G. Filer, Willard Chamberlain, George Gordon 
Moore, Clifford Weatherwax. 

CURRAN — Mr. and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran entertained a small 
group Monday at the St. Francis, including Mrs. George 
Cameron, Mrs. J. O. Tobin and Mrs. Walter Filer. 
TEAS. 

LORD — Mrs. Marion Lord asked a few friends in for tea Tues- 
day afternoon, the occasion being the 91st birthday of her 
mother, the venerable Mrs. Andrew Louderback. 
Mrs. Louderback is one of the notable pioneer grande dames 
of society, one who has cherished the friendships of the many 
decades that she has lived in this State. 

ZIEL — At the charming old Lichtenberg home in San Rafael. Mrs. 
Gustavus Ziel assembled a few friends at tea and a game of 
bridge Monday, her guests including several of the society wo- 
men who are passing the summer months in Marin county. 
BRIDGE. 

ADDIS — In honor of Mrs. Taliaferro Milton, who has been spend- 
ing the summer in San Rafael, with her parents, Mrs. Thom- 
as Addis gave a bridge tea Tuesday afternoon. The party 
was held in Sausalito, where Dr. and Mrs. Addis make their 
home. 

Bidden to meet the visitor from the Atlantic coast were Mrs. 
Alan Cline, Mrs. Van Leer Kirkman, Mrs. Franklin Harwood, 
Mrs. James Jenkins, Mrs. George Beardsley, Mrs. Ralston 
White, Mrs. Leavitt Baker, Mrs. Du Val Moore, Mrs. John 
Partridge, Mrs. Harry Erskine, Mrs. Gladys Jones Weaver and 
Mrs. Hans Wollmann. 

TARBOX — Commander and Mrs. Glennie Tarbox gave a bridge 
party Monday night for Mr. John Gamble, the Santa Bar- 
bara artist, who is here for a few days, after a visit to the 
Bohemian Grove on the Russian river. 

NUTTALI^ — Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall is planning a large bridge and 
mah-jongg party to be given on the afternoon of Friday, Au- 
gust 17. It will be a benefit affair. 
DINNERS. 

GIBSON — Mr. and Mrs. Algernon Gibson were hosts at a small 
dinner at the Burlingame Club Saturday evening, where they 
have moved, and will make their home for the next six 
weeks. 

McNEAR — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear entertained Monday 
evening at a dinner party at the St. Francis Hotel preceding 
the opening performance of Jane Cowl at the Curran. Eight 
guests shared their hospitality. 

BULL — Miss Margaret Morgan of Butte, Mont., who is visiting 
Mrs. Alpheus Bull and her family, was the principal guest 
at a dinner given Friday evening by Miss Newell Bull. The 
party also celebrated the birthday of Miss Bull and her broth- 
er. Alpheus Bull, who are twins. 

MARTIN — Miss Eleanor Martin gave a dinner Saturday evening 
at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter S. Martin, 
in Burlingame. Miss Martin is undecided whether she will 
be a debutante next winter. She went out last season with 
members of the debutante set. 

SPRECKELS — On Saturday evening Mr. Rudolph Spreckels en- 
tertained Mr. and Mrs. James Jackman at a dinner, when 
twenty guests enjoyed his hospitality. 

EPSTEIN — Mrs. Benjamin Epstein gave a very attractive dinner 
for eight guests last Friday at Hotel Richelieu. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August II. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



ELKUS- Mrs. Cordelia de Young Elkua entertained last Snt- 
unlay evening at a Family dinner at the Fairmont Hotel In 
celebration ot her birthday. For several years it baa been 
the custom of .Mrs. Blkus in commemorate iiiis event b] 
sembling the members of her family. 

(in this occasion 32 members of the family, including child- 
ren and grandchildren, were assembled. 

DANCES. 

McNEAR- In honor of .Miss Marie Welch and her sister, Miss 
Florence Welch, both of whom will be debutantes of next 
winter. Mr. and .Mrs. Frederick \V. McNear Will give n dance 
at their country home at Menlo Park, September 1. 

IX TOWN AND OUT. 

McINTOSH — Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Mcintosh have returned to 
their home in this city after a week-end visit in Mendocino 
County. They chaperoned a party of young people while on 
their brief holiday, Miss Jane Carrigan. Miss Aileen Mcin- 
tosh and Miss Mary Julia Crocker having been included in the 
number. 

CLOMAN — Mrs. Sydney Cloman has returned to her home from 
Lake Tahoe, where she has recently been visiting as the guest 
nt Mr. and Mrs. George Newhall. 

CABANISS — Judge and Mrs. George H. Cabaniss and Mr. George 
H. Cabaniss, Jr.. who spent the early part of the summer in 
Southern California, are at present enjoying a motor trip 
through Northwestern states and British Columbia. 

RECH — Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Rech of Chicago took their de- 
parture on Thursday for their home in Chicago. Much en- 
tertaining of an informal nature has been done for them 
since they came to town. The latter's son-in-law and daugh- 
ter, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Duncan (Frances Merrill I, whose 
marriage was an event of last week, are motoring north 
on their honeymoon, with Banff and Lake Louise as the 
objective of their trip. 

CLARK — Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Clark and their children are 
spending much of the summer at their house at Pebble 
Beach. Mr. and Mrs. William C. Antwerp were their guests 
over the week-end. 

MOORE — Mr. and Mrs. Walton N. Moore and Miss Elizabeth and 
Joseph Moore, who have been abroad all year, are being wel- 
comed home. 

LEWENHAFPT — Countess Lewenhaupt and her sons, Jan and 
Alaric, have gone from Palo Alto to Lake Tahoe, where they 
will visit Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Enemark for a few days. 

BARRON — Mr. and Mrs. Ward Barron, Miss Sophia Barron, 
her cousin. Miss Jane Cooper, and Mr. Barron's sister. Miss 
Evelyn Barron, have returned from a trip to the Hawaiian 
Islands. They arrived the latter part of last week. 

ARTSIMOVITCH — Mine. Vladimir Artsimovitch and her sisters. 
Mrs. Jennie Hobbs Goodwin and Mrs. Anna Hobbs Ferris, 
left Saturday for Santa Barbara, where they will spend several 
weeks at "Mira Vista" as the guests of friends. Mme. Artsi- 
movitch will return to San Francisco for a short stay be- 
fore going back to her home in Paris. 

COWDIN — Mrs. Cheever Cowdin arrived in San Francisco last 
week from her home in Cedarhurst, Long Island, for a several 
weeks' visit in California as the guest of her father, Mr. Ed- 
ward W. Hopkins, at his home in California street and at her 
sisters, Mrs. Augustus Taylor and Mrs. Stewart Lowery. at 
Menlo. She was accompanied across the continent by her 
brother-in-law, Mr. Stewart Lowery. who has been in New 
York visiting his mother. Mrs. James Lowery. 

TAYLOR — Mrs. David Armstrong Taylor, wife of Dr. Taylor, 
of this city, is home from a visit abroad, where she was a 
guest of her sister, Mrs. James Corrigan. Through the cour- 
tesy and friendship of Lord and Lady Rossmore. Mrs. Taylor 
was presented at court in June and was present in the throne 
room for all of the formal presentations. 

Following the visit in England, Mrs. Taylor enjoyed a tour 
of the Italian lakes. The Taylors make their home at the 
Fairmont. 

JONES — Mrs. Clinton Jones has returned to her home in San 
Francisco after a visit in Seiners. Mont., where she was the 
guest of her daughter, Mrs. Webb R. Ballard, formerly Miss 
Gertrude Jones of California. 

MADISON- Miss Caroline Madison entertained a house party of 
young people at her home in San Rafael over the week-end, 
anions her guests being Miss . I. sin Howard of this city. Miss 
Madison recently returned from abroad, where she spent the 
summer in travel with her aunt and cousin, Mrs. Freder- 
ick Hope Beaver and Mr. Peter Beaver, following her grad- 
uation from a fashionable school at Fiesole. outside Flor- 
ence. Miss Madison will he one of next season's debutantes. 




By A FLICKER. 

**ri^HF For;" was a much advertised picture, but we were 
A rather disappointed in it. It is about time to relegate 
old stuff like scenes from the world war, into that particular lim- 
bo reserved for worn-outs of the silver screen, and although the 
scenes in this picture are supposed to have taken place in Ver- 
mont, or some such state, we are told they were shot around the 
bay region, which, we think, detracts from its interest, instead 
of increasing it. However, we suppose it is about the only sec- 
tion where fog in such chunks could be secured. The last scene, 
where the heroine climbs a high hill, and entices her lover (who 
has been badly wounded after demolishing several Germans — us- 
ual U. S. stuff I up its steep side, when he is barely ahle to toddle, 
struck us as unnecessarily "crule." 



Alan Crosland will direct the film version of Elinor Glyn's 
famous novel, "Three Weeks." Crosland has arrived in Los An- 
geles from New York, where he had just completed the direction 
of Cosmopolitan's feature, "Under the Red Robe." Mme. Glyn 
herself is now at the studios in Culver City, and will assist in 
the filming of her noted story. The adaption of the novel to 
the screen has just been completed by Cary Wilson in close as- 
sociation with Mme. Glyn. Crosland has been in conference 
with the authoress and adapter since his arrival. Cros- 
land, though, one of the youngest directors in motiion pic- 
tures has made a number of great pictures. His recent produc- 
tion. "Enemies of Women." is regarded by critics and public as 
one of the outstanding pictures of the year. Some ot his other 
pictures have been: "The Face in the Fog," "Slim Shoulders," 
"Why Announce Y'our Marriage," "Room and Board," "Shadows 
of the Sea." and others. 

Pacific coast authorities are conducting a careful search for a 
forger reported to be cashing checks forged with the name of 
Rupert Hughes, prominent author and motion picture director. 

Five checks for amounts varying from $50 to $250 have been 
cashed in Los Angeles. San Francisco. San Jose and Seattle, 
Washington, since June 26, according to police. 

The first check was for $200, and was cashed in Los Angeles, 
June 26; the second, for $250, in San Francisco; the third in 
San Jose, for $100. and the last two in Seattle, for $100 and $50. 

The check cashed in Los Angeles was made out to "Theodore 
Roosevelt, Jr.," and the rest have been payable to "F. P. Peter- 
son." Mr. Hughes, who lives in Los Angeles, and is now direct- 
ing a film version of his own photoplay. "Law Against Law," de- 
clares the copies of his signatures are very cleverly done. 



Mrs. Leslie Carter has set the seal of her approval upon Mae 
Busch's acting. 

Visiting the Culver City studios with Theda Bara. the famous 
Leslie stood behind a screen, so that .Mae could not see her. and 
watched the latter do one of her highly emotional scenes as 
Bessie in "The Master of Man." directed by Victor Seastrom. 

When the lights were cut off. the tears were streaming down 
the stape star's face, as she turned to Miss Bara and whispered, 
"That girl is a wonderful actress!" 



Antonio Guieseppe Dannaninzio. an Italian peanut vendor, en- 
joyed a prosperous day at the Goldwyn studios, when he worked 
in Tod Browning's production of "The Day of Faith." 

The Italian was not content with his salary check alone, for he 
brought his popcorn and peanuts along. Between scenes, he sold 
popcorn and peanuts to such notables as Eleanor Boardman. Ty- 
rone Power, Raymond Griffith, Ford Sterling. Jane Mercer. Wal- 
lace MacDonald, Charles Conklin, Edward Martindel, Winter Hall 
and .lack Curtis. Dannaninzio said he might have made even 
more money, but he had no bananas. 



(TERSTLE— -Mrs. Mark Gerstle and Miss Louise Gerstle have 
returned after a three months' stay abroad. The Gerstles are 
occupying their country place in San Rafael, where they will 
remain until late in the fall. 

TREAT — Mrs. Walter Treat has gone to Lake Tahoe for a visit 
of three weeks. She left her apartments in this city last 
Thursday. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 11, 1923 




By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money VII. 

THE present day situation, in Germany 
and in Russia, is only another evi- 
dence of the olt-stated fact that hietory 
will repeat itself and that people never learn 
through bitter experience. We listen to the 
siren-voiced individual who tells the luring 
tale of wealth easily made and we like to 
listen to the story we know is untrue, be- 
cause the story is well told, and lures with 
greater pull than the story of really honest 
methods. 



Germany and Russia. 

The money minters of Germany and Rus- 
sia are not of the same frame of mind, 
however, and while in Russia, the wild- 
eyed pseudo financiers are issuing roubles 
that have no value, except through the fiat 
of the government; these financiers believe 
they are right. The trouble is in matters of 
finance they are only half-baked. In Ger- 
many, the big financiers and business men 
knew before they began the printing of val- 
ueless paper money marks that these marks 
were of no value except to themselves and 
they staged this huge theft of the profits 
on the labors of Hans and Gretschen for the 
benefit of the manufacturers and money bar- 
ons. The San Francisco News Letter was 
the first newspaper to point out this fact in 
these columns and it is only recently that 
this phase of a monstrous national fraud 
has been written about in other periodicals 
or newspapers. And the end is not yet. 
German stolidness may save Germany from 
a revolution, but that is doubtful. 



France And Its Assignats. 

It should not have been possible for 
France to again undergo money difficulties 
after its bitter experience with the John Law 
fiasco. Yet such is the truth and, before 



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the end of the century, another experiment 
along similar lines plunged France into dis- 
aster and confusion. The Republic, estab- 
lished by the revolution of 1 789, was with- 
out money and money had to be had. To 
increase the supply of money it was proposed 
that such be issued in the form of assignats, 
based upon the Church lands which had been 
confiscated by the Government. These lands 
were yielding no income and were in fact, a 
heavy burden. The money, a form of title 
to the confiscated lards, was called assignats. 
This money was receivable in payment for 
these confiscated lands. It was designed by 
the issue not only to raise a revenue for 
the Government, but to spread the owner- 
ship of the lands among the people. 



A Great Argument. 

There were those in the National Assembly 
who had not forgotten John Law and the 
terrible debacle which followed on the heels 
of his failure. But this argument won the 
day for those who wished to make the issue 
of the paper money — "paper money under 
a despotism is dangerous; it favors corrup- 
tion; but in a nation constitutionally gov- 
erned, which takes care of its own notes, 
which determines their number and use, that 
danger no longer exists." 



The Old, Old Story. 

The same argument has been used here, 
in Rhode Island, and elsewhere, the story 
is the same. The argument was used in 
the Argentines and it was used in Russia 
and in Germany, yesterday. Assignats for 
four hundred million francs, bearing interest, 
were issued. No interest was ever paid and 
subsequent issues did not carry interest pro- 
visions. The first issue was for one-fifth of 
the entire value of the land. 



Never Circulated At Par. 

With this solid basis the assignats never 
circulated at par. Talleyrand opposed the 
issuance of a second series, in a speech of 
wonderful and telling ability. From this 
speech, many passages have been incorpor- 
ated in economic literature as fundamental 
principles. Talleyrand said that no national 
paper could ever be on a par with metals; 
never will the supplementary sign of the 
first representative sign of wealth have the 
exact value of its model; the very title 
Proves Want and Want Spreads Alarm and 
Distrust; the assignat was not a sign of 
wealth, but the forced sign of credit. 



Specie Disappears. 

Specie had dissappeared soon after the 
second issue, and the value of the assignat 
began to go steadily and rapidly downward. 
The inevitable collapse followed. Before the 
assignat reached its final utter worthlessness 
all kinds of efforts had been made to give 
it value. The lands of the emigrated nobles 
were confiscated to this end. By February 
of 1 794 nearly five hundred millions were 
in circulation and a note professing to be 
worth $20 of our money was worth 6 cents, 
in fact. The government then came forward 
with a new scheme and offered to exchange 
"mandat" for thirty assignats. The plates 
for printing assignats were destroyed and six 
hundred millions in mandats were issued. The 
Government indulged itself in "forcing laws" 
and the use of coin was prohibited, the pur- 
chase of specie was forbidden under a pen- 
alty of six years imprisonment; the sale of 
assignats, below par, was forbidden under a 
penalty of thirty years' imprisonment in 
chains at hard labor. Investment of cap- 
ital in foreign countries was punishable by 
death. The value of the assignats went stead- 
ily downward and the great bread riots began 
in Paris. Then the mandats fell, as the as- 
signats had fallen before them. It was use- 
less to give value to paper by calling it by 
another name. Value knows its own laws 
and follows them strictly, regardless of de- 
crees and penalties. And, next week, I will 
give you still another chapter on cheap 
money. Do the people ever learn? In spite 
of all there is in history as to cheap money 
experiments, I will say they do not learn. 



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August II, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 




HE/4RD IT ? 



—Two barbers doped out a tonic for bald heads, rented a small 
store, fixed up a nice window and arranged for some placards that 
were not without appeal. When laymen were not around they in- 
dulged in more or less discussion about their preparation. Thus in 
the midst of a quiet afternoon one of the partners was moved to 
speech. 

"John, I've been thinking." 

"What about, old-timer?" said the other. 

"Does our hair restorer really do the work?" asked the first. 

"It must," declared John easily. 

"Why?" 

"Nobody ever comes back for a second bottle." 
* * * 

— Every lunch hour the negro janitors would gather at some par- 
ticular recess and there would endeavor to tell greater lies than their 
neighbors. On this particular instance a new janitor who had 
traveled a distance of twenty miles had been admitted into the fold. 
He described encounters with monsters and devils that made the 
bravest shrink. 

"Well," he concluded. "Ah guess none uf yo' niggahs has done 
sumpthin' wurf while." 

An old hand spoke up. "Ah's hunted fo' gold, sah," he said, 
solemnly. 

"Yo' has? An' where?" 

"Oh, wunce when Ah swept a dentist's office." 

— The clergyman felt annoyed to find that an old gentleman fell 
asleep during the sermon on two consecutive Sundays. So after 
service finally he asked the boy who accompanied the sleeper into 
the vestry. 

"My boy, who is that elderly gentleman you attend church with?" 

"Grandpa." 

"Well, if you will keep him awake during my sermon I'll give you 
a nickel each week." 

For the next two weeks the old gentleman was very attentive to 
the sermon. The third week, however, found him soundly asleep 
again. 

The vexed clergyman sent for the boy. "Didn't you promise to 
keep him awake if I paid you a nickel a week?" 

"Yes, but grandpa now gives me a dime not to disturb him." 

Sf. If. wfc 

— In a conspicuous place in the parlor of a country hotel was an 
inscription: "Ici on parle Francais." 

The proprietor was asked, "Do you speak French? 

"Not me," the man replied. "United States is good enough for 
me." 

"Why do you have that inscription on the wall, then? That means 
'French is spoken here.' " 

"You don't mean it!" exclaimed the hotelkeeper. "Well, I'll be 
darned! A young chap sold that to me for 'God bless our home ! 



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A Good Sport 

(Ranger Bill Says a Mouthful) 

<•(• f~*\ OOD sports? Sure, there's a heap of them still roaming ihe 
\y woods," said Ranger Bill. "I meet them every summer. Lots 
of them are my friends, too, and I'm mighty glad to do everything I 
can to help them have a pleasant vacation. But when I say 'a good 
sport' I mean a man who always thinks of the ether fellow. He's the 
kind of guy you're sure will live up to the game laws and keep a 
clean camp and won't forget to put out his fire with lots of water 
and earth. Moreover, he doesn't go around the woods flipping burn- 
ing matches and cigarettes into the brush. He knows what would 
happen if he did — less huhting, less fishing, and fewer places for 
sport and pleasure. You don't have to take that kind of a fellow up 
before the judge very often, either. 

"But you can just bet your last cigarette paper that not everyone 
who goes up into the mountains packing a fishing rod or a gun is 'a 
good sport.' Most folks want to be one, and mean to be, too; but 
'bout half way up the trail the first day they meet Old Man Care- 
lessness, and they just can't help taking him along for company. And 
right there's where they make the mistake of their lives. 

"Of course, you know Old Man Carelessness — most everyone does. 
Right about this time of the year, when the deer season is opening, 
you always find him up in the woods. He likes to sit around a 
smouldering campfire after everybody else has gone, and he just 
dotes on burning cigarettes thrown promiscuous into the leaves and 
needles. With his good friends, Mr. Hot Weather and Miss East 
Wind, he can cook up more trouble in an hour than a hundred men 
can undo in a week. His specialty in California is forest fires — he's 
a bear at that. 

"Here I've got fifty-seven different things to do and 200,000 acres 
of prime timber to look after and protect. That's plenty of a job, too, 
but along come a thousand hunters and campers, and half of them 
will have a package of tailor-mades in their pocket. Then it's good- 
bye sleep and most everything else till the fall rains come. Do you 
wonder we. fellows get gray-haired early? 'Tain't the 'good sports 
I worry about; it's the fellows that don't measure up to that stand- 
ard. Well, so long! I've got to get out and ride on fire patrol. Don't 
worry about the deer; they're twice as safe as the trees are during 
the hunting season." 



Continuous reference to Lady Astor as the American peeress is 
distasteful. Her forebears, in foreswearing allegiance to the United 
States when their fortunes had been amassed, inhibits her, out of 
delicacy, from connecting herself with anything American — except 
collecting her rentals, etc. 




HART HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



!rj^' ) 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Miiniifnt lurer* of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS. CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, etc. 

444 Market St. 5517 Santa Fe Ave. 

San Francisco, Calif. I."* Aii£Cl6n, Calif. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August II, 1923 



Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

75/77 Moore- 



San Francisco Class "A" Theater Town. 

When a play, stage or screen, making the 
wide popular appeal, is booked for a run in 
any city, the theatrical rating of that city 
is gauged by the length of time it is going 
to take its people to see the big production. 

At the Alcazar, popular playhouse famous 
in tl^e annals of San Francisco for several 
decades, "Topsy and Eva" a musical drama 
suggested by "Uncle Tom's Cabin" with the 
adorable Duncan Sisters in the title roles, a 
large and competent supporting cast, and an 
excellent orchestral organization, has filled 
the house for five consecutive weeks, with 
no sign of the end yet in sight. 

The Columbia Theatre, where all the best 
visiting productions go, has departed from its 
usual course of the spoken drama, and for 
three weeks has been showing a truly won- 
derful moving picture, "If Winter Comes;" 
fiim version of Hutchinson's famous book. 
In all likelihood this will continue its suc- 
cessful season until the enormous number of 
San Franciscans who patronize the best have 
been able to see the exquisite picture. 

The Imperial Theatre has become the in- 
evitable dwelling-place for long-run pictures, 
and at this theater "The Merry-go-Round," 
has attracted thousands daily and nightly for 
a month, with the numbers undiminished at 
this writing, and no change of bill an- 
nounced. 



Orpkeum All For Fun. 

Harry Breen is one of those comedians 
whose irresistible personality and likable ab- 
surdities win an audience immediately he 
pokes his nose around the edge of the wings, 
and who has a hard time of it trying to 
make his exit, for the whole world dearly 
loves a laugh and the person who can pro- 
duce genuine merriment is for the time being 
the monarch of all he surveys. 

Sophie Tucker is just as popular in her 
second week, in fact a shade more so, than 
when she made her first bow to us. Frisco 
is here again, too, and is well remembered 
and loudly applauded. The Vincent Lopez 
orchestra makes large quantities of merry 
music, the quality thereof being somewhat 
submerged in volume. "The Love Game" is 
an amusing skit, with Harry Hayden, Eloise 
Murray, Lola Norton and Elmer Haynes, por- 
traying its different characters. 

With no desire to disparage the art stand- 
ard of the Vaudeville stage, one cannot keep 
from wondering why so great and disting- 
uished an artist as Kerekjarto, the Slav 
violinist, chose this instead of the concert 
stage for his public work. His playing of 



the most beautiful of all instruments has a 
quality that musicians accept as the high- 
est expression of their art, and both his tem- 
perament and technique are eminently suited 
to concert solo work. In playing to large 
and easily pleased audiences, whose indis- 
criminating applause is more loud than deep, 
Monsieur Kerekjarto is taking a dangerous 
risk; almost, he is selling his birthright for a 
mess of pottage. 

Next week Ethel Barrymore comes to the 
Orpheum in Barrie's delightful whimsicality, 
"The Twelve-Pound Look." 



Granada — "Divorce." 

The film is not an effective way to "put 
ever" a problem play. Let who will re- 
fute that statement, I hold to it. The mat- 
ter of divorce is one of the biggest prob- 
lems society has to deal with just now, 
and of course every one is keenly interested 
in all its phases. The motion picture is the 
medium chosen to reach the largest num- 
ber of people with an idea. Hence we are 
deluged with movie problem plays. It is 
like crushing a butterfly with chariot wheels. 
Leaving generalities and arriving at the play 
in mind, one can only say of "Divorce" now 
showing at the Granada, that it is interest- 
ing, well acted and pleasingly presented. So 
far as solving the big problem, however, it 
may as well never have been written. Jane 
Novak, ethereal, fair, appealing, has a charm- 
ing part as the young wife and mother, while 
John Bowers is a manly, convincing young 
husband and father. Their marital difficul- 
ties, obviously manufactured for a purpose 
by the author, are lightly surmounted in the 
casual manner of the movies, and everything 
is neatly rounded up at the end, leaving us 
with the comfortable assurance that the nice 
joung people will live happy ever after and 
that the horrid old ones will be properly 
wretched forever and ever. What a world, 
what a world, is that constructed for us by 
the mechanical minds of the motion picture 
makers! John Steel, with his ringing tenor 
voice and his dramatic rendition of several 
good songs, made an emphatic hit. Next 
week there comes to the Granada, the film 
version of that popular play, "Three Wise 
Fools" and judging it from the "teasers" 
and Mr. Partington's generous, confidential 
foreword, the story is going to be a huge 
success on the screen. 



California — "The Ragged Edge." 

Motion pictures, like Ancient Gaul, may 
be divided into three parts. Some are good. 
5ome are bad. Some are but indifferent. 



"The Ragged Edge," now on the California 
screen, belongs to the third part. The au- 
thor has made a tremendous effort to lift 
it out of this slough, and the producers have 
come nobly to his assistance, but the cast- 
ing director made several mistakes and the 
play is flat as a pancake. The plot, too, is 
rather silly, and the forced situations, alUhelp 
to reduce things to mediocrity. Alfred Lunt 
has the part of the hero who is running 
wild abcut the world because he took his 
own money away from a cruel stepfather. 
Lunt is a new actor and one who will make 
but slight impressions on the screen's his- 
tory. Mimi Palmeri essays the role of the 
heroine who meets this lad in a Canton hotel 
en an awful spree, or as the title puts it, 
"The Ragged Edge." She sits with him on 
the edge and they both tumble off, at the end 
of a week, into a bog of matrimony. Miss 
Palmeri has large dark eyes and perfectly 
beautiful hands, and that's all there is to 
her. She has not even a remote idea of 
v-hat acting is, and is unfortunately without 
grace, charm, humour and all of those es- 
sentials, those "trifles light as air," without 
which no actress can touch her audience. 
Easter and Hazelton have a new dance act 
this week, an exquisite thing called "The 
Cat and Canary," and a Lloyd Hamilton 
comedy has place on the bill. 



Warfitld Theatre. 

Lovers of animals, the out-of-doors and 
realism in motion picture entertainment will 
be extremely interested in the coming of 
Rintintin, police dog hero of the war, both 
"in person" and to the screen at the War- 
field Theatre, for the week commencing Sat- 
urday, August 1 1 . 

Rir.t ntin in his appearance on the Warfield 
stage will give exhibitions demonstrating his 
almost human intelligence, including the 
jumping of a seven-foot barrier. 

The human players in the cast include 
Claire Adams, one of the most fearless act- 
resses, noted for her daring feats of horse- 
manship, Walter McGrail, Myrtle Owen and 
Pat Hartigan. 

Herb Wiedofet's Cinderella Roof orchestra, 
whose popularity has been instantaneous, will 
have a complete change of program for the 



SAHFRAHCISCO 

m ^i\vioe*iu.% 




\ 



J ®HAmn\.ei\ouX ^ || g 



The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 



MATINEE DAILY 



August II, 1923 

second week of their engagement. These 
clever synco-harmonists have an apprecia- 
tion cf musical good taste in their jazz play- 
ing, and a perfection of rhythm which makes 
their numbers particularly pleasing. 

The Warfield Music Masters, Lipschultz 
conducting, in concert selections and the 
usual varied short reel subjects are other 
program attractions. 



PHELAN MADE CHAIRMAN. 

The election of James D. Phelan as chair- 
man of the Board of Directors of the United 
Bank and Trust Company of California set- 
tles a much mooted question in the financial 
district. Mr. Phelan declined to discuss his 
policies, but taking into consideration his ef- 
ficiency in other positions of much wider and 
complicated scope, there need be no trepida- 
tion on the street that he will ever do any- 
thing to repudiate the great confidence and 
respect that the people in general hold for 
him. 



AT THE BIB AND TUCKER. 

Men of refinement, who appreciate home- 
cooking, will find in the Bib and Tucker, 334 
Sutter Street, a lunch room that will meet 
all their requirements. Especially good are 
the home-made pies in this place, and we 
all know that men have a weakness for "Pies 
like Mother used to make." 



Take This Trip 
Next Sunday — 

Here is the ideal excur- 
sion. "The Yosemite" by 
Rotagravure. No long 
train ride; none of the 
discomforts of travel, 
but, in the comfort of 
your home, view the 
beauties of nature's 
wonderland, as spread 
before you in The 
Chronicle's pictorial sec- 
tion. 

Or Should 
You Prefer 

Travel "Around Eu- 
rope," and become bet- 
ter acquainted with its 
persons of prominence; 
do a little "Looking 
Downward." and see un- 
usual sights from va- 
rious airplanes. and 
"From All Corners" of 
the earth, you will find 
famous persons and fa- 
mous places pieturized 
for your edification, in 
THE 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

THE COOTE FAILURE. 

It now turns out that books of the A. W. 
Coote Brokerage Company are missing and 
that these books break the chain of eyi- 
dence the receiver was trying to make that 
would lay guilt on the management of the 
brokerage firm for manipulating the funds 
of the patrons. The Coote failure was pre- 
cipitated by the failure of a large firm of 
brokers in the East for which the Coote con- 
cern were the agents on the coast. Coote 
had offices at San Francisco and Los An- 
geles and other places and it has been said 
that his dealings amounted in the millions 
of dollars. However that may be, the fact 
remains that he went under, and now the 
receiver comes forward with the statement, 
if one is to believe the daily press, that the 
brokerage firm was insolvent over a year 
ago. 

In addition it is said the broker claims a 
perfect right to speculate with the funds at 
his disposition and the defense is made di- 
rectly by his attorneys that he may not be 
punished for doing that which he had a right 
to do. The losses through speculations are 
placed at hundreds of thousands of dollars. 
The statement of the accountant is taken to 
mean that Coote Speculated with the funds 
derived from loans on securities either left to 
be sold or bought to be delivered by him. It 
it quite doubtful if anyone will ever de- 
rive any benefit through recovery of funds 
but it is imperative that such men or com- 
binations of men, operating bucket shops and 
crooked brokerage houses be punished as se- 
verely as the law allows, as an example to 
others to deter them from the same prac- 
tices. 

In this very serious matter an attempt at 
rehabilitation and a recovery for the credit- 
ors is being made, and it is now the 
idea of the Creditor's Protective Association 
that Receiver W. P. Moore be made the man- 
ager of the newly re-organized company if 
such reorganization takes place. 



LEGION OF HONOR PLACE. 

The collection of California art exhibited 
in the Legion d'Honneur Palace in Paris, 
France, has aroused much interest among 
Europeans in this golden State of ours; so 

ECOTICB TO l RKIHTOKS. 

Estate "f Michael Ma - ! No. 37033 

Dept X". 1". 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
W .i Hynes, administrator "f the estate "f 
I Madden, de< '1 to the creditors pi 
ami all persons having claims against ti- 
nt, to tile them th tin- necessary youch- 
Ithln four HI months after the first pub- 
. the Office "f the c"1erk 

..t" the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City ami County of San Prat 

exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 

Within four v 4 » months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice to the saiii administrator, at 

his office, 868 Phelan Butldii ncteco, 

California Which said last-named office the un- 

place of business in all 
matters connected with said --slate of Michael 
Madden, deceased. 

W. J HYNES, 
Admit the estate of 

Mich: Madden. Deceased. 
Dated San Francis California. August 9. 

ill.t.lNAN' & HI'-KT.- 

Attorneys for Admit ator. 



17 



says Mrs. A. B. Spreckels, who has just re- 
turned from a four months' visit in Europe. 
This collection was presented to Mrs. Spreck- 
els by Mr. Sproule, and she in turn, pre- 
sented it to the French Legion of Honor 
Palace. The California Legion of Honor 
Palace, which Mr. and Mrs. Spreckels are 
erecting in memory of our soldiers, is a re- 
plica of the original and will be a most im- 
posing and inspiring structure, overlooking 
beautiful Land's End. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Pays You 
$500 
a Month 
For Life 



If you are a middle-aged 
business man earning as 
much as $8000 a year, and 
in good physical condition, 
the future value of your in- 
come, based on your expecta- 
tion of life, is $254,240. We 
issue a non-cancellable in- 
come contract for approxi- 
mately $135 a year that will 
guarantee 75 per cent of this 
income, payable at the rate 
of $500 a month as long as 
you live and are unable to 
work. 

Covers every form of dis- 
ability both mental and 
physical. 

Issued by a company fifty- 
four years old with assets 
over sixty million dollars. 

If interested, fill out and send 
attached coupon 

PACIFIC MUTUAL LIFE INSUR- 
ANCE COMPANY, 

P. .\. Steams, Manager Accident De- 
partment. 155 Montgomery Street. 
San Francisco, California. 

Nam- 

Age 

Address 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August II, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service mid Storage 

of Automobiles 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 

FREE 

In a high class Photo Lahorntory 

If purchased at Leboirc & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 580 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



Quality 1866-66 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Uurlinffame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodside 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works : 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francit.ee Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 



Telephone Market 64 



San Francisco 




know," said the first. "I'm not sure whether 
I convince him, or only make him tired." 



Lincoln Way In Utah Reported Excellent. 

Until recently the condition of the Good- 
year Cut-off across the great Salt Lake Des- 
ert between here and Salt Lake City on 
the Lincoln Highway has been very rough 
and, when the weather has been wet, ex- 
tremely difficult to traverse. However, the 
work has been accomplished by volunteers 
from Gold Hill and White Pine County. The 
road is now in very good shape, consider- 
ing the fact that it has had no maintenance 
from the State of Utah since 1919 and has 
been abandoned by the present administra- 
tion. 

A tourist arriving in Ely yesterday from 
Salt Lake City had made the drive of 250 
miles in seven hours and forty-two min- 
utes — an average speed of nearly thirty-four 
miles per hour. While the Goodyear sec- 
tion across the Great Salt Lake Desert com- 
prises but 1 7 miles of the 250 between Salt 
Lake City and Ely, nevertheless, such ex- 
cellent average time could not be possible 
unless that section were -in fair condition, 
causing no delay to the motorist. 



Ten Commandments of Safety 

1. Always remember you are an engineer, 
fully responsible. 

2. Always test your brakes when starting; 
and have them inspected frequently. 

3. Never pass a street car when it is stop- 
ping, or, if the law permits, proceed very 
slowly past it, at the legal distance. 

4. Exercise especial care in crossing in 
front of a street car or in passing it, as you 
cannot tell what may be coming on the 
other side. 

5. Always signal with hand when slow- 
ing down, turning, or stopping, even though 
you have an automatic or mechanical warn- 
ing device. 

6. Look before you back, and sound the 
horn three times. 

7. Try to drive with using the horn as 
little as possible. A sudden noise may stop 
pedestrians in their tracks rather than warn 
them. 

8. Don't count too much on the common 
sense of the other fellow. No one is 100 
per cent alert all the time. 

9. Drive slowly in streets where children 
are playing. Remember your own child- 
hood. 

10. Cross crossings cautiously. Warning bells 
may be out of order, watchmen or gate op- 
erators may be off duty. Trains cannot stop 
as quickly as you can. Shift into second to 
avoid stalling on tracks. 



Two men who were "something in the 
city were lunching at their club one day. 
Oh," said one, "my partner formerly used 
always to oppose my views, but now he 
agrees with me in everything." "How do 
you account for it?" asked the other. "Don't 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 




me * 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
Ihe new HEXEON ' 
process. A 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1056 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT DEBT SERVES THE PUBLIC 
REST SERVES CS 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

ST1MMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Elect ric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin S685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmlthlng 



II. W. Culver 



M. Daberer 



15. JobnHon 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gonfh 
Telephone Park 271 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




Practice limited to 


EYE, 


EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 


Hours 
Saturday 


10 to 5 — By Appointment — 
10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Removed to Suite 5S7 Llebes Bids*. 




177 POST STREET 
San FraneUco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Prensed by Hand. Ouly — 
Sultft Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleanlnr 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Clovers 

"Made a little better than seems neceaaary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold in similar boxes containing; one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
S7-45 First Street - - San Pranctoco 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 8S5 

SPECIALISTS — F.itractlons; Clown; 
Self Cleansing Bridres; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
466 Geary Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Brofcer 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

Plione Kearny 391 San Francisco 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 695 Douglas 4772 

Perpetual Care Fund 

On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC 
COMPANY. 

36th Consecutive Quarterly Dividend on 
First Preferred Stock. 

THE regular dividend, tor the three 
months ending July 31st, 1923, at the 
rate of $1.50 per share for the full quar- 
ter, upon the full-paid First Preferred Cap- 
ital Stock of the Company, will be paid on 
August 15th, 1923, to shareholders of rec- 
ord at the end of the quarterly period. 
Checks will be mailed in time to reach 
stockholders on the date they are payable. 
A. F. HOCKENBEAMER, 
Vice-President and Treasurer 
San Francisco, California. 



WALNUT 
ORCHARD 

For Sale 
26 ACRES 

1000 Franquette and Mayette Walnuts 
9 years old 



6 miles from San Jose 



$750 Per Acre 



Address, P. M., Owner 
382 Russ Building, San Francisco 



n 






Hotel Oakland 

abounds in a wealth of 
social activity. As a 
place to entertain, 
whether your guests 
number one, two or 
many, it is THE ideal 
place. 

Dancing Wednesday 
and Saturday evenings. 
Dinner dances every 
Saturday. 



m O T E 

>AKLA$ 

i^-W.C. JurQervs Mqk 




HOTEL PLA7A 

JAN FRANCISCO 



65c 

Luncheon 



Good food, quiet pleasant 
surroundings and carefu' 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 





Happy are the men 
who start the day 



with- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Telephone Direct 
Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International Exposition. 




(5j{ospitalHy h 



whole- 
hearted interest in 
one's guests. 

Tea in the Palm Court com- 
bined with the enjoyment 
of the new tea concerts 
under the direction of 
Cy Trobbe insures for the 
discriminating hostess un- 
usual satisfaction. 

— Afternoon Tea, JiQ cents 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

KiAianagemen t~ 
HALSEY L.MANWARJNO 1 



Established July 20, 185U 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertis 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 



Jrom the fainting 

by 

Charles 'Dickman 




flight in the 
1{edwoods: 
Bohemian Grove, 
on the 
Ityssian 9^/Vct 



1 Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 
WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



,105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haipht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4^) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annuaily as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable, can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be sent you on request. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 
Two Wall 
street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

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Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CHI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, AUGUST 18, 1923 



No. 7 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco. 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhiil. E. C, England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— We all have our "secret orchards"; but sometimes they bear 
bitter fruit. 

— When we begin to reform ourselves, we will not have to reform 
the other fellow. 

— If you read it in the News Letter, it may not always be so — we 
aren't infallible, but it is always readable! 

Sfi ffi if, 

— "California women cannot compare to New York women in 
regard to culture," remarked a woman who is consistently bad- 
mannered. 

* ¥ * 

— We trust our New England President will not try to add to 
the long list of "blue laws" that have already burdened the one- 
time "land of the free." 

— "Warren Harding never forgot that he was a man," says one 
admirer. We have never found that unself-consciousness was a 

characteristic of men. We wish it were, occasionally. 

* * * 

— After reading the colorful verbiage of the press on the late la- 
mented, we have come to the conclusion that, after all, sentimen- 
talism is not altogether eliminated by realism, even in this age of 

pragmatism. 

* •¥ * 

— What an exploded theory it is, that America is the most "com- 
mercial" country! What was this last European carnage, if it 
wasn't "commercial" — and they are still slaughtering each other over 

there, for "reparations." 

* * # 

— Hydrophobia, some centuries ago, was treated by compounds 
made from the livers of mad dogs, and recipes composed of "cray- 
fish eyes"; we shudder when we read this, and then we come across 
a sign in a drug store window extolling the virtues of goat glands 

for senility. 

* * * 

—There seems to be considerable trouble in naming the new pen- 
insula highway, and the usual lamentable lack of imagination dis- 
played in choosing a cognomen. We think that the "Highway of 
Helios" would not be a misnomer. It has to do with heaven, 
(though it don't sound that way) and the sun, and Greek chariots. 



— A friend was describing an Eastern trip she had just taken. "Chi- 
cago, monstrous city as it is, has splendid traffic laws," she said; 
"hardly ever do you see any congestion, even in its busiest districts; 
but then, of course, it has adopted one-way streets, and that, in itself, 
solves the traffic problem." When is San Francisco going to ap- 
ply this remedy to our bewildering and ever-increasing traffic ques- 
tion? 

— Some people have never seen the danger of the "open door" 
situation. "What does it matter if the Orientals keep to them- 
selves, and we do not intermarry?" they have asked. Just the other 
evening in a certain cafe on Grant avenue we watched a party of 
Americanized Chinese boys approach a chaperon of a group of 
quite "nice" American girls, and persistently insinuate themselves into 
her good graces. The affair ended with dancing and the exchange 
of cards. 

— We are now getting the figures of paper money of certain 
countries in "trillions" of their respective units of currency. The 
latest reports quote the German circulation at nearly thirty-two trill- 
ions of marks; Austria over five trillion crown; Poland over three 
trillion Polish marks, while Soviet Russia has long since passed the 
trillion line, and the latest advices put the total of outstanding Sov- 
iet currency at more than four quadrillion paper rubles (4,482,800,- 
000,000,000.) The poorer these countries become, the more (worth- 
less) money they have! 

— We have again to call attention to what we cannot consider 
otherwise than the merest boorishness on the part of the yellow 
press here. Ethel Burrymore comes and refuses, in pursuance of a 
long tried policy which she has proved, to be interviewed. There- 
upon, the paper angry at the refusal, callously and brutally prints 
the story of her troubled life, and with hideously bad taste actually 
details the physical injuries received at the hands of the husband 
from whom she divorced. Congo savages have been known to do 
much better than that, but the Hearst papers are always orang- 
outang. 

* * * 

— Now there will be a storm. A beauty from Hollywood, re- 
joicing in the name of Princess Thais Valdemar, which, as a name, 
has a somewhat fictional sound, but concerning whose beauty .here 
is no doubt at all, says that the sole recipe for beauty is goodness and 
laziness. She cuts cut men. tobacco, alcohol and all meat, except 
lamb. But she is beautiful and expects to last ten years as a beauty, 
if she keeps up her routine. But what is there in being beautiful un- 
der such conditions? The recipe for piety which is balked at so 
often and so successfully is not more onerous than that for beauty on 
these terms. Beauty, as a cult, will have few followers when die 
price is understood. And yet this exotic sounding filmist is prob- 
ably right and beauty, like any other quality, demands sacrifices. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 




community and that necessity for economy which is so difficult for 
officials to appreciate. Of course the expense is heavy, and the re- 
turns, particularly as regards the condition of the streets and the 
police service, are not by any means all we should expect for so 
much. 



So we have a new chief; now that the last echoes 
Ave Imperatoi of the funeral marches have ebbed into the silence 
we are brought face to face with the fact. It has 
all been accomplished with such smoothness and so, as it were, in- 
tangibly that we are, as yet, hardly conscious of what has hap- 
pened. Here, without a disturbance of the daily life, there has come 
a new commander of the army and navy and the chair is occupied 
by a new figure which wields more individual power than any other 
ruler in the world. Our president is more of the autocrat, as a ruler 
than any other ruler today, even the president of Mexico, and in- 
comparably more than the president of France, and still more than 
the king of England or the king of Italy. 

And so the personality of our president is important, not as a 
social function or as a conductor of political electricity, like the 
British and Italian kings, but as a leader, as one who to some ex- 
tent, at least, brandishes in his hands the thunderbolts of Jove 
and can hurt or bless. So far we have had on the whole great luck. 
We have had presidents who were not as wise as they should have 
been. We have had a fair proportion of nonentities and we have 
had, perhaps, more than our fair share of men of talent and energy. 
Out of the list there are at least three overshadowingly great men 
and that is enough for the time of our duration. It takes a little 
while to recover from a great president. And now we have a 
new president. Of him we know not very much, for he has had 
a successful political career unmarked by anything spectacular and 
strange. He is a typical New Englander with much of the austerity 
of his people and a reputation for silence, which may or may not 
conceal the absolutely indispensable sympathy. That sympathy 
the president of these United States must have. Wilson lost out 
because people thought that he lacked it. To have it, as Warren 
Harding did, is to open the pathway of love and to cause the peo- 
ple to forget many lapses. To have it not is to be damned from 
the start. 

And we salute our new president, our imperator, the man in 
whose name the country will act during the interval till the next 
election. We wish him all success and pray for peace and pros- 
perity under his guiding hand. 



All over the country there has been a cry raised 
The Cost Of that the cost of local government, both munic- 

City Government ipal and state has reached colossal proportions. 

The report of the Finance Committee of this 
city and county shows that we have to pay a tidy sum here in order 
to do what has to be done in our municipality. The total cost for the 
year is estimated, and carefully estimated, we admit, at $25,563,302. 
That is a great deal of money and in order to raise it, there will be 
a tax rate of $3.47, the current rate for the ensuing year. We are 
lucky that it has not been raised, for in many municipalities there 
has been a distinct raise over the year which has just gone. In 
Oakland the raise has been very notable. An additional $1,600,000 
for improvements has been furnished by the revenues of the Hetch 
Hetchy railways and power plant, part of which is used in pay- 
ment of interest on outstanding bonds for the Hetch Hetchy project, 
these funds having been accumulating in the city treasury. On the 
whole, there does not appear to be much to criticize in the proposals 
as published. All the departments of the government appear to 
be working in harmony and with due attention to the needs of the 



There is some perplexity as to the actual condition 
The Economic of matters industrial and the continuance of the de- 
Situafion velopment which has been so marked during the 

past months. There is no doubt that the stock mar- 
ket is uncertain and that the leading industrials are not holding the 
place which they have hitherto occupied. Buying power is noted in 
the economic papers as being weak. The New York "Journal of 
Commerce" considers the oil and steel situation to be unsatisfactory 
and seems to think that the future of steel and oil is uncertain. 
Thus it says, "There is general doubt as to the prospects for contin- 
uation of steel activity upon its present basis, reports being to the 
effect that a good many furnaces were in danger of being 'blown 
out.' The oil situation is also confused and uncertain, due to the 
gradual and tardy decline in oil prices and the apparent continu- 
ance of over-production." There is a certain yielding of copper, too, 
Probably this is due to sympathy with the oil and steel decline. The 
resultant effect upon the mind of the said paper and its general 
conclusions are as follows: "Without doubt business is steadily, if 
slowly becoming less active and demand for short time funds small- 
er." But all agree "that there is no 'breakdown' immediately in 
prospect." This is about the truth, that the great .and stimulated 
demand for commodities is already being satisfied, but that there 
is a sound and permanent basis. 



The League of Nations papers in the East are 
Johnson Joshed joshing Hiram Johnson unmercifully and the bur- 
den of their laughter is that Hiram is too humble. 
Now, they can say a great deal about Hiram that we can agree with, 
we might even be able to say quite a little ourselves, because we are 
more familiar with some of his vagaries than our Eastern friends. 
But he is really not humble and nobody, not even himself, ever 
pretends that he is. It is true that he used the expression, "in my 
humble fashion," and "my feeble warning." But surely the East- 
erners are not so infantile as to take such expressions at their face 
value. He kept quiet in Europe, he says nothing that is not plat- 
itudinous, but then he never did. The Bull Moose Party from 
its illustrious founder down was a platitudinous party. Hiram is 
not humble; he is just running true to form. But why did he not 
speak in Europe? How could he? He is provincialism incarnate, 
and the dust of Sacramento sticks in his throat. It was not hu- 
mility that made Hiram silent; Hiram is not humble. But he is sly; 
"devilish sly," and he must know which way the cat is going to 
jump. When the cat has jumped and public opinion is obvious, 
Hiram won't be humble. 



A writer who usually gives evidence of good 
A Foolish Analogy sense and whose ideas are well worthwhile, 

as a rule, is ridden by the idea of the World 
Court and the League of Nations until he cannot see the good from 
the bad and becomes quite impossible as a guide to correct think- 
ing. He says among other things in a recent weekly: "There 
is now no more divergence in many of the essential interests of 
France, Great Britain, and the United States than there was then 
(at the time of the revolution), in many of the interests of Maine, 
Maryland and South Carolina." Now, of course, without saying so, 
he wants us to understand that France and England are as regards 
their material interests as close as the States in question. He does 
not say so, covering himself with the words "many" and "essential." 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



This is unfair, almost shystering on the question. Let us be frank. 
There are competitive interests between France and England that 
go down to the basis of things. The League of Nations was made 
to endeavor to reconcile those interests, without the test of war. Does 
it look as if it was going to be done? On the contrary, does it not 
look as if those interests are going to leap into the arena and fight 
it out. League of Nations or no League of Nations? But the United 
States has no such interests, it is urged. Perfectly so, and therefore, 
one or the other will intrigue to get the force of the United States 
behind either one of the contending parties and there will ensue a 
world of log rolling and intriguing. That won't do for us— even 
"splendid or ignominious isolation" is better for us than that. That 
writer must try again. 



A proposal for the incorporation of 
A Greater San Francisco northern San Mateo County with San 
Francisco has been made by the Three 
Cities Chamber of Commerce. The advantages of the annexation 
of the Peninsula cities into a Greater San Francisco are easy to 
be seen. The growth that would come with a consolidation of what 
is now separate municipal units into one dominate unit would carry 
with it the opportunity for development of every individual and every 
enterprise in the consolidated area. The experience of Greater New 
York, Greater Los Angeles and many other communities has proven 
it. San Francisco must have more territory to meet the demand ac- 
tuated by the pressure of industrial development and population 
growth. , ,j 

The Peninsula cities need San Francisco and San Francisco needs 
the Peninsula cities. The transportation problem on the Peninsula 
has for a long time been acute. The thing that will count most 
in bringing the Peninsula forward, and the thing that will continue 
to count most in the years to come is embodied in the word "trans- 
portation." One of the great advantages to be gained by the pro- 
posed merger, would be the extension of rapid street car transpor- 
tation into this territory. The development of the peninsula, in com- 
mon with the development of the City, has been handicapped by a 
lack of this essential service. One of the cardinal demands made 
by the Peninsula people in the event of the merger with San Fran- 
cisco, is that San Francisco extend her street car system into the Pen- 
insula so that its citizens could be carried from their homes and 
business in comfort, time and safety. 

In order to extend transportation to the Peninsula cities it would 
be necessary to have a unified system here in the city, for only un- 
der a unified management and control could these extensions be 
made without needless duplication, corresponding needless expense 
and indirect, roundabout routes. A unified street car system under 
city ownership and control would not only make possible these ex- 
tensions, but would be of tremendous benefit to our citizens gener- 
ally. It would result immediately in shorter and more direct routes 
and extensions where needed. The cars on Market street could be re- 
routed, thus relieving the intolerable traffic conditions on our main 
thoroughfare. With universal transfers, good from all lines to all 
lines, the street car-riding public could reach its destination more 
quickly, more directly and on a single fare. 



The job of being President of these United 
The Modern Atlas States, according to a local paper, is becoming 

an unbearable position; the ever-dilating re- 
quirements of the office have undermined the health of our latter 
Presidents. To quote: "President McKinley died weary of it. 
President Roosevelt, vigorous man that he was, undermined his vi- 
tality in response to the duties of his office. President Taft labored 
through it, but retired from office none too soon to save his vital 



powers. President Wilson was broken by it, and lives on, a physical 
wreck. President Harding has been killed by it." 

There is no question as regards the multiplication of interests of 
this government, since its inception as a nation, the ever-increasing 
services exacted from the head of this great country; but we must rise 
to remark that our contemporary fails to record the facts that Mc- 
Kinley was assassinated, dying, as we remember it, almost imme- 
diately, and that Roosevelt, in spite of a bullet fired into his chest, 
lived on for several years, after an attack that would have killed 
an ordinary man. President Taft, from his latest photographs, 
appears as fat and smiling as ever, after serving the term of his 
disappointing (to his mentor) reign; none the worse, as far as the 
casual observer can see, for his experience. Only Wilson and Hard- 
ing have really reaped the desolate harvest directly consequent upon 
the emergence of our United States from her period of "splendid 
isolation." 

For nearly a century and a half (134 years, to be exact), we 
have existed and prospered, as a nation — young; j rich, proud, gen- 
erous, independent, open-hearted, free of all-chose hates which com- 
pel into being the international intrigues (otherwise international 
lies and deceit, and thieveries and murders) of the European coun- 
tries. 

Suddenly, a flaming torch is kindled in the hands of a half-mad 
boy, who kills a couple of superfluous and unloved Royalties in a 
little unimportant European kingdom, which in turn, fires half the 
world into a fiery caldron of hellish slaughter. Bewildering and de- 
ceitful propaganda is circulated by a subsidized press, and we are 
hurled into the maelstrom, against our will and the dictates of the 
Constitution of the United States. (Amendment XIII, Sectiion I: 
"Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as punishment for 
crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall ex- 
ist within the United States or any place subject to their jurisdic- 
tion.") 

The human being who can use a little gray matter, knows that 
this "half-mad boy" was merely used as a tool, as an excuse for 
a commercially jealous nation to fly at the throat of its opponent; 
that its opponent, being the cleverest country in the world, in- 
trigues half the world to fight for it, and that during the last de- 
cade it has inveigled its offspring into an affiliation that may event- 
ually smother it, as a nation, just as mothers have (unconsciously?) 
smothered their sleeping babes. 

Out of this complicated situation there arises an ambition in the 
brains of our Presidency (palavered upon by European diplomats) 
to take upon its shoulders the political problems of countries that 
it would take us centuries to really understand; involving race 
hatreds and ancient wrongs which our young nation is incapable 
of experiencing, no doubt to a great extent, through fortunate geo- 
graphical location and almost inexhaustible natural advantages. 
When the thinking public comes to the conclusion that Europe has no 
need of our wisdom (?) — in fact, scorns it; that her only want is 
cur millions and men, will our country be in a position to slip 
back into the "isolation" that is its safety? Can the modern Atlas 
then shake from its shoulders the burden of the world? 



— Why has willful failure to provide for abandoned children 
dropped from a felony to a misdemeanor? In our opinion a man 
who willfully abandons and refuses to support his children is at 
least prima facie a bad man, and has a depraved heart. It is a 
much worse offense than many offenses due to passion and sud- 
den attacks of emotion, which carry heavy penalties. To leave one's 
child to starve is a very dreadful thing and society should mark 
its disapproval of such behavior by making it a felony. We can- 
not understand the last legislature in this matter. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 



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Stars That Have Swung Into Our Orbit 




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By AN OLD THEATER-GOER 




ENGLAND sent us one of her favourites and fine- actors in the per- 
son of Walter Montgomery, who came to the California in May 
1870, choosing Hamlet for his first part. It was very good, but 
his Louis XI was great, and his engagement was a big success. A 
great crowd greeted Frank Chanfrou when he came with Sam in 
September, 1870, and Kit proved equally attractive and enjoyable. 

January 1874, brought us Boucicault, actor and dramatist of in- 
numerable plays. He gave a round of his best known characters to 
very large houses, but the gem of all and the one that took best was 
Kerry, a little one-act play, which it seemed, audiences could never 
have enough of. When he paid San Francisco his second visit in 
July, 1875, he brought with him his newest Irish play. The Shaugh- 
raun, he playing Conn, Harry Montague, Captain Molyneux, and 
Delia Bateman was Claire Folliett. It was an immense success and 
ran through the whole of his engagement. 

Adelaide Neilson dawned upon our horizon in March, 1874, in her 
great impersonation of Juliet. Miss Neilson was a beauty, and per- 
haps what was remarkable about her was that she was prettier off the 
stage than on it, and so great was the desire to see her that musicians 
were banished to play under the stage while the orchestra was filled 
with seats during the greater part of her engagement. As Juliet she 
had the support of Lewis Morrison as Romeo, Mrs. Judah playing the 
part of Nurse, and Miss Ne;lson paid her the compliment of saying 
that she was the very best nurse she ever played with. Miss Neilson 
paid her second visit to San Francisco in 1877, producing Cymbeline 
and Measure for Measure, two of Shakespeare's plays as yet quite 
unknown to the boards of San Francisco theaters. 

Adelaide Neilson and Clara Morris had one gift in common — they 
could both cry at will, not stage tears, but regular big drops rolling 
down their faces, and then in a second, were laughing as heartily as 
though such a thing as sorrow was quite unknown. It is said that 
Miss Neilson was obliged to have the robe she wore in Measure for 
Measure replaced three times during the run of that play, each of 
them being quite ruined by the tears she shed falling on them. 

McCullough was very anxious to have Sothern, who at this time 
was creating quite a furore in New York with his Lord Dundreary, 
come to the California, but was a little dubious as to Sothern's suc- 
cess in San Francisco. Sothern had said to him: "My terms are five 
hundred dollars a night, and old friends as we are, John, I shall 
exact a guarantee that I be paid." fit last McCcllough decided to 
take the risk. Sothern came, and the result was the most overwhelm- 
ing success on the part of Sothern. The whole State seemed anxious 
to see him in Jiis ridiculous part of Lord Dundreary. The engage- 
ment was for four weeks, the usual time when one came by steam- 
er, and he had crowded houses until the last. He opened of course 
in Lord Dundreary, which ran all the first week — the second week 
was given to "Brother Sam," Ecrrrth.'p™ iu'te different from the 
Sam of Wheatleigh and Chanfrou, the third week to David Garrick 
and the fourth to all three of them. His engagement was the greatest 
success so far that the California theater had known. Mr. Sothern 
came again in 1877, repeating Lord Dundreary, and giving Robert- 
son's Home, and The Hornet's Nest, during his three weeks' engage- 
ment. 

Charles Fechter came to us in June, 1874, and played Hamlet in 
a blond wig. His Hamlet was liked, but he made a better impression 
and pleased more in Ruy Bias, as Don Caesar De Baban, and better 



still, as Obenreizer, in No Thoroughfare, than in his Shakespearean 
representations. It has often been questioned should a foreigner at- 
tempt Shakespeare, especially play Hamlet in English. No matter 
how good their English may be, there is always a defective pro- 
nunciation that spoils the ensemble. David P. Bandman was the first 
who did so in San Francisco. He was well received, and his concep- 
tion of the character of Hamlet was good. But his Narcisse was far 
better liked, and his Old Corporal best of all. 

Clara Morris, the greatest of American emotional actresses, ap- 
peared at the California in January 1875. She chose Camille for 
her opening play, then Article 47, The Sphynx, and others followed. 
All of them pleased, but Alixe proved the greatest success of them all. 
Men were observed to furtively dry their eyes, while tears rolled down 
the cheeks of nearly all the women in the audience. This one was 
only the first of the many visits paid us by Miss Morris, each one 
proving more successful, if possible, than the previous one. 

About this time (1875), Companies from the East began to come 
each year, and with them many who afterwards won stellar honors. 
These were. The Hooley Troupe, the Madison Square Company, 




Adelaide Neilson and Mrs. Judah as "Juliet" and Nurse in 
"Romeo and Juliet," at California Theater, 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Daly's Fifth Avenue Theater Company, The Union Square Company. 
Frohman's Lyceum Theater Company, A. M. Palmer's Company, etc. 
It was with these companies that John Drew, Maurice Barrymore, 
Henry Miller. Herbert Kelcey, William Faversham, Fred De Belville, 
Fanny Davenport, Ada Rehan, Georgie Cayvan, Jeffreys Lewis, 
Blanche Bates, Georgie Drew, Maud Adams, Effie Shannon and 
others, made their first bow to San Francisco audiences. 

The return of old stock favourites as stars, with plays of their 
own, were enthusiastically greeted. Among them were Frank Mayo, 
with Davy Crockett in July, 1874, John T. Raymond with Colonel 
Sellers, in 1876, Charley Thorne with the Danicheffs, in 1877, and 
Williamson and Maggie Moore in Struck Oil, 1877, also. 

When Madame Ristori came, she brought her own company with 
her, therefore Italian was the language in which her plays were given. 
Her first appearance was at Maguire's New Theatre in Elizabeth, in 
June, 1875. She, herself, was magnificent, especially in the last 
act, but her company were more like automatons than human be- 
ings. They all stood at "attention," and when any of them had any- 
thing to say, he, or she, came forward and spoke their piece like a 
child at school examination, and with elbow placed firmly at the 
side, the rest of the arm moved back and forth as if by machinery. 
Then, the speaker, having finished what was to be said, stepped 
backward to his original stand. However, they did better in some 
of the other plays that followed — Marie Antoinette, Judith, Phe- 
dra, etc. Ristori was magnificent in them all, and gave the greatest 
pleasure even to those who did not understand a word that she said; 
her acting was simply sufficient. 

England's greatest stage beauty — Mrs. Scott Siddons-- a great- 
grand niece of the great Sarah Siddons — scarcely equalled expecta- 
tions in her rendition of Rosalind at the California in February, 
1876. She was undisputably a beauty, but not a great actress; in 
fact, rather a poor one, tho as Pauline in the i.ady of Lyons, she did 
better, and in King Renes' Daughter, best of all. But as a reader, 
she was at her best, and it was a delight to listen to her in the several 
recitations she gave. 

Baldwin's Theater was opened to the public in March, 1876, and 
Barry Sullivan then made his first appearance before a San Fran- 
cisco audience, in Richard the Third, followed by Hamlet, Rich- 
elieu, MacBeth and others. He was liked in all these characters, but 
of them all, Hamlet was the one which pleased most. 

Intense was the excitement caused by the appearance here of 
George Rignold in Henry the Fifth. He was under engagement to the 
California Theater, to present that play, but being offered greater in- 
ducements to break it, and transfer the play and himself to the 
Grand Opera House, he did so, and appeared there in May, 1876. 
He not only looked the character, but played it so perfectly that the 
play ran during the whole of his engagement of four weeks. Mean- 
while, the California Theater desired to not be left out in the cold, so 
telegraphed for Barrett to fill the role of Henry at that house, and he 
came by what was called The Lightning Express Train, arriving here 
in four and a half days, something then quite wonderful. There was, 
of course, great rivalry between the two theaters. That Barrett played 
the part of King Henry well, goes without saying, but in comparison 
to Rignold, he did not shine with great lustre, and so the play at the 
California was withdrawn and Barrett played some of his favourite 
characters during the rest of his stay. The speed made by the ex- 
press train was the talk of the hour. It rounded curves at such a 
high rate of speed that Barrett, who was a very nervous man. de- 
clared that rather than return in the same way he'd walk! 

Mary Andersen played an engagement at the California in Au- 
gust. 1876, opening with a round of plays that had not been here for 
twenty years or more. These were Evadne, Fazio and Parthenia. fol- 
lowed by The Lady of Lyons, and Meg Merrilles. She had not yet 
attained the height of her fame as an actress, and if the truth be 



told, she did not create any great enthusiasm and was rather harshly 
criticized. 

After an absence of twenty years, Edwin Booth returned to San 
Francisco in September, 1876, as a star of the first magnitude and 
he received an ovation as Hamlet the night of his first appearance. 
His other presentations — Richelieu and Iago, to the Othello of Mc- 
Cullough, the two exchanging characters the next night — Richard 
Second, Lear, The Fool's Revenge, Shylock, Marc Antony, Brutus, 
Petrucio and others during the four weeks of his engagement. It was, 
however, remarked by those who had seen him in New York, that his 
Hamlet seemed lacking in spirit, and he appeared to be tired and in- 
different. 



Announcement 




San Francisco Law School 

74 New Montgomery St., Third Floor, Call Building 

FOUR-YEAR COURSE 
EVENING SESSIONS 

FOR 

MEN AND WOMEN 

CLASSES CONVENE 
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER FIFTH 

THE SECRETARY WILL BE AT THE 

OFFICE EVERY EVENING 6:45 TO 8:00 

EXCEPTING SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

Telephone For Appointment At 
Other Times — Kearny 4251 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea fiom 3 to 5 



'A^*d7v° 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

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Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



at 



PAUL ELDER'S 



AND PAUL ELDERS LIBRARY 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 



waWVejyou 



— He had been out of a job for a considerable time. One day 
he noticed in the local newspaper an advertisement for an engine- 
driver. He had, in the course of a migratory career, assisted 
a friend for a fortnight in the conduct of a donkey engine on a 
coasting steamer, and was convinced that his experience would prove 
equal to the occasion. So he applied for the vacant situation. "Do 
you thoroughly understand engines?" asked the railway foreman 
when he presented himself. "Oh, yes," he confidently replied. "Well," 
said the foreman, pointing to an engine in a siding, "take her into 
yon shed." "Very well, sir," he replied. When he got on board he 
examined the various cranks with interest and uncertainty. He 
turned one of them, and the engine started for the shed at the rate of 
seventy miles an hour. He was alarmed, and at random turned two 
or three other cranks. There was a sudden jerk, and the engine 
flew in the other direction. Fortunately the lines were clear. For 
the succeeding ten minutes the foreman witnessed a series of man- 
oeuvres. To and from the shed rushed the engine as one pos- 
sessed. As it wended its career on to the main line for the fourth 
time he shouted: "What in the world are you doing, you silly ass?" 
And a voice rang out from the distance, "It's you that's the silly ass. 
Why don't you shut the door of the shed? I've had her in three 
times." 



— A girl, a great lover of nature, went to the seashore for a holiday 
and approaching a typical fisherman, said: 

"Ah, sir, how well you must know the face of nature, and know 
it in all its moods! Have you ever seen the sun sinking in such a 
glare of glory that it swallowed up the horizon with fire? Have you 
not seen the mist gliding down the hilltop like a spectre? Have you 
never," she went on impassionately, "seen the moon struggling to 
shake off the grip of the ragged, rugged storm clouds?" 

"No, miss," responded the fisherman, "I used to see them things, 
but not since prohibition." 



— A landlord in a certain town is not very cordially welcomed on 
Monday mornings when he comes to collect the rents. One morning 
a tenant in one of the houses handed him a dollar towards the 
rent. "Is that all you've got for me, and you so much in arrears?" 
he asked with a scowl. "Go on now and be satisfied," was the re- 
ply. "You wouldn't have had that only my old man has been and 
sold the back door." 



— A navvy was digging by the side of the road when an elderly 
gentleman of an inquiring turn of mind stopped to speak to him. 
"Well, my man," he began, "and what are you digging for?" 
"Money!" snapped out the navvy, as he paused for a moment in his 
work. "Indeed," came the astonished reply, "and when do you ex- 
pect to find it?" "Saturday morning, you p;rishin' ole fule," re- 
torted the man. 



— A certain well-known professor, who is very popular among the 
students, was entertaining some of them at his house one evening. 
Taking down a magnificent sword that hung over the fireplace, he 
brandished it about, exclaiming, "never will I forget the day I drew 
this blade for the first time." "Where did you draw it, sir?" in- 
quired an awe-struck freshman. "At a raffle," was the quiet 
reply. 




ISy REM 

"I make no doubt but it shall often befall me to speak 
of things, which are better, and with more truth, 
handled of such as their craftsmasters." — Montaigne, 
"On Bookes." 

Discussions as to the season's most popular fictional heroines 
has discovered one publisher boasting proudly of having furnished 
four of the most popular ones, namely: 

* * * 

Thursday Hardtripp, the heroine of Edward O. Booth's, "THE 
TREE OF THE GARDEN." She is often compared to Hardy's Tess. 
One sees her first as the pathetic, unkempt child of a boorish, 
drunken father, her face expressionless except for "the tenacious, 
obstinate appeal" of wonderful dark eyes, and while long after read- 
ing this well-written novel — the other characters seem to recede into 
shadowy figures — Thursday stands out in memory as "a shy, wild 
pastoral thing, welcoming love to her whole heart, patiently enduring 
the lash of misfortune; our heroine can be glorified by her loyalty 
to her lover." $2.00. 

The second heroine shines out in Zona Gale's last novel, "FAINT 
PERFUME," as an individual personality and you see her as a "fig- 
ure of charming delicacy . . . flinching under life's duress, but 
brave to meet the love that transforms her world." This is Leda Per- 
rin of whom it is said, "\ou're what a man wants. You're woman- 
love, and more." $1.75. 

* * * 

The third is very realistically named "Pidge Musser" and is the 
radiant, blue-eyed, auburn-haired young lady who illumines the pages 
of "THE PUBLIC SQUARE," by Will Levington Comfort, and we 
are shown that she is "of finer stuff than the usual girl working her 
way in the modern city," and this is proved by the manner in which 
she handles the difficult problem of her two unusual love affairs. 

The publishers have a right to be proud of these heroines, and we 
must not forget the fourth and most highly-developed one — Madame 
Claire, in the charming novel of the same name. $2.00. 

The foregoing are all published by Appleton & Co. 



Attractive Apartment 
TO LET 

Four sunny outside rooms. Unfurnished. 
Every modern convenience. Hardwood 
floors. Centrally located. 940 Jones St., 
near Bush. References required. 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY- 

NEW YORK 



^ "The Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 



FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




TOWNJpjLCRIER 



} WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 
, ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 

j pevil,sidwith your 
— Shakspeare. , 



—A local army officer with whom I was talking the other day 
about Bergdoll killing his would-be kidnaper remarked that it was 
a strange fact that slackers and conscientious objectors were by 
no means as a rule deficient in physical courage. He instanced the 
Quakers who undertook the difficult and dangerous work of mine 
sweeping. He said that when he was in England during the war, 
some conscientious objectors who were interned were taking a 
walk when they were insulted by some soldiers ; whereupon the ob- 
jectors turned on their tormentors and beat twice their own number 
to a jelly; to the unfeigned surprise of people who imagined them 
cowards, because they would not fight. Of course these non-com- 
batants are a great nuisance and cannot be tolerated in war time, 
but they are not moral perverts nor are they cowards, necessarily. 
•¥ * * 

— One can get some idea of the actual advance in wealth of 
the bay communities by the announcement that the East Bay sec- 
tion is ready to spend $60,000,000 on a water supply and has 
hired Mulholl and Goethals and Davis, three of the greatest engin- 
eers in the world, to put it through. Just looked at from a money 
angle, what would have been said of the judgment of a man who 
twenty years ago would have ventured to predict the possibility 
of the East Bay communities financing such a scheme? And yet 
it is looked upon as a mere fleabite and there is no doubt of the 
ability of the community to handle it. And we are still only at 
the threshold of our potentialities. 

— The lax way in which the public has been regarding motor 
accidents which kill people, has been properly rebuked in the Su- 
perior Court of Alameda County, where the district attorney bluntly 
informed the jury that unless a conviction was had in the case of a 
drunken motorist, who killed an aged pedestrian, the district attor- 
ney s office would not take an interest in such cases. "It is up to 
the people of this county," he said, "to assist in stamping out the 
drunken motorists who swoop down on pedestrians and kill them." 
It is to be wished that some one in the district attorney's office would 
take just that line here. We are potential murderers in our free 
and easy fashion of regarding such matters. 

— We have not hitherto commented on the beauty and sweet 
grace of Mary Philbin in the film called "The Merry Go Round" 
for fear that we might be accused of log-rolling for the theater and 
giving advertisement in the wrong part of the paper. But now that 
the show is nearly over, we shall feel better for saying that nothing 
more tenderly touching has been seen here for a very long time, if 
ever. This play marks a new point in the development of the film 
and will go far to establish its hitherto very doubtful artistic po- 
tentialities. 

— There is much talk here in educational circles about the value 
of the Polytechnic School at San Luis Obispo, which has been the 
victim of the economic policy of the governor. How can one get 
at the actual value of that institution? Those who are against 
the governor are making the school a political question and are 
shrieking that one of the great institutions of the state has been 
fatally crippled. Others say that the school is a fake concern, 
that it never amounted to much, that its teachers were and are ped- 
agogical lame ducks. Who is right? 



—The local clergy are coming out with the statement that Can- 
adian marriages are more successful than ours because there is a 
divorce action in only two-thirds of one per cent. But there is no- 
thing to that. Human nature is human nature and if there is a 
smaller percentage of divorce you may make up your mind that 
there is a larger percentage of suffering. A suffering marriage, 
which cannot be dissolved either through the harshness of laws or 
through the fear of social ostracism, is not a successful marriage, all 
the talking in the world to the contrary. We abide by our policy 
of a quick and painless release from an impossible situation. 
* * * 

— The resolution of Dr. Campbell, the new president of the 
University of California, to ihterfere with free criticism of the uni- 
versity and its staff, by the students, is a grave mistake which can- 
not but reflect badly on the university and will be the source of great 
trouble to the president himself. With all the scandals which have 
attended university life lately, such as that at Amherst and other 
places, there is growing up a profound-^tTOSt^—tJiek-ttiHversity 
among our people and funds for a state university may easily fail 
of being furnished by a legislature. Liberty pays best even if 
sometimes abused. 



— There was an evident feeling among large portions of the 
business world here that all day Friday was more than they could af- 
ford out of respect to the dead. So that the wholesale district was 
by no means a desert and the large numbers of lorries and delivery 
wagons showed that much business was being done, somewhat sur- 
reptitiously, perhaps, but still being done. An unexpected dislo- 
cation of the processes of economic life work great hardship now- 
adays and cannot be accepted without protest. So though the day 
was not universally recognized local business did its best. 

— It is simply astonishing how a public institution to which there 
is any pay attached, grows. We have a public defender. We have 
not had him very long and now he wants two assistants at three 
thousand dollars each. It may be all right, for, after all, three 
thousand dollars is no very large sum out of our expenditures, and 
it may be worth the money, but it is funny how a thing which never 
heretofore existed, suddenly becomes essential as soon as there is a 
salary and politics. We saw the same thing in the probation office 
and the thousand and one other things that the municipality de- 
velops. There is always a hole for money to fall into, anyhow. 



The New Society Blue Book 



Wish to announce that they are now 
making ready for press. This book 
will contain the names and addresses, 
phones, etc.. of the most prominent 
families in San Francisco. Alameda 
County. Marin County. San Mateo 
County, etc. Also men and women's 
clubs of high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses. Communicate Willi 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

lf>5f> Mason Street. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Franklin 6912. 

Subscription Price 98.00 IVr Year. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 



: '■- S-. r. x ::: Sis -- = ';; is; ,-. I x.zz s '■-" '■;-:. S'ssx S a * a s. ..- » ■ .*" 3?'s s"!.; gsgglRlgl!! 



▼ | Electricity-Its Growth and Worth 





\N FRANCISCO and the West have long been recog- 
nized as the pioneer center of the electrical industry. 
Our giant hydro-electric power plants and networked 
systems, together with the tremendous undeveloped water 
resources, excite the professional interest of world re- 
nowned engineers. The development of the giant hydro-electric powei 
systems has made possible the rapid development of California's re' 
sources. Former deserts are now thriving orchards and prosperou; 
towns, because the water first used to generate electricity is avail- 
able for irrigation and the general uses of mankind. With the ex- 
ception of isolated ranches and ranch communities, electricity at 
least for lighting, is universally used in California. In many homes 
electricity is used for lighting, cooking, cleaning and heating. 

In the development of electric heaters and appliances, the Ma- 
jestic Electric Appliance Company, of San Francisco, is recog- 
nized as the pioneer manufacturer on the Pacific Coast. The Com- 
pany was organized in 1914, for the purpose of manufacturing elec- 
trical appliances. The "Majestic" round type portable heater, the 
first of its kind, was marketed and was immediately successful. 
Thousands of "Majestic" heaters have since been sold with the result 
that the name "Majestic" as applied to an electric heater is well and 
favorably known all over the United States as well as most foreign 
countries. The "Majestic" is fully covered by patents, therefore, 
the Company is still reaping the benefits from its earlier pioneer work. 
During the past few years many large hydro-electric power gen- 
erating stations have been installed with the result that rates to con- 
sumers of electricity, have been materially reduced, the service 
unexcelled and thoroughly dependable. The public has been quick 
to realize these facts and have taken to the use of electrically operated 
labor-saving devices for almost every household task. The rapid 
increase in the use of electricity has called for the development of 
heating appliances of many types and a variety of uses. The elec- 
tric heating of homes, schools, churches and office buildings is no 
longer a theory, but an accomplished fact. Many Majestic heavy 
duty heaters have been sold for this purpose. These heaters con- 
sume from 2000 watts to 6000 watts per hour, according to size 
and the requirements of the building. For this service the Majestic 
Company has just developed a series of new designs which are said 
to excel anything heretofore offered by any manufacturer. 

The fireplace heater is designed to harmonize with the beauty 
and comfort of the modern home. This heater is a combination 
radiant and convection type. Radiant heat rays are thrown out 
from glowing coils and at the same time the air of the room is 
heated by passing through the heater. This same principle of de- 
sign is used in the baseboard and wall insert heaters. The insert 
heaters are particularly well adapted to use in offices and homes. 
By being inserted in the wall or baseboard, they are entirely out 
of the way and do not interfere with the orderly or artistic arrange- 
ment of the furniture or fixtures, and yet are exceedingly efficient. 
The Electric Bathroom heater manufactured by the Majestic Com- 
pany, is very popular, because it solves the problem of heating the 
bathroom at a nominal cost. Ordinarily the bathroom is not pro- 
vided with any means of obtaining heat and consequently bath- 
ing is not pleasant. The "Majestic" heater designed especially for 
this purpose is inserted in the wall and radiates cheerful warmth 
at the turn of a switch. 

Cooking by electricity is no longer a matter of theory or experi- 



ment. It is an accomplished fact that is evidenced by the installa- 
tion of thousands of electric ranges throughout California. A Ma- 
jestic Electric Range that will embody a number of new and patent- 
able features will be ready for the market in the very near future. 
Thousands of satisfied customers are now using the Combination 
Electric Pancake and Waffle Iron now made by the Majestic Com- 
pany. This device has stood the test of actual service in thousands 
of homes and has received the stamp of public approval. The name, 
"MAJESTIC", as applied to electric heating appliances is a house- 
hold word in the United States and is well and favorably known 
in many foreign countries. 

The Company has paid dividends to date amounting to $97,- 
500.00, which is equivalent to 194 per cent return on the original 
capitalization. Beginning operations with a cash investment of 
only $5,000.00 and patents valued at $45,000.00, the Majestic Elec- 
tric Appliance Company has not only built up a large and lucrative 
business, but, in addition, net worth amounting to $398,936.00 has 
been accumulated. Since its organization in 1914, the Company's 
growth has been phenomenal. An indication of the tremendous 
earning power of the Company is evidenced by the fact that to 
date Income Taxes amounting to $110,016.29 has been paid the 
United States Government. 

The products of the Majestic Electric Development Company 
are sold by electrical supply jobbers and dealers throughout the 
entire country. Over 700 electrical supply and hardware jobbers, 
with total sales organization of about five thousand trained men, 
are selling the products of the Company to the retail trade. Majes- 
tic products are sold to the public by retail stores located in every 
important town in the United States. An aggressive sales and ad- 
vertising campaign which is now being prepared will carry the 
message of Majestic Electrical Appliances to every home. The 
demand for electrical appliances is greater than ever, and conse- 
quently the opportunity for profitable development is greater. 

The continuous development in the West of water power re- 
sources, and the construction in the East of super-electric power 
systems, will eventually operate to reduce to a minimum the cost 
of electrical energy, a factor that will tend to greatly increase sales 
of electrical appliances. The future possibilities for greatly increased 
sales can best be judged from statistics compiled by leaders in the 
electrical industry. These statistics show that only 62 per cent 
of the population of the United States are at present living in com- 
munities served by electric power companies. In other words, 38 per 
cent of the population are not able to obtain electricity from power 
companies and to enjoy the benefits of electricity will have to install 
their own plants or wait until the power companies expand to take 
care of their needs. It is estimated that there are 1 1,284,650 dwell- 
ings located in communities served by electric power companies. 
Of this number 56 per cent or 6,291,160 are wired and are using 
electricity. 

The above statistics were compiled and published by the "Elec- 
trical World" in 1920. New homes built during 1921 and 1922 
are estimated at 2,250,000; all of which will, of course, be modern in 
every respect. There are, therefore, about 8,500,000 electrically wired 
dwellings, each a prospect for at least one of the electric appliances 
manufactured by Majestic Company. 

(Continued On Page 18.) 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



Mystic Electric ^ppli^nce Co, Inc 
690 Eolsom St., S E 



ExTERjOR. PL.HNT 




12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 




BUSY CUPID. 

BULL-McCOY — Miss Newell Bull has chosen Thursday, Septem- 
ber 20, as the date for her marriage to Mr. Paul Johnstone 
McCoy. It is to be a large wedding, and Miss Bull will have 
a number o£ attendants, but as yet these have not all been 
chosen. 

GIUFFITH-LANDRETH — The announcement of the engagement 
of Miss Gertrude Griffith of Los Angeles to Harold Brooks 
Landreth of Pasadena, which was announced in San Rafael 
is of particular interest here. 

The announcement was made at a tea given by Mrs. Aimer 
Newhall and Mrs. Rensen Bird of Los Angeles. Mrs. Bird 
is visiting at the Aimer Newhall home for a few weeks. 
Miss Griffith arrived from the south on Tuesday and is the 
house guest of Miss Louisiana Foster at the A. W. Foster 
home in San Rafael. Miss Griffith has many friends here 
and will be extensively entertained during her visit here. Her 
family is very prominent in the south as is also that of Mr. 
Landreth. 
No date has been set for the wedding. 

JOHNSON-YOUGHT — The wedding of Miss Frances Johnson and 
Mr. Russell Yought, which took place on Saturday at Alta, in 
Placer County, was one of the most picturesque which has 
ever taken place in California. It was an out-of-door wed- 
ding at the summer home of the bride's mother, Mrs. James 
W. Ward, and Dr. Ward, and the natural setting needed little 
improvement in the way of decorating, but what there was, 
was carried out in perfect harmony with the surroundings. 
The ceremony was performed at 12 o'clock and an altar had 
been erected in a grove of pine trees near a lake, the glistening 
water showing through the trees and making a background of 
unusual beauty. 

The bride was attended by Mrs. Frederick Johnson. Miss Aila 
Ward, the bride's other attendant. Ralph Cromwell was best 
man. Mr. and Mrs. Vought will make their home in San 
Francisco. In the early winter they will go to New York to 
visit the bridegroom's parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Vought, 
who were unable to come West for the wedding owing to 
Mrs. Vought's recent illness. 

STANYAN-BUCKINGHAM — Miss Martha Anne Stanyan, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hendee Stanyan, was married 
Wednesday to Dr. Henry Proctor Buckingham, son of Mrs. 
Buckingham of this city and of the late Aurelius E. Buck- 
ingham. The ceremony, which united the two prominent 
pioneer families, took place at St. Luke's Church, followed 
by a reception at the home of the bride's parents. 
The bride's attendants were Miss Dorothea Mansfeldt. Miss 
Vera Pixley, Mrs. Charles Stanyan and Mrs. Harold Pierce. 
George Buckingham was his brother's best man and the ush- 
ers were Messrs. Fisher Buckingham. Hervey Sheldon of Los 
Angeles, Herbert Crall and Sophus Goth. 
The Stanyans are one of the old families that for decades 
have had more or less to do with affairs here. The bride's 
paternal grandfather was one of the men who helped to per- 
suade the early citizens to own Golden Gate Park. 
LUNCHEONS. 

JACKMAN — Just home from her wedding trip, Mrs. James Jack- 
man (Anne Peters), was being welcomed Monday at the 
St. Francis by hosts of her friends. She was with Mrs. Will- 
iam Mayo Newhall, Jr. 

GRANT — Mrs. Adam Grant was the guest of honor at a hand- 
some luncheon party given recently by Mrs. Eleanor Doe at 
the Samarkand Hotel in Santa Barbara. 

PARK — In honor of her mother, Mrs. Edward H. Clark of New 
York, who is passing the summer in California, Mrs. Howard 
Park entertained at luncheon at her home in Burlingame on 
Thursday afternoon. 

SHARON — Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon opened her home at Menlo 
Park on Saturday for an informal luncheon, at which she 
entertained Mr. and Mrs. James Flood, Mr. and Mrs. Perry 
Eyre. Miss Fanny and Miss May Friedlander, Miss Cora 
Jane Flood and Dr. Harry Tevis. 

SARGENT — Mr. Peters was the incentive for a small luncheon 
given Monday by Mrs. James P. Sargent of Monterey. The 
luncheon party was given at the Hotel St. Francis. 



ST. FRANCIS — An attractive group at lunch Monday included 
Mrs. Alexander Rutherford, Miss Jean Boyd and Miss Tiny 
O'Connor. Mr. and Mrs. Mark Gerstle and their daughter. 
Miss Miriam Gerstle were with Mr. and Mrs. Michel Weil and 
Mrs. Joel Kaufman entertained a small group. Mrs. Ritchie 
Dunn was hostess to Mrs. A. P. Hotaling and Miss Celia 
O'Connor. Other small groups included Mrs. Violet Dunn, 
who had a few friends with her and Mrs. Alanson Weeks, who 
presided over a charming group of six. 
TEAS. 

ARMSBY — After a long absence East, Mr. and Mrs. George N. 
Armsby are again greeting their friends at many a charming 
affair at their picturesque home in Burlingame. Monday they 
had a most enjoyable afternoon party to meet Miss Jane 
Cowl, the winsome actress, whose visits here are always 
marked by affairs in her honor. 

DE ST. CYR — The Jean de St. Cyr home in San Mateo was ex- 
ceptionally gay over the week-end. Mr. and Mrs. de St. Cyr 
having entertained a large party of house guests. On Sunday 
afternoon they gave a luncheon in compliment to Mrs. Ru- 
pert Hughes, who was visiting them, and in the evening they 
were hosts at a dinner which was given in honor of Rollo 
Peters. 

WOODS — In honor of her nephew. Mr. Rollo Peters, who is be- 
ing entertained at a round of affairs during his stay in San 
Francisco, Mrs. Robert J. Woods was hostess at an informal 
tea Monday afternoon. The affair was given at the Town and 
Country Club, the guests including a group of intimate friends 
of the popular young actor. 

WILKINS — Mrs. Taliaferro Milton, who has been the incentive 
for numberless parties since her arrival in California for the 
summer, was again entertained Monday afternoon. Her sister- 
in-law. Mrs. Harry H. Wilkins, was the hostess in her honor 
and presided over an attractive bridge tea at her home in this 
city. 

BRIDGE. 

BULL — Miss Newell Bull entertained at an informal bridge party 
Monday afternoon at her home in this city in honor of her 
house guest, .Miss Margaret Morgan, of Butte, Mont. 
DINNERS. 

ARMSBY — Mr. and Mrs. George N. Armsby have issued invita- 
tions for a dinner to be given at their home in Burlingame 
on Monday evening in honor of Henry Hadley, Henri Scott 
and Joseph D. Redding. The affair will include members of 
the fashionable Burlingame and San Mateo colonies. 

KELHAM — Mr. and Mrs. George Kelham and Mr. Robert Hender- 
son were hosts at a dinner party in Marin County, Saturday 
evening, when they entertained a party of friends at Pastori's. 

LAPHAM — Mr. and Mrs. Roger Lapham gave a large dinner and 
dance on Saturday evening at their home in Menlo Park. 

McCORMICK — Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch were guests of honor 
at a dinner over which Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick pre- 
sided at their home in Menlo Park, Tuesday. 

PENTZ — Complimenting her two nieces. Miss Deborah and Miss 
Edith Pentz, Miss Anne Pentz will give a dinner at their 
home in San Rafael this Saturday. A score of guests from the 
younger circles of society will be included in the company, 
and after the dinner they will repair to the Hotel Rafael 
for dancing. 

PHELAN — Miss Mary Louise Phelan returned Saturday evening 
to her home in Washington Street, after a trip through the 
Northwestern States and Western Canada. She has been 
away for eight weeks. 

FLOOD — "Linden Towers." the country home of Mr. and Mrs. 
James Flood, at Menlo Park, was the setting for a buffet 
supper on Saturday evening, when Mr. and Mrs. Flood enter- 
tained thirty guests — a group of young married people and 
young girls and their escorts of the peninsula. The supper 
party followed a golf tournament at the Menlo Countrv 
Club. 

THORNE — Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thorne were hosts at dinner 
at the Hotel St. Francis on Monday evening, later taking 
their guests to the performance of "Romeo and Juliet" at the 
Curran Theater. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



WELCH— Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch entertained at an infor- 
mal dinner Sunday evening at their home in Baywood Ave- 
nue, Sun Mateo. 

IX TOWN AMI OUT. 

CROCKER — Miss Maii. mi Crocker and Miss Mary Julia Crocker 
i'ii Monday for New York and Europe, to remain abroad 
for several months. They will only be in New York for a 
short time, as they will sail August 21 on the Aquitania for 

the other side, where they will be joined shortly by their 
mother, Mrs. Henry J. Crocker. 

BOYD — Miss Jean Boyd of San Rafael has gone north and is 
visiting her aunt, Mrs. Allen Lewis, at her seaside home in 
Oregon. 

SESNON — Mr. and Mrs. William T. Sesnon are entertaining as 
their house guest at Santa Cruz, over the week-end, Mr. and 
Mrs. Jack Boyden, Miss Adrianne Sharp, Miss Helen Brack 
and a compliment of young men. The Sesnons will return 
to town on the first of September. 

LENT — Mr. and Mrs. George H. Lent and Miss Elizabeth Lent 
have gone to Santa Barbara for a visit of several weeks. 
They have taken apartments at El Canto for the period of 
their stay. 

NORMS — There was a family reunion at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Gilman Norris at Saratoga over the week-end, 
when Mr. and Mrs. Norris entertained different members of 
the Thompson family, relatives of Mrs. Norris, who was 
Miss Kathleen Thompson. 

SPRECKLES — Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Spreckles and their child- 
ren are passing the week-end at their country place in the 
Napa Valley. Mrs. Spreckles and her daughter, Alma Spreckles, 
recently returned to their home in this city after a several 
months' sojourn in Paris. 

SIMPSON — Admiral and Mrs. Edward Simpson, who recently 
returned from the East are at the Fairmont. 

WINCHESTER — Miss Patience Winchester, who has been at- 
tending an Eastern college, returned to California last Sat- 
urday and has joined her mother and aunt. Mrs. Frank Win- 
chester and Miss Margaret Foster, at their home in Mission 
Avenue, in San Rafael. 

Y'OUNGER — Mrs. William Younger, who returned not long ago 
from Paris, is visiting her daughters, the Baroness Nugent 
and Mrs. Burns McDonald, at Carmel. 

SPRECKLES — Mrs. Rudolph Spreckles and her daughter, Miss 
Eleanor Spreckles, who have been passing several weeks in 
Santa Barbara, returned the latter part of last week to their 
home at Burlingame. 

ARTSIMOVITCH — Mrs. Valdimir Artsimovitch of Paris and 
her sister, Mrs. Eugene Goodwin of Berkeley, have gone to 
Santa Barbara, to visit Mrs. William G. Henshaw. Mis. 
Artsimovitch and Mrs. Henshaw visited together in Paris. 

DROWN — Miss Josephine Drown and her brother. Willard N. 
Drown. Jr.. will leave on the 29th of August for Chicago, 
accompanying Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dunham, with whom they 
will pass the winter. Before her marriage several months 
ago, Mrs. Dunham was Mrs. Edith Preston Drown. 

STEINBERGER — Mr. and Mrs. Robert Steinbergor. the latter of 
Whom was Miss Lillian Newbauer before her marriage last 
November, have returned to town after a sojourn of several 
weeks at Lake Tahoe and are visiting Mrs. Steinberger's 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Newhauer in West Clay Park. 

INTIMATIONS. 

CROCKER — The luncheon which Mrs. William II. Crocker was 
tu have given Monday at her home in Burlingame lias boon 
postponed to a later date. Mrs. Crocker hastened to Peb- 
ble Beach early Sunday morning on account of the accident 
io the car which her son. Mr. Charles Crocker, was driving, 
and which resulted in the tragic death of young James R 
Curran. 

heardslee — Mrs. Frederick W, Beardslee will leave New Y'ork 

on August -- for London, where she will visit relatives 
ter she will go to Paris, where she will lie the guest of another 
niece. In company with her sister-in-law. Comtess de Brie, 
she will travel abroad for several months, visiting France, 
Italy and Switzerland. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Vnn Nesn Ave., ftt Uenry Street SAS FBANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 




By A FLICKER. 

ELINOR GLY'N regards "Three Weeks" as probably the most 
misunderstood book in the world. Mine, Glyn is now per- 
sonally assisting in a film adaption of the novel. She said: 
"I wrote it for two reasons, the first Ijeing to prove the effect 
of a great love upon a man's character in opening his, eyes to the 
fine in everything; the second, to explain the laws of cause and 
effect, and to show that we each of us pay the price or receive 
the reward of every action we commit, whether it is good or 
evil." 



After seaching the southern part of California by motor boat, 
motor car and by airplane, Director King Vidor could find no 
Swampy land of the kind demanded by the Joseph Hergesheimer 
novel, "Wild Oranges," which will be his next Goldwyn picture. 
So he will go to the swamp lands of Georgia on "location." 

The land into which Vidor and his company will go is almost 
never visited by white men, according to the swampland experts, 
and few of the negro guides are really acquainted with the dense 
forest of trees, moss and grass. Negro guides will be provided 
for the company. Filming of the Vidor picture in its natural 
settings will he the first time the motion picture camera will 
ever have been carried into the Georgia swamps, it is said. The 
director has completed the script of "Wild Oranges" and the 
cast is now being selected. 



"More real acting ability is needed for the screen than the 
stage." 

List to the outraged roar of the thespians, the wail of the trage- 
dians, the clamor of the "legitimates," when that opinion is ex- 
pressed. 

"Not so long ago, I was of the opinion that only real acting 
occurred on the stage." Littlefield, who plays in "Three Wise 
Fools," told an interviewer recently. "The last few years, in 
which time I have been on the screen, have changed my view- 
point altogether. On the stage, five-sixths of the acting is 
done with the voice. Only those seated near the stage really 
can study the speaker's face, so the expressions and gestures be- 
come incidentals to the spoken lines. On the screen, the speeches 
are gone, save for the brief scattered titles, and one must 
get over to the audience with expression and gesture the emo- 
tion he wishes to convey. Mind you. I'm not saying that there 
is more good acting done in the pictures than on the stage. 
What 1 mean is that better and more difficult acting is required 
by the one medium than by the other." 



Lew Cody declares he would rather have an honest criticism 
.Mil if he gets stepped on than a mushy interview. He says 
he likes to be described as he really is. and. if he has faults, he 
welcomes mention of them that he may correct them. 



"There is a motion picture censor outside with three friends," 
said the watchman on the ■Greed" location. 

■That is a phenomenon I would like to see," said Eric von 
Stroheim. "show them in." 



A letter has been received by studio executives from Sir Hall 
Cain.' lauding the work, the personality and the ability of Victor 
Seastrom, who is directing the screen version of Sir Hall's most 
recent novel. "The Master of Man." Seastrom is working in San 
Francisco again on location. 



That San Franciscans are extremely interested in Eric von 
Stroheim's "Greed." a screen version of Frank Norris' novel, 
"McTeague," is shown by the fact that 500 neighborhood people 
took part in the mob scene of that production without pay. The 
city of San Francisco also loaned twenty police ambulances 
from Central Emergency Hospital for one of the big scenes. 
Photography on this production will soon be completed. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sntter «1S0 Under Management CARL 3 STAJ^LET 



!4 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 




By P. N. BERINGER 



Cheap Money— VIII. 

CUNO, the genius, who seems to stand 
head and shoulders above all of the 
others in managing the affairs of mor- 
ibund Germany, announced last Week that 
there would be no recession from the pro- 
gram of printing all the morxy the govern- 
ment and private presses could turn out. 

The six government printing houses were 
groaning with the load of printing placed 
upon them and, in addition to these, six pri- 
vate press rooms were delivering money to 
the government. The Reichsbank was turn- 
ing out money as fast from the front door as 
the government could deliver to it by the 
back door and momentarily the so-called 
value of the paper mark plunged downward. 
So, that one German, on presenting an Amer- 
ican dollar, received millions of marks in 
exchange. One day, the quotation was made 
that one could purchase five million in 
marks for one American silver dollar. 



By the Wheel Barrow. 

And the German people removed their 
wages, or the marks they received in ex- 
change for real money, in wheel barrows, in 
market baskets, in barrels and by the bale. 
One newspaper quotes as fact that junk deal- 
ers would pay more for marks than others 
because of the real value still resided in the 
mark when used as old paper in manufac- 
turing purposes. 



The Value of Discipline. 

The actions of the German people these 
days serves to remind one of the great value 
of a strictly enforced discipline and the stern 
inculcation of the class system. In any oth- 
er country, by this time, the government 
would have been upset and the mark abso- 
lutely repudiated and a return to some sort 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 Hush Street 

Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 



of financial amity would have been advocat- 
ed long ago. But in Germany, where for 
hundreds of years the idea has been fostered 
that once a farmer always a farmer, once a 
shoemaker, always a shoemaker, once a pleb- 
ian, always a plebian, once an aristocrat, 
always an aristocrat, such a thing as revo- 
lution is well nigh an impossibility. Such 
an example of placid stupidity has never 
before been given the world. And yet this 
is the nation which a great many people 
and some educators of note were not so 
very long ago acclaiming as the supermen 
and women of the world. And yet, the worm 
may turn and the revolution may come. 



The Intellectuals. 

In the parliament of Germany there has 
been a tremendous uproar, most of it caused 
by the cheap money, and the valuelessness 
of the mark, but some of it by the occupa- 
tion of the Ruhr territory by the French and 
Belgians. The members of this parliament 
have had a merry time with Cuno and with 
Stinnes, and these, and others, have been 
called dogs and the favorite epithet of the 
German, when he is angry, swine. Personal 
encounters between socialists and commu- 
nists have occurred. The threat has been 
made that the buried rapid fire guns would 
be mounted on the Brandenburg gate and 
that revolution would be subdued. So far, 
however, it has all been a sort of leaderless 
and purposeless hysteria which is fronting 
Cuno and Stinnes and the rest of the manu- 
facturing and export clan, who are making 
money out of the mark depreciation. Will 
there arise a leader, a really constructive 
mind to bring order out of the chaos? 



The French Franc. 

There is no economic good reason for 
the depreciation in buying power or value 
of the French franc. In New York the franc 
was worth less last week, at times, than it 
was worth in France. The French do not 
seem to be very much excited over this, and 
it is asserted that the value of the franc is 
only affected by a political manoeuvre oc- 
curring in various directions, through a man- 
ipulation having its origin in England. The 
French assert that English financier-politic- 
ians believe that anything which may injure 
France at this particular time is a justifiable 
thing to do and that the attack on the value 
of the franc is a perfectly justifiable meas- 
ure. 



The English Premier. 

The English people are angry at France 
and it is expected that through an alliance 
with Italy and by causing Belgium to lose its 
confidence in France, a rift may be accomp- 
lished which will, in time, allow England to 
pose as the savior of Germany. But England 
— we purposely refrain from saying the Brit- 
ish — has a huge job on its hands, even 
though it might be successful in ousting 
France from the Ruhr and re-establishing 
Germany as the strongest industrial nation 
of the continent. England is powerless to 
change things to any very great extent as 
France proposes to go right on and make 
Germany come to her senses. 



An Irish Experiment. 

Speaking of cheap money makes me think 
of a curious experiment made by one Will- 
iam Wood, in 1 722. Wood obtained from 
the British Crown the patent to coin money 
of copper to the amount of one hundred and 
eight thousand pounds for Ireland. The Irish 
did not take kindly to the idea, strange as 
that may seem, and refused utterly to take 
the money. This copper penny, moreover 
was smaller than the British penny and was 
of a much baser metal. When the Irish peo- 
ple refused to take these coins as money, 
Wood asked that the British government 
compel them into circulation by various 
methods and notably through the King's 
Commissioners and through the Collectors of 
Customs. The attempt to provide a country 
with coin having practically no real value 



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(at Polk) Phone Prospect 6575 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



IS 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



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— dancing every evening; swimming 
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fell to the ground mainly on account of the 
warfare waged againsl this imposition on 
Ireland carried on in England itself. Dean 
Swift was the intellectual head of the move- 
ment against Wood's copper coins. Wood 
based his idea on the fact that there was not 
enough money in Ireland, and that if more 
was coined and forced into circulation, then 
there would be more in the hands of the poor. 
The Irish experiment is one of the very few 
made with cheap money that did NOT take. 



Mining. 

Now comes the news of a vast merger from 
the old Comstock. American and British cap- 
italists have combined their interests in the 
North End and Middle Area. Bulkley Wells, 
H. G. Humphries, and other noted mine own- 
ers are credited with making tentative offers 
for the North End properties. The North 
End group consists of the Consolidated Vir- 
ginia, Ophir, Mexican, and othel properties. 
Rich ore was recently struck in the Ophir 
above the Sutro Tunnel. Profitable ore is 
going to the Mexican Mill from the Con. Vir- 
ginia and the Ophir mines. The mill at the 
United Comstock group is averaging better 
than 2000 tons of ore daily. This product 
is reported to run around $6 per ton. New 
territory is being developed. The company 
is preparing to start deep operations in the 
Overman shaft. 



Ethel — I don't see how she managed to 
live with him so long before starting divorce 
proceedings. 

Clara — Oh, she was merely waiting until 
he could afford to pay her alimony worth 
while, my dear! 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of Michael Madden, deceased, No. ::;<<::: 
Dept No 1" 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
\v ,i. Hynes, administrator of the tsi;ii.- of 

Michael Madden, d sased, i" the creditors of 

and ;t II persons having claims against the said 
decedent, t<> file them with tin- necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office i»f the Clerk 
>>f the Superior Court of the state of California, 
in and for the ''Me ami ' '"U!i?\ of San Francisco, 
or in exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 
within four tit months after tlie first publica- 
tion of this notice t-> the said administrator, at 
ins office, B58 Phelan Building, San Francisco, 

California, which said last-n I office the un- 

dersigned selects as ins place of business in all 
natters i id with said est Michael 

Mad. ten, de. -eased. 

W. .1 HYNBS, 
istrator "f the estate "f 

Michael Madd i Dei eased. 
San Francisco, California, August 9, 



Dated 

9 

• TI.I.1XAX & HICKEY 
attorneys for Ad 




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Reasonable 

at this 

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DAIEY 

One person, room with 

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Two persons, room with 

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One person, room without 

bath $2.50 

Two persons, room without 

bath $3.50-$4.00 

WEEKLY K A IKS 

One person, room with 

bath $21.00 

Two persons, room with 

bath $30.00 

One person, room without 

bath $15.00 

Two persons, room without 

bath $21.00 

Monthly rates are figured at 24 
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AlSfl A I. a (arte 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18. 1923. 




leisure's Wind 



OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

lorn Moore, 



Granada. 

"Three Wise Fools" was indeed an agree- 
able surprise to one person, and that was 
your humble critic. The play was rather 
an effort, and the story itself is not very 
strong, but the picture is good, very good. 
And it is excellently well acted throughout. 
With three master players like William H. 
Crane, Claude Gillingwater and Alec Fran- 
cis, and the charming actress, Eleanor Board- 
man, success is assured. And of course, many 
scenes and situations are introduced to add to 
the excitement and interest that were beyond 
the limitations of the stage production. The 
escape from the prison is most thrilling. 
Crime in the movies assumes noble propor- 
tions and is surrounded by a glamour quite 
irresistible. While the morals of the movies 
are unassailable, of course, and right is sep- 
arated from wrong, like the sheep from the 
goats, with admirable and unmistakeable pre- 
cision, there is always that luscious mouth- 
ful of unadulterated crime that we can swal- 
low and relish — before the end of the pic- 
ture triumphs. Paul Ash has a prominent 
place on the bill, and Jack Partington's won- 
derful word-series is becoming quite a fea- 
ture of Granada entertainment. One reads 
them with admiration not unmixed with 
awe. 



California. 

"Daughters of the Rich" is a screen adap- 
tion of Edgar Saltus' story, and it is surpris- 
ing to see this exotic author expressing his 
luxurious fancies through the more obvious 
methods of the motion picture artist. The 
plot is flimsy and the acting is nothing in 
particular, but some of the scenes in the 
play are most diverting. The bachelor sup- 
per of the graceless French Duke, where 
the guests wear riding togs and the dining 
room is arranged like a stable, with a pretty 
girl in each stall and a horseshoe table; the 
breakfast of this same Duke person, consist- 
ing of a bottle of champagne, a lengthy cig- 
arette, a huge block of ice in which are stuck 
sardellen; the duel scene (reminiscent of the 
famous painting) in the French wood, early 
morning. Frenchman and American with pis- 
tols, both wounded; then the gorgeous boud- 
oir of the American Duchess — one mentions 
only scenes in describing this picture, be- 
cause it is the scenes that are remembered 
not any of the rest of it. One recalls it in 
bits. The Duke deserves notice; he is so very 
bad. Bad histrionically as well as morally. 
Stuart Holmes never did such a poor piece of 
work; he made the part grotesque and clown- 
ish and that was unnecessary. We have seen 



so many wicked European noblemen lately on 
the screen who have been perfectly fascinat- 
ing, that this bungling and exaggerated per- 
formance is distasteful in extreme. Ruth Clif- 
ford, blonde and inane, is the American girl 
whose mother marries her to the Duke. Gas- 
ten Glass is the dapper hero whom she real- 
ly loves. I wonder why? He is not much of 
a hero and hardly anything at all of an 
actor. Miriam Cooper is the abused heroine. 
Don't worry about Miriam, however. She be- 
longs to a race that is not easily suppressed, 
and we behold her at the end with a strong, 
sure arm encircling firmly the neck of the 
willing hero, Gaston. She got him. They al- 
ways do. Then there was an enterprising lit- 
tle French cocotte, played by Ethel Shannon, 
introduced by an amusing title: "A lady who 
lives for the present, and the better the pres- 
ent, the better she lives." 

The organ roared in an almost deafening 
manner throughout the evening, only leav- 
ing off to let Henri Scott roar "Mandalay" 
in a fruity baritone with many facial gym- 
nastics. He also gave the Toreador Song to 
the delight of the easily pleased audience. 



The Capitol. 

"The White Alley" as a play is quite thin 
in spots. Its plot is visualized from the start 
and the run of the thing is in keeping with 
what one would expect given the circum- 
stances created by the heroine, if she may 
so be called. Nance O'Neil is still a great 
actress and sometimes in this play she rises to 
the old heights. The trouble is the heights 
are old. The Magna Wellman of Keith 
Wakeman is a very disappointing thing and 
this actress only restores herself to the favor 
of the critic when she drops the overdone 
tragedy queen style of utterances of the first 
scene. Nan Harper is a fairly good Jeanne. 
Alfred Hickman gives us an irreproachably 
acted Richard Lindtner. Ann Naughton cap- 
tured the house with her Torp. This cap- 
ture was made easier by the nature of the 
acting of the rest of the company which was 
just fair, except the part of Joergen Malthe 
and that of Doctor Rothe, both of which were 
carried very capably. 

The gowns worn by Miss O'Neil and others 
of the company form quite a fashion show. 



Portola. 

You know those log-rolling pictures? Roar- 
ing cataracts, lunging logs, frothing, angry 
waters, heart-stilling escapes and rescues, tor- 
rents and wild winds? Well, that is "The 
Man From Glengarry" — a full-blooded play, 
a lusty and vigorous performance, with a 



rugged hero, a dimpled heroine, a martyr 
father, a really delicious villain, an impossible 
flapper, and a large number of log-rolling 
young gentlemen who performed frightful 
feats of agility on the troubled waters. The 
rugged hero had a busy life of it, but his 
broad shoulders never drooped and his square 
jaw remained firm to the last. I wish I could 
remember the name of this industrious young 
actor, but it did not stay with me, and I can 
only commend his sturdy strength and close 
attention to business. He did just what the 
megaphone told him to do in every instance. 
Mr. Irving, who conducts, quite without os- 
tentation, the Portola orchestra, is a modest 
musicianly chap. A Felix Cartoon gave the 
program a touch of fun. 



Greatest American Actress At Orpheum. 

Ethel Barrymore made a speech. Some one 
in the wings (I wonder if it was Virginia 
Chauvenet) dared her to, and she came out 
and laughingly said, "Thank you, thank you. 
That's all there is. There isn't any more." 
Ah, the pity of it — that there wasn't any 
mere. For the clapping, clamoring Orpheum 
audience wanted more. "The Twelve- 
Pcund Look" is very short and does not give 
Miss Barrymore scope for her wonderful 
gifts. However, one is grateful for such rich 
fragments, and the enthusiasm expressed by 
her enormous audiences will assure Ethel Bar- 
rymore of San Francisco's adoring delight in 
her. The Barrie playlet went well. Virginia 
Chauvenet was a touching and tremulous 
Lady Sims. No, not tremulous, for her poor, 
broken-spirited fortitude was the most piti- 
ful thing about her. In appearance, voice, 
and personal effect. Miss Chauvenet was 
the unfortunate, submerged Lady Sims of 
Barrie's creation. Philip Lord's Sir Harry 
was entirely satisfactory. No doubt about 
it, "The Twelve-Pound Look" is an artistic 
treat. 

Duci de Kerekjarto, violin virtuoso, played 
"The Witches' Dance" and several of his 
own compositions, and in response to pro- 
longed applause, he played a strange and 
beautiful conception of "Home, Sweet, 
Home," which, he explained, was prompted 
by the fact that he is far from his parents 
and is very fond of San Francisco. The 



Sfl« FRAMClSCOl 



m NA«0OE*\U.t 




The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 

MATINEE DAILY 



August 18, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



man is an artist. But one has only to com- 
pare his work with what it was a year ago 
and agree with my opinion that vaudeville is 
not the place for him. 

Vincent Lopez and his jazz band made a 
lively interval; Ben Nee One, nice little Chi- 
naman, was well received; Sweeney and 
Walter were endured; Victoria and Dupree 
amused us mildly. 



Columbia. 

This week sees the close of "If Winter 
Comes" highly successful showing. A splen- 
did achievement in filming, and all praise to 
Marry Milla.dc. The Columbia stage will 
receive a visit from Frank Crane, very pop- 
ular in San Francisco, in his play, "The First 
Year," which held New Yorkers for two 
years, they say. The great, untamed West 
is not so easily held, but in all likelihood, 
the production will meet with the hearty 
approval of the Coast, where critics are kind 
and feelings are gentle. We do have better 
dispositions in California than elsewhere, and 
in no class is this more noticeable than among 
the dramatic writers. Some one said only the 
other day, "Why, you'd think all the actors 
were Tom's cousins." But I hardly think its 
fair to attribute his utter amiability to nep- 
otism, do you? 



Warfield Theater. 

"Dulcy," the delightful dumb-belle, will be 
the new screen character for Constance Tal- 
madge, commencing Saturday, August 18 at 
the Warfield Theater. 

"Dulcy is the title role of the picture 
which tells a comic story of marriage with the 
assistance of a cast including Jack Mulhall, 
Claude Gillingwater, John Harron, Ann Corn- 
wall, May Allison, Andre de Beranger, Gil- 
bert Douglas and Milla Davenport. 

While Dulcy isn't exactly a meddlesome 
wife, she completely complicates business af- 
fairs for her husband in many misdirected 
efforts to help him. The results of her 
"dulcyisms" are comic in the extreme. She 
loves her husband literally to his distrac- 
tion. 

An innovation in stage presentation also on 
this program will be "Daphne," a dance fan- 
tasy introducing "miracle scenery." The 
novelty of this stage number exists in the 
complete change of setting in five seconds by 
the use of patent lighting effects only. 

Concert numbers by Lipschultz and the 
Warfield Music Masters, other program at- 
tractions and the usual short reels are on the 
bill. 



Orpheum Theater. 

Ethel Barrymore remains for another week 
to grace the boards at the Orpheum with 
her queenly presence heading a program 
whose forte is comedy, starting Sunday Mat- 
inee, August 19th. Miss Barrymore's suc- 
cess and her popularity as the "first lady o( 
the theater" have drawn unprecedented 
crowds to the ( Hpheum during the past week 



and the hundreds who have been turned away 
will have anothei opportunity to see the ex- 
quisite actress. 

A number 'jf well-known features are in- 
cluded in the accompanying program. Joe 
Rome and Lou Gaut title their act "When 
Extremes Meet." The sensational and artist- 
ic success of Duci De Kerekjarto, the brill- 
iant genius of the violin, has caused the Or- 
pheum management to hold the virtuoso for a 
third week. Harry Hinez, who is known as 
the "58th Variety," introduces a specie of 
fun all of his own. 

Miss Laura Pierpont, the well-known le- 
gitimate actress, brings a protean novelty, an 
episode in modern social life called "Women 
Who Pass in the Night" by Edgar Allen 
Woolf. Joe Lane and Pearl Harpee ap- 
peal to the risabilities in their variety offering 
called "Bits of Wit." Lillian and Henry 
Zeigler are exponents of modern equilibrism, 
and Davis and Pelle bring an athletic act 
which requires unusual alertness and endur- 
ance. 



BROKERS WHO ARE BROKE. 

It is not so much a question as to brokers 
who are insolvent as it is of insolvency made 
much worse by dishonest methods of doing 
business. A. W. Ccote has been indicted on 
seven counts by a Los Angeles Grand Jury. 
It is charged that he, or his assistants, took 
monev which was paid into A. W. Coote and 
Co., designed to be specially used, to the per- 
sonal advantage of Coote or his assistants. 
Specifications are given, showing such im- 
proper use of money left in trust for invest- 
ment for the customer. And, if the charges 
are true, it is not improbable that the broker 
faces a long term in prison as a result of con- 
viction. 

The story is told, by the accountant hav- 
ing charge of the investigation of the books 
cf the brokerage concern, that this concern 
was practically an insolvent one last year. 
The excuse given for the failure, by the 
friends of the broker, is that the Coote con- 
cern was dragged down through the failure 
of another and a much larger brokerage 
firm, doing business in New York. The New 
Ycrk house, is said, in turn, to have failed 
because of reckless speculation in marks and 
rubles. But if the Coote outfit was insolv- 
ent last year, it is certainly not true that it 
was dragged down to failure through the like 
failure of the New York house. 

It now transpires that the Coote failure 
will run into more thin a two-million dollar 
less, for those who entrusted their money to 
this brokerage concern. The San Francisco 
News Letter hopes that the action against 
this brokerage house will be made so far- 
reaching, and so strenuously strong for pun- 
ishment, that the penalty inflicted on Coote. 
and his associates, will act as a preventive 
on others in a like line of business. It is 
only too true that the methods now in use 
in the brokerage bufi: ss simply is a means 
and an end to creal id protect thieves. 



The Circus Comes to Town. 

August 31st, September 1st and 2nd, will 
be. the days that the circus comes to town, 
at the show grounds, 12th and Market 
Streets. And such a circus! There was 
nothing like this, when we were boys! Sev- 
en hundred arenic marvels! Thirty troupes 
of performing wild animals! Fifteen hund- 
red people! Two hundred trained horses! 
One thousand zoological rarities! Isn't this 
enough to make a boy's mouth water, to say 
nothing of the rest of us? Ringling Bros, 
and Barnum & Bailey have affiliated, and 
together they make the most wonderful show 
on earth! 



GASOLINE SALES. 

When a powerful oil company, by meth- 
ods of under-selling, eventually squeezes out 
the small dealer, then the prices decided upon 
during the period of under-selling, should be 
adhered to, and there should be a law pro- 
hibiting the raising of these prices. 



Our Late 
President 



Two memorable pages, 
"A Nation's Loss" and 
"A City's Grief," show- 
ing views of the late 
President Harding from 
his arrival to his depart- 
ure from grief-stricken 
San Francisco, will ap- 
pear in next Sunday's 
Rotagravure sec- 
tion. The funeral pic- 
tures are magnificent, 
and follow the funeral 
cortege from the hotel 
to the railroad station. 



Our New 
President 



One full page is devoted 
to views of Calvin Cool- 
idge, our new President, 
showing a group picture 
of Hip President and his 
f a m i 1 y. taken at his 
father's home the day 
after the late President 
Harding's death. There 
are also studies of the 
President and Mr 

nrl a view of the 
innilpst Coolidge h o m e 
ai Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts. Kvcrvnne will 
wish to preserve a copy 
of this issue of The 



Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 18, 1923. 



SecoND spQeDS 






Questionnaire Uncovers Motor Car's 
Versatility. 

National Automobile Chamber of Com- 
merce has addressed inquiries to thousands 
of motorcar owners with a view to ascertain- 
ing the proportions of the various services 
rendered by their automobiles. Accompany- 
ing the letter to the owners is a four-color 
safety poster to be placed upon the wind- 
shield. 

With consideration of the growth of sav- 
ings deposits and home building in those 
States wherein is a large percentage of mo- 
tor vehicle registration, investment in auto- 
mobiles would appear to be a profitable ven- 
ture as well as a pleasurable one. The vari- 
ous ways in which the car serves its owner 
were found to be many and of great di- 
versity. The first was in driving to and from 
places of employment, directly, and via the 
railroad station; daily use in business came 
next with a few others in the order named; 
occasional use in business, evening driving, 
picnics, motor camping, long distance tour- 
ing, driving to church, talcing children to 
and from school, and shopping. 



Seek to Better Rubber Output in 
the Americas. 

Investigation is being pursued by the Gov- 
ernment to ascertain whether crude rubber 
can be grown in the Western Hemisphere in 
competition with the plantations of the Far 
East. The inquiry has mostly taken the 
trend of finding means of increasing the 
yield of the raw caoutchouc per tree. Ex- 
periments are being made to learn the type 
of environment best suited to the prolific 
production of the trees and enable the trees 
to attain their highest degree of development. 
Intelligent selection of the best producers is 
also being sought. Two methods of selection 
are in common use : One involves the use of 
a seed of high producing average, and the 
other the use of cuttings from thoroughbred 
trees. The second method is known as bud- 
ding. Rubber trees were generally found not 
to respond readily to this means, but a meth- 
od worked out by the United States Rubber 
Company, at its plantation in Java was found 
to be satisfactory. The main trouble en- 
countered was that fresh wounds in rubber 
trees proved to be extremely susceptible to 
the inroads of parasitic disease bacilli. Cut- 
tings are made from the best trees in the form 
of small strips of bark, containing a dor- 
mant bud. These are grafted upon a sapling 
and within a month fusion is usually accomp- 
lished. 

"H'm, so you claim the world is round," 
said the skeptical one. "How do you know 
that it is not square?" 

"Because I have had too many dealings 
with it," replied the other, grimly. — Judge. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Electricity— Its Growth and 
Worth 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 



In a liiuh class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboirc & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 5S0 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



ilniiiuj- 1866—56 Years— 1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Itiirltnrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodaide 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Franciaeo Plione Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 7 77 Valencia Street 
Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



(Continued From Page 10.) 

That the people now using electricity ap- 
preciate the value of electric labor saving ap- 
pliances is evidenced by the amount of money 
invested in them. Total sales of electrical 
appliances and merchandise for the past three 
years, together with the estimated sales for 
the year, 1923, are shown in the following 
table: 

Year Dollars 

1920 $589,315,000 

1921 652,845,000 

1922 716,375,000 

1923 875,750,000 

The figures for the year, 1923, are, of 
course, estimated, and are based on the nat- 
ural growth of the electrical industry, in- 
crease in population and the increase in new 
dwellings, etc. New dwellings are being cre- 
ated at the rate of 1,250,000 per year, and 
each new home is a customer for Majestic 
heaters and appliances. In 1922, five billion 
dollars was expended in new buildings in the 
United States. The building program for 
1923 calls for an expenditure of $7,830,- 
000,000. Almost every building (including 
public buildings, such as schools, garages, of- 
fice buildings and so forth), are prospects 
for Majestic Heaters or Appliances or both. 
The growth of the Majestic Electric Appli- 
ance Company in the past nine years has 
been phenomenal. In the next five years 
the Company will take its place as one of 
the foremost electrical manufacturers in the 
country. 



Keeping the Clutch Disengaged. 

It is necessary to depress the clutch pedal 
when applying dressing or cleaning the fric- 
tion surfaces. This usually means that one 
must disengage the clutch while the other 
applies the dressing or treatment. To simplify 
the operation, it is a good plan to force down 
the pedal by means of a stick pressed against 
the front seat and the pedal. 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 



Prompt and efficient service 
will convince you 



-A trial 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




Practice limited to 


EYE, 


EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 


Hours 


10 to 5 — By Appointment — 


Saturday 


10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Removed to Suite 537 Liebes Bldg. 




177 POST STREET 




San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Butts PreHsed hy Hand, Only — 
Salts Culled for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning; 
433 Mason St. 1'hone Franklin 2510 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Manuscript Covers 

"Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers :ire sold in similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Kstablished 1866 
S7-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teetli faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extraction!; Crown.; 
Self I It'iiMMni: Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 66 Geary Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phel.m Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Piililic 
Insurance Broter 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Talace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 695 Douglas 477 2 

Perpetual Care Fund 
On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Knameied paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1056 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVE" U8 



Tel. Fr.inMin 3fi*". 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Unrli Appertaining to Automobiles 
(>v> - \i et.vlrne U elding ltl»ck-m it 111 ng 

II. IV. I nlvr-r M. Dnberer E. Johnson 




Stopping at Hotel Oak- 
land — whether it be 
just to meet a friend or 
to spend several days — 
is always a pleasure. 
The lobbies, the dining 
rooms, the 500 attrac- 
tively furnished out- 
side rooms, are all de- 
signed for your com- 
fort. 

Excellent Quisine 
Moderate %ites 



MOT Ej*4„. 

PtKLA&R) 

-W.C.cJui-flervs Mflir-J 



HOTEL PLA7A 

JAN FRANCISCO 



65c 

Luncheon 



Good food, quiet pleasant 
surroundings and carefu' 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 




Tune in on 

the Wave-Length 

of the Mountain Breezes ! 

Spend a Week-End Vacation at 

LAKE TAHOE 

Leave Ferry any evening at 6:20. Arrive 
Tahoe next morning at 7:57. 

SWIM, GOLF, BOAT, 
FISH, HIKE— 

— enjoy yourself 

Leave Tahoe any evening at 7:10. Arrive 
San Francisco next morning at 7:50. 

Ask Agents For Further Information. 

Southern Pacific Lines 



50 Post St 



Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sutter 4000 



<9 



inner 
dances 



New Rose Room Bowl 
orchestra under direc- 
tion of 

E. MAX BRADFIELD 
Dinner dances every 
eve. except Sunday. No 
cover chg., except Sat. 
Cover chg. Sat. eve. 50c 

a hole dinner 

Jl.JO 

a perron 





Ohe 

PALACE 

HOTEL 

zManagfment 
HALSEY E.MANWARJNO 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



C alifornia Advertiser 

SAN FRANCISCO SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1923 




$5.00 PER YEAR 



OS ANGEL] 



Throw hither all your quaint enamell'd eyes 

That on the green turf suek the honied dinners, 
Anil purple all the ground with vernal flowers. — Milton. 



1 Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 



WALTER W. DERR 

,105 MONTGOMERY STREET 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1 ,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter \y74J 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable, can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be sent you on request. 

ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

SI 7-1 S California 

Bank Building 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



EJWtr*— »Wlr— *»*Ar 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital 515,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 




EiUbllthcd July 20. 10S6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




vol. cm. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF.. SATURDAY, AUGUST 25, 1923 



No. 8 



.,!"£ ^AN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER 
'ISER is printed and published every Saturday by thePropYietor 
Frederick Marriott 382 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery suets' 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Enferort „. a"° %..Hf.}? 1 



Calif.. Post Office as secondlcia^matTer """" E " tered at San Franoisc °. 
London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhil'l, E. C, England 
Suh K r i? t,0 2 Rat{, s (including postage): One year $5.00 

year. $6.00 : Canada, one year. $6.00. 



Foreign, one 



NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



—Most puritans are suffering from Freydian inhibitions. 

* * * 

— The Baldwin government seems to be troubled with quite a 
Wilsonian penchant for sending meaningless and futile notes. 

* * * 

— After the period of mourning is over, it will be "on with the 
dance" at the White House, for Mrs. Coolidge loves dancing. This 
sounds hopeful. Perhaps our Presidency isn't as Methodist as it 
looks ! 

* * * 

— We wonder who was responsible for the picture of Charmian 
London whom we have known for more than 20 years. If it was her 
picture, either the photographer or Europe has effected a complete 
transformance in her appearance. 

* * * 

— "You can have anything you want!" Elsie Benedict assures 
her audience. Well, we might want some one else's wife or hus- 
band! But you don't mind a little thing like that, do you? As 
the burglar said when he ran off with the baby. 

— If mechanics, machinists, civil engineers, etc., should suddenly 
take up some form of expression in their work, to correspond with 
"vers libre," impressionistic painting, jazz music and Rodinian 
sculpture, it might serve to depopulate the world as quickly as war. 

— We must have more traffic cops on Montgomery street. The 
absence of these officers is the only incentive that reckless drivers 
need to drive more carelessly, round corners without warning, run 
down pedestrians, blockade other cars, and generally cause trouble, 
if not disaster. Montgomery street, from California to Post streets, 

should have a cop on every corner. 

* * * 

— And so the opera season is coming round again and the audi- 
torium which has been denounced from Dan to Beersheba as no 
sort of a place for hearing music is to be refurbished and made to 
look like a real opera house, though why appearances should be 
so important is bewildering. Perhaps the performers cannot perform 
unless it does look like an opera house. They are notoriously temp- 
ermental. But a great artist— that is different. To see Chahapin 
lean out into that great barn and take each person there as it were 
to his breast and whisper to him, that was genius, in a form which 
was miraculous to behold and a delight to remember. But there 
are few simple geniuses on the operatic stage. 



—The experiment of city camps maintained in the high Sierras 
has proved very successful. They will no doubt continue on a large 
scale. It may be interesting to know that as fostering places for 
matrimony they have the usual city resorts completely beaten and 
are much more wholesome withal. One girl says that a man is much 
more amenable by a stream than in a hotel corner. 

* * * 

— We have often called attention to the condition of the Marina, 
and we are going to keep it up. At one time the letters on a 
Shell Oil tank on the water front were placed in such a position 
that from one vantage point on a steamer coming into the har- 
bor, a visitor read it, minus the "S." When asked what he thought 
of San Francisco, he gave a disgusted look at the water front along 
the Marina, and answered, pointing to the sign: "That says it." 

* v * 

— We are told by one of the greatest moving picture producers 
in California that when "Cleopatra" was taken into Pennsylvania 
the censors refused to permit the exhibition of the film, unless An- 
thony and Cleopatra were married! Shades of Patrick Henry! Also 
of Anthony Comstock! Why didn't they insist that all the audi- 
ence be married also? That opens up an interesting train of thought. 
Imagine: Harry invites Harriet to the movies, and Harriet refuses 
because they aren't married! A fall off of movie ticket sales, what? 

— And now, after being criticized severely and contemptuously 
by Britain and Europe for our "splendid isolation" policy, a Cana- 
dian publication writes in favor of it for England. Personally, we 
cannot see it working out satisfactorily for the "tight little isle." 
In the first place, its geographical position is too close to Europe 
for a period of comfortable peace to exist for any length of time; 
then again, England is more the nucleous of many countries, rather 
than a country in itself. It is absolutely dependent on its colonies 
for existence, both physically and spiritually. As Kipling says: 

"He little knows of England, who only England knows." 

* * * 

— In a small Southern California paper published weekly, we 
read one of the most daring editorials that has come to our atten- 
tion for some time. The subject was the sermon preached by a 
San Francisco pastor for President Harding, on the day the Presi- 
dent's body was shipped East, taking to task the clergyman for 
blaming the occurrence upon God, and the publication which 
printed it verbatim, without questioning the false dogma, for keep- 
ing the public in ignorance and superstition. To quote a para- 
graph: "The journalist is the product of an enlightened scientific 
age, and therefore cannot plead ignorance as an excuse for giv- 
ing endorsement to the false dogmas of the preacher. The average 
man and woman, uninfluenced by priestly logic, would repudiate 
all the old superstitutions." We need more editorials of this sort, 
while yet in an interim of comparative un-muzzlement; before the 
next war plunges us into the slough of censorship. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 




It must be the silly season for the papers are 
Coeducation Twaddle beginning to call attention to a statement 

made by H. G. Wells to the effect that co- 
education tends to the effeminacy of the male. Our local Bulletin, 
taking up the fight, says that is all nonsense because the American 
troops fought well. Which does not meet the case, for of course the 
vast body of American troops do not know anything at all about co- 
education during or after the adolescent period, which is the only 
period that can count. You see, it must be the silly season really, as 
we are being drawn into the argument much against our will. But 
apropos of all this. Lord Robert Cecil speaking on this matter the 
ether da y in t he -House of-Commons, said that it was quite inconceiv- 
able that the violent arguments and intellectual disputes which de- 
veloped the male of the university to such an extent, during his col- 
lege life, could have taken place in the company of woman. There is 
quite a point there. Trie mere physical bravery figures little — who is 
to say that women are not equally brave? But the essence lies in an 
extra strength, and so to speak, virility, which can only be developed 
in conflict with one's kind, that is to say one's own sex. 



Nine years ago the German Empire stood 
Great Babylon Is Falling as one of the great achievements of the 

century. Pre-eminent in science, and 
notable in art, with great industries and noble accomplishments in 
all fields of human endeavor, it stood or seemed to stand as a neces- 
sary part of the eternal scheme of things and a permanent contribu- 
tion to the culture of the present age. Now it is crumbling. The em- 
pire has gone and has been succeeded by men who have not yet been 
able to exercise the amount of control and strength which they should 
have shown. But no one short of St. Michael himself, could have so 
directed the forces of Germany in contact with the forces arrayed 
against it in such a way as to have brought order where chaos was 
predetermined, and where the victors had decided that the nation 
must either die or live in a state of helotry. 

It is obvious that the Germans have decided not to be helots. The 
non-resistance campaign in the Ruhr which sprang spontaneously 
from the masses themselves shows that. Close on a hundred men, 
women and children, civilians, have been shot and fifty thousand 
people have been deported, thrown out of their houses with their few 
household goods piled in the street, frequently with the tears of the 
French soldiers who carried out the orders. And still the non- 
resistance does not cease, and any German chancellor who recom- 
mended its cessation would meet his death by assassination in a few 
hours. 

Now, it is very clear that this state of things can not go on. The 
Reich can not stand the strain and it is doubtful if the victors can 
stand the strain either, for the French franc goes down into un- 
dreamed of depths, as the mark goes into oblivion. So that the Ger- 
man people have evidently made up their minds to prefer chaos. The 
recent events, the plundering of the stores, the freeing of prisoners, 
the attacks on the police, the massing of crowds, are all very signifi- 
cant and more significant of a people which is in its very essence, a 
law-abiding people, which respects authority and rather likes to be 
ordered about. The break-up is beginning, and it is a break-up 
which will involve all Central Europe, and which will pass like wild- 
fire through the new states which the idealists have created, as if 
they were entities, whereas they are merely pasteboard. 



A chaotic Germany may easily mean Berlin in possession of the 
French, and then the vultures will gather and Europe will have lost 
all the gains of two hundred years and be back again in the period 
before the alleviating discoveries of modern science tended to miti- 
gate the bareness of life. But even so, Europe is not dead. She has 
been very ill many times before, and has arisen strengthened by her 
sufferings. 



We should like to know the truth of the 
The Blind and the Governor accusations which are constantly being 

made that the present state govern- 
ment is particularly hard upon the blind. It keeps coming up, and 
the papers are at times full of the account of the deprivation of vital 
things to the blind because of the new economic policy at Sacra- 
mento. For example, it has been said that two home teachers of the 
blind have been put out of business because there are not enough 
funds under the present system to keep them going. We understand 
that politics are not pleasant things, and we do not want to be unjust 
to anybody, nor to accept ex parte statements as being complete. But 
if this is the case and that our great and rich state can not afford 
to make life comfortable for the blind, we want to know it. There is 
not a person in this state of ordinary intelligence and decency who 
would not willingly go without something to help the blind, and all 
of us will be indignant that our government should in any way tend 
to make the lives of these unfortunate and, generally speaking, very 
worthy, and in many cases delightful people, more hard than nature 
or misfortune has made it. We are for the blind every time, and no 
matter how much we may respect the governor or approve of his 
policies as a whole, we should not tolerate for a moment the policy 
of economy which was at the expense of any of our blind people. 



Really, a mere appropriation of twenty-five mil- 
The Air Service lions is very little for the air-force of this coun- 
try. It should be granted without a moment's 
hesitation and General Patrick is almost too modest in suggesting 
that amount. He would have done better to have asked for more; 
for in face of that smail amount the real urgency of the matter will 
not appeal to the people and it may be refused for lack of public 
interest. There is no doubt at all that the air service must be culti- 
vated very speedily, for the onus of war is fast coming to be laid 
upon the airplane. That does not mean that airplanes will win wars; 
it is very doubtful if wars can be won apart from the manipulation 
of large bodies of men. But the airplane becomes more and more 
essential and it is increasingly evident that if airplanes can not win 
wars, yet war may easily be lost for lack of airplanes. That accounts 
for the enormous appropriation of $800,000,000 which Great Britain 
has made for planes this year and it also accounts for the vast air- 
plane armament of France. Of course, it may be argued that the air- 
plane is as yet more or less of an experiment and that it has not been 
determined, as to the best type. That is very true, but one can not 
wait until types are perfected, for nations will fight with imperfect 
weapons and those who have none will be made miserable thereby. 
Better airplanes and more of them is what we need. 



They say that the farmer planted too much 
The New Competitor wheat and that is the reason of the fall in 

prices. All right, he will plant less next year 
and next year prices will rise? Do you think so? What fixes the 
price of American farmers' wheat? The price of wheat at Liverpool, 
which bases its price upon the wheat supply of the world. And the 
wheat supply of the world is increasing so that the American farmer 
is not going to have the advantage of the wheat market which he 
has had subsequently to the war. This year the Russian crop may, if 
conditions do not change, or there is no upset by natural causes, 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



reach the amount of a billion and a half bushels, which is equal to 
about the very good years prior to the war and the revolution. That 
amount or the part of that amount which can be spared thrown on 
the world market will bring down the price of wheat again with a run, 
and the prospects of wheat farming will be quite blue in this part of 
the world. For we have had the cream of the wheat times and the 
virgin prairie has been a matron for quite a while now, and really 
should have a bit of a rest. We saw the wheat industry die out of 
California, not without suffering to many individuals, but on the 
whole to our advantage. It may be that the new conditions will not 
be as hard on us as we think, and that the farmer may pull through 
better than the superficial conditions would seem to imply. 



The expositions of local industries which have 
Local Expositions been instituted throughout the country are grad- 
ually assuming a shape in which they can be 
used for the advance of the community, as a whole, in artistic as well 
as purely mechanical development. They have become fixed in the 
system and it would not be possible to do without them now. Like 
many other things of a similar kind, they began on a scale and with 
a purpose which provoked the contemptuous criticism of the self- 
appointed connoisseur on art and manners. "They are only combina- 
tions of tradesmen to sell their wretched wares," he would say. And 
so it appeared. But the mere exposition of these wares to the public 
for inspection brought in its train an open rivalry with respect to the 
appearance of the goods and their honesty apart from their purely 
utilitarian qualities. And so we have a very distinct and definite im- 
provement in the esthetic as well as the utilitarian qualities of the 
goods produced. This is an ordinary method of progression under 
our system, where what appears at first to be merely egotistic and 
competitive turns out in the long run to be really societal and col- 
lective. Thus these local industrial expositions should be well patron- 
ized and, as a matter of fact, they are. All the space for the Novem- 
ber exposition has been taken up in advance and we shall no doubt 
make another leap ahead as regards quality and appearance. 




By ANTISTHENES 

Extreme chauvinism destroys rather than sustains nationalism. 



What often makes for spiritual unsuccess in the flock is the ma- 
terial success of the shepherd. 



Good manners is a succession of artful deceptions. Would that 
more might endeavor to deceive. 



It has been the habit for rulers on their acces- 
An Act Of Grace sion to mark their reign by a show of clem- 
ency. If there is any idea on the part of Mr. 
Coolidge of emulating this fine example, we call his attention to 
the cases of the so-callled "political prisoners" at Leavenworth. They 
are hang-overs from the war and about twenty in number. They 
are the only persons in the world now being punished for anti- 
government activities during the war. The war prisoners of other 
countries were released at the latest in 1919. None of our prisoners 
have committed any overt offense against the government; they, at 
the most, were a nuisance. When we think of the great strikes on 
the Clyde, and in South Wales during critical periods of the war and 
note that leaders of those strikes are now members of parliament 
and constitute His Majesty's Opposition, our persistent imprisonment 
of our weak war-opponents is rather contemptible. Thousands ot 
influential citizens have asked for clemency for these men. and no 
less than fifty bishops of the Episcopalean Church have signed a 
petition, as well as many Catholics. Jews and other conservat.ve 
people. We think it would be a gracious act on the part of the new 
president to take this matter up. 

-Nothing in the world like publicity is there? A few notes in 
the newspapers, the fashion set by Senator Phelan and the Mayor 
and all at once the town blooms into b,g hats and small men 
strain desperately under the superincumbent load. At any f rate 
it is better than the Don Peralta craze in Oakland, with its foobsh 
black tiles or the las. year whisker-craze in Sacramento which made 
the town look like a scene from Carmen, with a poor setting. But 
where do the hatters get their pull? 



To achieve success we climb a way, each stair of which is the 
broken hope of one less fortunate. 



Indecent and public excavating of the Digit Extremities is rapidly 
becoming an American outdoor pastime. 



'Twixt absolute insanity and reasonable saneness is a middle state 
wherein most of humanity functions immune. 

Successful married life is better obtained by recollecting one's 
cwn faults rather than by reviewing one's own virtues. 

During a national sorrow the morbid, the newspaper, the curious 
and flag vendor have equal opportunity for hypocrisy. 



If politicians were subjected to examination as to their abilities — 
ether than oratory and Taurus throwing — it might make the country 
safer for democracy. 

With the disappearance of Frank Dereaux and the jailing of Mc- 
Donough the newspapers will be hard pressed to provide scandalous 
reading for the coming election. 



On the day of President Harding's funeral there passed away in a 
small eastern town a widow whose two sons had been killed in the 
great war — "Not a drum was heard, not a funeral note — 



The ludicrous "travelling incognito" of the Prince of Wales re- 
minds one of the ostrich's burying its head to avoid detection — only, 
the bird believes in its efficacy. 



Exploration, in public, of the Great Oral Cavity by a tribe working 
with small lumber probes still goes on unabated. So far legislators 
have framed no laws regulating this. 



Apparently, all we have gotten out of all the oratory anent the 
end of war is the logical move to amend the fifth commandment 
to: Thou shalt not kill— except according to rule! 



Undertaker Arthur Roller is sentenced to serve several days in 
county jail for speeding. Perhaps Judge O'Brien opined this recreant 
motorist might have been out stimulating trade. 



Has the quantity of matronly women thronging the mah jongg 
courses in our department stores any bearing on the county clerk s 
report that 4.358 San Francisco divorces were granted last year? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 



I 

Why Los Angeles Will Be Greater than San Francisco 

I By CHARLES F. GALLAGHER. Industrial Engineer 







isssssKSSSssESSS-gE 




Franco Slf^F^JS! ^ ° f * seT ™. ot "''"''f 8 on h San g |orious P h y sical and geographical attractions, with its sunny beaches, 

r<iancisto ana ban Francisco business conditions by the author, . i_ J J J i 1 i n ■ ■ , , ■„ ■ 

who will discuss the various phases ot industry each week, i lts nundred and one nooks around the Bay, its vista of hills, its quaint 

Chinatown, its soft, seductive fragrance of city flower stands and 

WHY is Los Angeles? This question has been discussed at great teaut ' ru ' shops that appeals to that lazy instinct in all of us to say, 

length by many students of civic growth and learned writers "Now that we have worked, let us play," and in between our accom- 

who have studied the constant progress of our southern metropolis to P"shments we rest, look back and reminisce. 

such an extent that it needs little addition from any other pen to ^' tn ^ os Angeles there is no such thing as reminiscence. Los 

justify the present position of Los Angeles or to state the reasons of Angeles makes today a measuring post for the accomplishments of 

its mammoth growth. tomorrow. Los Angeles thinks and lives civically. San Francisco 

On the ether hand, San Francisco, while not equally as well known thinks and lives individually — that is why San Francisco is cosmo- 

nationally, still has a large place in the life of fact and fiction through politan. 



the printed page and has served as the inspiration of many a writer 
in his description of its quaint, alluring, indefinable charm that every 
San Franciscan knows and feels. 

The writer of this article is a San Franciscan by preference. There 
is no other city or town in the United States wherein he would rather 
live or have his home. 



San Francisco has a great potentiality. Los Angeles also has the 
potentiality, but Los Angeles keeps a peak load on its industrial 
potentiality every hour of the day, while San Francisco has a surplus 
which, like the unharnessed white water of electricity, if unused goes 
to waste, never to be reclaimed. 

Its civic satisfaction or industrial inertia is cramping the develop- 



In recent metropolitan dailies we have witnessed the efforts of two ment °f San Francisco. Industries that should and ought to be lo- 

writers, one in Los Angeles from San Francisco, the other in San cated in San Francisco drift into our city and out through our gates 

Francisco coming from Los Angeles, each writing his impressions of to Los Angeles, where they are met with open arms. One is reminded 

the sister city and having these impressions printed side by side. °f tne story where a colored gentleman and his wife were seated on a 

Going deeper beyond the mere question of impressions, which in porch, the wife in a rocking chair facing the street and the colored 
many cases are partially deceptive, one can take Los Angeles and gentleman lying on the floor facing the wall of his house. A big pro- 
San Francisco and view them with an impartial eye through the lens cession was passing and the colored lady commenced to describe the 
of an industrial magnifying glass and find the facts and reasons that tremendous embellishments of this great funeral train, the greatest 
will justify the assertion that Los Angeles will be a far greater city procession, she told her husband, that had ever passed through town, 
than San Francisco in the years to come, if the general basic indus- She described the mourning carriages, the hearse, the people at great 



trial conditions now existing are permitted to exist in San Fran- 
cisco and the present progress of Los Angeles is maintained with its 
accustomed vigor, of which there is no sign of an abatement. 

In using the term industrial, it is taken in the large, broad sense 
covering the field of industry, banking, wholesale, retail, civic and 
commercial activities and not in any sense a labor question. As a 
matter of fact, in looking for alibis and excuses, many business men 
are prone to take the labor situation, which is merely one element 



length while her husband kept asking her for more and more details. 
Finally, as the procession passed and went out of sight, he said to 
her: "What a pity I was lying down facing the wall!" 

If San Francisco would roll over, sit up and take notice, we would 
know more about the procession of events and the march of progress 
than we do at present, being content to sit and listen to Miss Los 
Angeles telling us what is happening by doing it herself, and then 
telling the world in addition as good measure. Of our wealth there 



of the condition, and distort and magnify it as an alibi in many cases is no doubt. Of our stability there is no doubt. But we have got to 



for inefficient management, poor organization and lack of foresight, 
which, if they were remedied, would dispel the dismal gloom of in- 
dustrial troubles far more quickly than long-winded harangues by 
boards and committees who are selected to solve a problem, while in 
many instances the constituted members of the board have no idea 
of the obsequistaties. You will walk out on tiptoe and with hushed 

Speaking of labor questions in San Francisco has always been a 
touchy subject with many industrialists, but that is one of San Fran- 
cisco's pet troubles, the avoidance of problems by talking about them 
in such a manner as to offend nobody, instead of digging in and 
solving them. 

If one were to place one's finger upon the strongest reason for the 
relatively slow industrial progress of San Francisco compared to that 
of Los Angeles, it could be named in one sentence. 

San Francisco is satisfied. 

San Francisco is satisfied, and the moment an individual, firm, an 
industry or a city becomes satisfied, progress ceases and development 
is cramped. 

San Francisco has done great things. San Francisco will always 



stop looking and living in what we have done or we are liable to rest. 
San Francisco is so conservative in some things that she leans over 
backwards. 

Go to any banker in San Francisco with a new industrial project 
cr a proposed development whether it be of one thousand dollars 
or ten million and discuss with him in enthusiastic terms the building 
of plants, the hum of factories, the roar of machinery, the large pay- 
rolls, and if you have managed to retain his attention for fifteen min- 
utes you will have come to the conclusion in many cases that you 
are making detailed arrangements for a funeral of something dear 
to you and the banker will probably do nothing to mar the solemnity 
of the obsequies. You will walk out on tiptoe and with hushed 
voice. 

This does not refer to the discouragement of fly-by-night schemes 
of oil stocks and the industrial cats and dogs that every city frowns 
on, but to solid ventures which, while possibly speculative — for noth- 
ing that is ever developed is without speculation, business itself being 
one of the biggest speculations in the world — will eventually develop 
nto large, solid enterprises. Go into Los Angeles with a new indus- 



continue to do great things. But perhaps it is the combination of the try; enlist the sympathy or support of even the local barber or boot- 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



black and you will begin to believe, or at least be made to think, thai 
the entire population of the City of Los Angeles had reared its 
city and built itself into an organization for the sole purpose of re- 
ceiving you and your proposed industrial into its bosom. What is 
more, after it absorbs you it sees that you absorb it, its policies, its 
enthusiasm and its progress, and you join the grand cavalcade of 
the "Come South" movement, with that enthusiasm that seems to 
emanate from the very soil itself the moment your feet cross the 
Tehachapi. 

As a typical example: A group of young men who had worked 
for three years with a very large project and had taken it until it 
became almost dog-eared and worn, from bank to bank, from bond 
house to bond house, from capital group to capital group in San 




HEtfRD IT? 



— Mr. and Mrs. Jones quarreled. In desperation Jones consulted 
his spiritual adviser. The gentleman of the church considered the 
situation carefully and then asked: 

"How long since you have taken her a box of flowers?" 

"Quite a while; ten years maybe." 



"Well, that's the answer. When you go home tonight, take a 
Francisco and were laughed at and ridiculed but, as one of the group dozen roses with you. Surprise her." 
said, even ridicule showed at least an expression, which was difficult At six-thirty that evening Jones proudly laid the roses on the table 

to obtain from some of their audience. An easterner, sojourning in ' n h° nt of Mrs. Jones and waited to fold her in his arms. Instead she 



our city, happened to have his attention called to this matter. He 
took it and moved with it to New York and moved back to the tune 
of ten million dollars. The latest developments are that the enter- 
prising new business departments of the banks of our city were as- 
siduously calling upon these people to get them to place their ac- 
counts in the banks which, before they had made their success, could 
hardly afford them an audience. 

These statements may seem to be exaggerated, but they are the 
result of hundreds of cases wherein the parties having failed to re- 
ceive a welcome in San Francisco have moved to Los Angeles and 
have become very successful, disproving the theory that the project 
was faulty, but rather confirming our lack of industrial vision and 
failure to recognize opportunity when it knocks. 

There is value in being conservative, but in choosing between an 
optimist who overreaches himself and a pessimist who underestimates 
everything, give us the optimist at all times. The Los Angeles atti- 
tude can best be explained by the statement that a Los Angelan 
made at a recent civic banquet in San Francisco. He was asked the 
question: "What would San Francisco be if it was in the hands of 
the people who made Los Angeles, and what would Los Angeles be 
if the conditions were reversed?" 

His answer was: "If the Los Angelans had settled in San Fran- 
cisco there would be no Los Angeles, because, as San Franciscans, 
we would have taken in with your wonderful geographical advan- 
tages so much territory that the present Los Angeles would be a part 
of San Francisco." 

That illustrates their attitude. There is nothing too big to tackle. 
There is nothing too small to notice. There is room for every indus- 
try and there is industry for every location. Los Angeles' job is 
bringing them together and welding them in place. San Francisco is 
content to let them rest in the hope that they will grow together. To 
sum up, the respective city slogans tell the story: "San Francisco 
Knows How." "Los Angeles Shows How." 



SPORTSMEN REPORT GOOD FISHING AND HUNTING 
ALONG THE COAST 

Fishing was good along many Pacific Coast streams during the List 
week, and deer are reported to be plentiful this year in the vicinity 
of Sisson, the season opening in that district on September I. Sisson 
also reports that, with clear, warm weather, local fishermen have 
been reporting good catches. Reports from Bass Lake, Madera 
County, state quite a few limits of good-sized brook trout still are 
being caught in the streams, with a good many eastern brook trout 
running up to twelve inches being taken. Bass fishing in the lake is 
fairly good, but few limits are being taken. Cisco reports that fishing 
is fairly good in the Yuba River and that some limits are being 
caught. 



burst out crying. 

"There," she said. "I just knew something else would happen. 
Johnny fell off a ladder and broke his arm, and Janet got sent home 
from school with the mumps, and as if that wasn't enough, here you 
come home drunk!" 

# ¥ * 

— A certain eminent literary man called one day to see another. 
"Read that," said the host, thrusting a manuscript into his guest's 
hand. "It's my latest short story, and I want you to tell me what you 
think of it." To his surprise, a few minutes later he saw his visitor 
wiping tears from his eyes, and was still more astonished when he 
said, "My dear fellow, this is really the most pathetic thing you've 
done." "Pathetic!" gasped the other. "Whatever do you mean? I 
wrote it as humorously as I could." He grabbed the manuscript back 
and started to read it. "Oh, I see," he said, "it's my mistake. I've 
given you the wrong thing. This is my letter to the income tax com- 
missioners asking for some reduction." 
* * * 

— A certain well-known clergyman tells the following: One day 
while he was writing in his study, the door opened and his five-year- 
cld daughter walked in. "What are you writing, daddy?" she asked. 
"I am writing a sermon, my dear," he replied. "How do you know 
what to write?" she queried. "God tells me," he said. For a few 
minutes she watched him solemnly, then remarked, "Daddy, if God 
tells you what to write, why do you scratch some of it out?" 

— A country farmer walked into the general store in the village. 
"I want," said he, "that tub of margarine and that bacon and all 
the other foodstuffs." 

"Good gracious!" said the recently bereaved widow who kept the 
store, "Whatever do you want with all them things, Mr. Giles?" 

"I dunno," replied the worthy farmer, "but you know I'm the 
executor of your husband's will, and Lawyer Stiles said I was to be 
sure and carry out all the provisions." 




MARY HERETH CAROLINE JONES 

Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2 : 30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 



'*ZZ£ l V i 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY.' 

NEW YORK 



■Tht> Largest Fire Insurance Company in 
America" 

FIRE. AUTOMOBILE. WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



LIBERAL CONTRACTS 



REASONABLE RATES 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 




THE INARTICULATE 

By Charles Hanson Towne 
We who love song — and yet can make no sound; 

We who are dumb when singers fill the earth. 
What of our thoughts when thrilling notes resound. 
What of our dreams when the great Word is found 

That lifts us to heaven? . . . Are we of little worth? 

We who love wonder and dreams — and yet are mute; 

We who are passionate for swift tides of song, 
Climbing to God from the tree's deepest root, 
Yearning for star-dust and Love's highest fruit. 

Pity us, singers, when the years are long. 

Yet somewhere and somehow we too shall sing, 

Proudly articulate in far-distant spheres. 
But now, in our silence, only we bring 
Great understanding — oh, no little thing! — 

And hark! in the darkness, our desperate tears. 

— From "Scribner's" 



PEDANT 

By Paul Tanaquil 
Pelican-like he wags his greyish head. 
His raised arms flap together like wings of birds, 
Perhaps he dreamed once — now his dream is dead. 
Choked while he grubbed in tomes for roots of words. 
So as through lexicons his fingers roam 
Bent on philology, he has forgot 
How crimson roses flamed through ancient Rome 
Or what slim lilies shone in Camelot. 

— From "Voices." 



MIRACLE 

By Virginia Lyne Tunstall 
Dusk, with no word upon her lips but peace. 

Dawn, with a child-like promise in her eyes. 
Sweet miracles of beauty's fashioning. 

Who writes these wonders in the daily skies. 

Ah, magic hand, whose subtle fingers weave 
Afresh each day the fabric of her dream, 

Whose sweep across the lute of common things 
Builds a new harmony upon an ancient theme. 
— From "The Nomad." 



COVENANT 

By Dorothy Dow 
When I am gone, when 1 am dead, 

And wait no more with songs for you, 
Leave then my bed to moss and mold — 

Forget me, all the winter through. 

But make one yearly journey hence 
To see, with each renascent spring. 

Blue violets that take the place 
Of songs I may not sing. 

— From "Poetry." 



COFFEE GROUNDS AND CAMP FIRES (THERE'S A REASON) 

By RANGER BILL, U. S. Forest Service 

"It's plumb surprising how many careless people there is in this 
world," said Ranger Bill, as he pulled the saddle off his steaming 
horse and turned him loore in the corral. "And ignorant, too, 'bout 
little things, when they're in the woods. You can believe it or not, 
but I'm giving it to you straight that just common, ordinary coffee 
grounds is the cause of more fires in this National Forest than most 
anything else. 

"You see it's this way," continued the ranger, as he lit his old briar 
and puffed away thoughtfully. "Most people that live in the cities 
think we folks up here in the mountains are — well, kind of 'know- 
nothings.' I admit that when we go down to town we do kind of shy 
at the trolley cars, and seme of us don't know whether the mez- 
zanine floor is upstairs or down, but somehow we manage to get 
around without getting lost, and I've noticed that our money is still 
at par." 

"But you take Mr. City Man and put him up here in the 'tall 
uncut' and the shoe's on the other foot. To him anything that's not 
paved is 'a bear of a road'; his folks are 'fraid of snakes and wild 
animals where there ain't none, and when it comes to north, south, 
east and west, why, they just naturally look alike to him. He's 
mighty glad then to have a ranger tell him where and how to go to 
camp and fish and hunt. And we're more than willing to do it, too, 
because that's part of our job. 

"Then ccmes the morning after. A good night's sleep out in the 
open and a hearty breakfast makes the world look pretty bright and 
smiling to the city folks. Everyone's packing up and anxious to be 
cff. Mr. City Man bustles around to see that he hasn't left anything. 
His eye lights on a sign on a tree: 'Put Out Your Camp Fire.' He 
stops and scratches his head. The creek's a long way off, and the 
shovel, if he has one, stowed away in the car. He looks at the fire. 
The coffee pot! Eureka! He rushes over and pours the dregs and 
the coffee grounds over the smouldering coals, kicks in a little dirt, 
and is gone. 

"After that? Well, it's mostly a race between the morning breeze 
and Buck and me to see who'll get to the fire first. Sometimes we 
win; today we lost, and there ain't no camp ground there any more. 
But I'm still living in hopes that some day we'll be able to educate 
people that coffee grounds won't put out a fire. It takes water and 
lots of it, and a heap of real earth, not rotten wood and needles. If 
you ever go into the mountains here's a good motto to carry under 
your hat: 'Be sure your camp fire is dead, then bury it!' " 



THE CIRCUS IS HERE! 

Barnum & Bailey are names to conjure with, ever since we were 
able to toddle, and now, when this great circus company has 
joined forces with another big name like Ringling Bros, this com- 
bination of clever actors and actresses, trained animals, side shows, 
arenic marvels and zoological curiosities, cannot be beaten, any- 
where on earth. 



Attractive Apartment 
TO LET 

Four sunny outside rooms. Unfurnished. 
Every modern convenience. Hardwood 
floors. Centrally located. 940 Jones St., 
near Bush. References required. 



August 25, 1923 AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 9 

GOLDFIELD COMING TO THE FRONT AGAIN ONE STREET CAR SYSTEM NEEDED MORE THAN 

By HERMAN ZADIG EXTENSIONS 

BUSINESS in the San Francisco Stock Exchange during the past ^ f ' er * P rolon 8 ed fi 8 nt . «" ie d °n by the Sunset Development 

week has been very dull, the only feature being the rise in , Trans P° rtatlon Association for the Duboce Tunnel, the Board 

Myra. It has been reported that the Myra acquired a very rich gold Supervisors has adopted the recommendations of the special 

property in Nevada near Winnemucca. Judging from the buying committee favoring the Eureka Valley bore, and has deferred ac- 

orders, by those familiar with the new property they must think ^°" °" the P ro P osed Duboce Tunnel for a period of four months, 

well of it. Gold properties are all very much in demand at present Theodore Sava S e ' attorney for this Association, states that the Eu- 

It is a good time to buy silver mining shares now. The producers y tUn " e ' at beSt WOuld be a makeshift and would af- 



of silver will meet at Reno on the 4th of September to try and form 
a silver purchasing association, to fix the price on silver that will 
revive many silver mines. 

Senator Pittman and Senator Oddie, both of Nevada, seem to 
feel very confident that something will be accomplished, to bene- 
fit the silver mining industry. 

The Silver Pick has taken a one year working bond and lease 
on 4 claims near McLaughlin Wells, owned by the Central Gold- 
field Mining Co. This is the second company that has taken hold 
of a property east of Goldfield, the Keawanas being the first. 

From all reports the outlook is promising to develop something 
of value. The Silver Pick is making good progress, unwatering 
their shaft down to the 1100 foot level. On the 1100 foot level 
the Silver Pick will develop the west vein, which they struck about 
150 west from their shaft. This vein is likely to be the main vein 
of the district. 

Between the sinking of the deep mines shaft and the Silver Pick 
working in their own shaft, Goldfield is likely to come to the front 
again, and create activity in mining shares at the Exchange. 



SAN FRANCISCO WILL HAVE NEW ICE FACTORY 

Something new to San Francisco in the shape of an ice factory 
which manufactures ice without the use of ammonia, will soon be 
evolved, under the management of E. W. Crellin, president of the 
Western Vacuum Ice Company. The ice will be produced by the 
vacuum process, which is new to this Coast, but has been used suc- 
cessfully in the Middle West for some time. Ice manufactured in 
this way lasts longer, is produced in one hour, as against 40 to 72 
hours by ammonia and is absolutely pure. 

Mr. Crellin, who heads this new company, will be remembered 
as the manager of the Morgan Oyster Company, in which capacity 
he served for many years. Other officers are G. R. Wilcoxon, vice- 
president; Thornhill Carmany, treasurer. Offices have been opened 
in the Mills Bldg. 



ford no relief to the people of the Sunset district in the matter of 
direct transportation between their homes and the downtown busi- 
ness section, and characterized it as one which merely would be 
used by the people of the Mission and Eureka Valley districts for 
Sunday and holiday excursions to Golden Gate park. So that this 
extension, if the above statement by Mr. Savage is correct, is 
merely an additional expense to the tax payers of the district 
through which the route is built, and will not be an acquisition to 
the transportation facilities of the city. 

However this may be, it would seem to us that the energy, time 
and money which are being thrown into different campaigns for 
proposed extensions, might be used to better advantage in com- 
bining to fight for a street car system under one management and 
control, and that control a municipal one. 

San Francisco is growing at a rapid rate, and it has but one 
cutlet in which to grow; that is, down the Peninsula. The growth 
of a suburb depends upon the comfort and convenience of its trans- 
portation facilities, and we maintain that at present the transfer 
system of San Francisco is neither comfortable nor convenient. One 
is in a hurry, say, to get to San Mateo, and is not conversant with 
our unique street car organization; you hop on the first Market 
street car, which happens to be a Municipal, expecting to trans- 
fer to the Peninsula line; grap your transfer, only to be told that 
it is no good on the San Mateo cars. Or say, you are trying to get 
from the 3rd and Townsend street depot to Parkside or some other 
out-lying district. You take an Ellis street or a Third street car, 
and find that they do not transfer to the Municipal. This is espe- 
cially hard upon the stranger within our gates, who is apt to be 
impatient with our antiquated methods, and is not blessed with 
the proverbial good natured disposition of the ordinary San Fran- 
ciscan. It might be a good idea to forget extensions for awhile 
and boost for a city-owned street car system, under one manage- 
ment. 



AT THE HOTEL PLAZA 

That the excellent seven course dinner served from 6 to 8, at 
the Hotel Plaza, Stockton and Post streets, has an appeal to the 
discriminating diner, is proved by the large attendance every eve- 
ning. Eddie Harkness and his excellent orchestra add to the at- 
traction of the courteous service and splendid cuisine. 



TO CELEBRATE 80TH BIRTHDAY 

On August 28th at Hotel Richelieu Samuel Meyer will celebrate 
his 80th birthday with a dinner and reception. For the occasion 
elaborate plans and preparations are being made. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Meyer, who for years were residents of Healdsburg, have for 
the past few years made Hotel Richelieu their home and have many 
San Francisco friends. 



Boyes Hot Springs 

45 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. \V. P. R . R. 

Beautiful New Goll Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing, Mineral Baths. Hot anil Cold 

Swimming Pools. Movies 

Fur particulars write 

l! B. UCHTENBERG, Boyes Springs, 

Or Peok-.ludah. 67S Market 

San Francisi o, Cat. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Basil Street 

Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 



TAHOE 

The Gem Lake of America 

ROUND TRIP, $16.50 

Vi 1 tin Scenic Daylight Way. 

Leave San Francisco 7:2<> A. M. 

1.11111 h PlacerriUe 
Arrive Lake Xahoe 6:00 P. ML 

San Francisco -Sacramento 
Railroad 

and PIERCE-ARROW STAGE 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 




By KEM 

THERE are so many women novelists in Great Britain today, 
doing such diverse original work that an article by Bessie Gra- 
ham in a late Publisher's Weekly will be of interest to numerous 
readers. The following cullings have been borrowed from it for 
this column: 

"Not only do the (English) women not write like men, they do 

not even write like each other Dorothy Richardson does the 

most unusual work of all. Her books are such a departure from 
the ordinary, and their queerness is so pronounced, it is to be ex- 
pected that much reading of her should lead to much imitation 

A critic has written: 'Her books are not novels, they are studies 
of herself in the form of fiction.' Her last book DEADLIGHT came 
out in 1921. 

Published by Knopf, $2. 



"Elizabeth Robins first made a name for herself as an actress, 
an interpreter of Ibsen character. She left the stage to take up novel 
writing. Among her books there are two stories of adventure which 
are very remarkable for a woman to have written, THE MAGNETIC 

NORTH and COME AND FIND ME Her latest novel, TIME IS 

WHISPERING, is a poetic story of a love that comes late in life 
to a couple who find that their happiest years are their later years." 

Published by Harpers, $2. 



"Sheila Kaye-Smith writes less like a woman than any woman 
that has ever written. . . . The only woman contemporary who ap- 
proaches her is Elinor Mordaunt who has the male love of deeds 
rather than words." Her last novel, JOANNA GODDEN, was pub- 
lished in 1922. 

Published by Dutton, $2. 



"May Sinclair is the most ultra-modern of novelists in her thought 
and interests. . . . THE DIVINE FIRE is the one book of May Sin- 
clair's that everybody likes. . . . Each new book is a fresh experi- 
ment in some modern vein of thought. . . . The new psychology dom- 
inates the later books, notably the last one, ANNE SEVERN AND 

THE FIELDINGS." 

Published by Macmillan Co., $2. 



"E. M. Delafield is the pen name for Elizabeth Monica de la 
Pasture. . . . Her first novel is a study of egoism in a young person. 
THE WAR-WORKERS is a story of woman's part in the war. THE 
PELICANS deals with the lives of two sisters, one of whom enters 
a convent. . . . HUMBUG is a study of the cant and pretension in 
a girl's education and THE HEEL OF ACHILLES is a masterly 
study of the relations of a mother and daughter. They are all very 
usual novels. They have good plots, a fair amount of humor, and 
there is more dialogue than narrative." The last two novels are 
published by Macmillan Co., $2. 



"Rose Macaulay is known to America only by her later work, 
in which she reveals herself as a satirist. She has, however, written 
nine earlier ones, which are unpublished here. . . . POTTERISM 
added a new word to the English language Potterism is a men- 
tal disease. It is a spiritual humbug and cant. . . DANGEROUS 
AGES is a story of three generations in a family, each having its 
cwn particular problem. The conclusion is that there is no dan- 
gerous age, all ages are alike dangerous." Her latest story is THE 
MYSTERY AT GENEVA which Bessie Graham tells us is "at best 
a trivial performance." Published by Boni, Liveright & Co., $1.90. 



"Ethel Sidgwick's writings recall the method of Henry James. 
She unravels the thoughts of her characters in complex and labor- 
ious detail. She is never outspoken: she hints. Her meaning has 
always fine shades and her thought has many twists. Her talk sounds 
very much written. It belongs to books." Her last novel, RESTO- 
RATION, came out this spring. 



The success of the new Harold Bell Wright novel, THE MINE 
WITH THE IRON DOOR, is dramatically evidenced in the pub- 
lisher's report that re-orders from dealers are twice as large and in 
many cases three times as large as the original, and that the stream 
cf these re-orders from every State in the Union, is developing into 
a torrent, in the book's second week repeat orders jumping from an 
average of 1085 to an average of 2765 copies a day. In view of 
the fact that a Harold Bell Wright novel has an initial advanced 
sale many times greater than many of the usual "best-sellers," one 
may realize the extraordinary power of the Wright name. The 
great and instantaneous success of THE MINE WITH THE IRON 
DOOR with the general public may be judged from the vast sale 
it is enjoying, and it is interesting to note that in literary circles 
the reaction to the book is also friendly. For example, the review 
of THE MINE WITH THE IRON DOOR in The Boston Transcript 
says: "The truth is that the critic falls upon a new volume by Mr. 
Wright as a gold digger upon a bonanza with the idea that it will 
give him a chance to spread himself a bit. But this time the au- 
thor has given us an extremely good story. There is in this book 
a sense of manuscript written in the saddle or under the stars with 
a lantern, so clearly do the notes of birds, the rush and chatter 
of running water, the breathless motion of Mother Earth herself, 
sound throughout. The last of the story is really exciting, most of 
it has some delightful and unusual character work, and all of it 
is full of Western air." D. Appleton & Co., $2. 



The New Society Blue Book 



Wish to announce that they are now 
making ready for press. This book 
will contain the names and addresses, 
phones, etc.. of. the most prominent 
families in San Francisco, Alameda 
County, Marin County, San Mateo 
County, etc. Also men and women's 
clubs of high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses, Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

1659 Mason St root. San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Franklin 6912. 

Subscription Price $0.00 Per Year. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 

444 Market St. 6'1? Santa Fe An. 

San Francisco, Cnlif. Lo8 Angeles, Calif. 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 



PAUL ELDER'S 



239 Post Street 



at 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 



San Fr 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 




TownpGlcrier 



Q UNO THEDEWLAm THOU 
rX'OHETHATMLL PLAY THE 
pjvwg? PEVH-.SIR MTH VOW 

WW — Shakspeare- 



— There is no doubt that the plight of the Russian refugees who 
have been confined at Angel Island is very bad and that some of 
them at least are such as might be of great value to the commun- 
ity. Take a man like Orloff, who was for many years a railroad 
official of high rank at Harbin, and who is a man of undoubted 
courage and ability. The chances are that his family will never 
be reunited. The destruction of a class such as occurred in Rus- 
sia, is accompanied by a terrible amount of suffering. I saw two 
young women in front of the Mills Building the other day, Russians, 
with common blue denim skirts, whose every movement spoke of 
the most distinguished training and whose voices were the very per- 
fection of human culture. If you drop into the Russian church, 
you will see more of the same thing. 

— In spite of all the allowances that have to be made for pub- 
licity and that exaggeration which has become as it were a neces- 
sity of modern life, there is no doubt that manufactories are in- 
creasing in, the East Bay district to an extent that would not have 
been thought possible except by the real experts, who, in com- 
parison with those claiming to be experts, are very few in number. 
Large silk mills are coming into Oakland and that is only one and 
by no means a relatively very significant sign of development. And 
that there is capital to spare, is shown by the beautiful new theater 
that is going up and other first class improvements. Oakland is 
fast developing in everything except manners and ability. As for 
the former it might just as well be Hayward. 

— Those outside the state who read of the preparations for the 
pony express affair, and see the carryings on of middle aged men, 
will have much to say about our irrepressible kiddishness. And if 
that belated childhood was only confined to such matters as these 
there would not be much else to do than smile at it. But unfor- 
tunately it sometimes laps over into more important things and then 
tragedy is the offshoot. Such is the Ku Klux Klan and such the 
tendency to private flogging parties such as we are having in the 
South. Our childishness is harmless. Long may it wave. 

* * * 

— Somebody left a two days old baby in church. Who left it? It 
might have been the mother; but it does not seem likely, unless the 
mother is of stronger stuff that we make out of our people for we 
can hardly imagine an American woman who would be able to get 
up and carry her baby to church and leave it there on the second 
day. It must therefore in all probability have been a foreigner and 
a Catholic foreigner who thereby unconsciously paid her church the 
highest compliment. Something must be said for an institution which 
has so impressed itself on the poor and ignorant. 

* * * 

—A madman called Padilla has been setting fire to houses and 
warehouses in the south and has probably caused a number of 
deaths. All the time the sensationalists have been crying out that 
revolutionary reds have been doing the mischief. It is about time 
that all that nonsense about such things stopped. There are no such 
animals in our midst. Society, however, is still more or less at the 
mercy of the mad. An East Indian running amok can cause no end 
of trouble and in the same way a sudden impulse to insanity puts 
even the most civilized at the mercy of the insane. There should 
be some way of keeping track of people of that sort. 



— With the extension of the city down into the peninsula prac- 
tically on the way the matter of transportation will have to re- 
ceive more attention. For many reasons it does not seem alto- 
gether advisable to spend a great deal on the development of elec- 
tric lines as they seem to be reaching the limit of their economic 
use. In many places in the East they are losing out to and being 
substituted by motor lines. Moreover, who can say how rapidly 
the air lines will be feasible? When Great Britain builds airships 
as large as ocean liners and the three horse power engine has 
proven successful for small planes and is being increasingly used 
in Europe, who can say that the present system of transit is per- 
fect? The defensive propaganda in the street cars shows that the 
trend is making itself felt on the subconscious mind of the street 
car people. Maybe the trolley is doomed. 

— School-children are to be supervised at their dances by anxious 
mothers who are worried at the tendency of the young damsels to 
hip-flasks and to cigarettes to say nothing of long periods of sitting 
out in sedans with the blinds drawn. Our professional new expert 
on children, Superintendent of Education, Gwinn, is inclined to 
the belief that the revolutionary conduct of the youngsters is due 
to their going into industry. But high school girls are not in in- 
dustry. We might suggest that the fault is to a large extent due to 
the defection of the socially elite, who form the fashions in be- 
havior, and whose pictures in the papers, doing just the things that 
the high school girls are blamed for, are both a suggestion and an 
example. 

— Now if there is one thing that ought to be done at the State 
University it is to make hazing taboo for good and all. The prac- 
tice continually develops greater and greater vulgarity. This making 
young men go down on their knees and offer their hands to strange 
girls of their own age, is beastly in the extreme. It is insulting to 
the girls and degrading to the men and makes sport of what should 
be a very serious and, indeed, solemn thing. The girls don't like it, 
naturally; the men hate it and the authorities wink at it. But 
let a boy or girl come out with a really strong and vigorous crit- 
icism of things as they are and the place thereof knows them no 
more. The university is fast becoming an elementary institution 
where fat sycophants beg for endowments. 

--A visit to Sacramento convinces you that the capital is an 
almost inconceivably undeveloped village. Drop into a restaurant 
and you hear the most banal local gossip, consult an official and 
vcu are perfectly astonished at the bucolic way in which he re- 
gards the affairs of the universe. A week or two ago and the whole 
place was convulsed over a question affecting the garters of the 
nurses at the City Hospital; today they shake their heads solemnly 
over a question of Catholic influence. The world moves slowly 
in Sacramento. But the streets are gay with the light attire of 
women and the Palm beach suits of the men. It was always a 
queer place with a substratum of devilishness. 
¥ * * 

— Was there ever in the history of the state the trouble there 
now is about salaries in the various departments? A week or two 
ago and the school department was the center of the stage and 
a veriable arena; today, it is the Motor Vehicle department where 
the row is and where a Johnsonian president of the Civil Service 
Commission wages war on the Richardsonian president of the State 
Division of Motor Vehicles and all in the name of economy. It 
is topsy turveydom with a vengeance and the politicians are stand- 
ing around to see if the governor will whang his own appointee in 
the name of economy. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 




BUSY CUPID 

CALDWELL-OLNEY — Announcements have been received of the 
wedding of Miss Constance Caldwell, daughter ot Mr. and 
Mrs. 'W . W. Caldwell ot Pasadena, and John PHcLean Olney. 
son ot Mr. and Mrs. Warren Olney Jr. of Oakland. The 
Olney family is among the most prominent of Alameda Coun- 
ty and has been for years associated with the social, financial 
and political life of the bay district. 

HINZ-O'DONNELL — The marriage of Miss Ramona Hinz and 
Mr. Lowrie O'Donnell was quietly celebrated in the Hotel 
Fairmont Monday afternoon in the presence of the two fami- 
lies and a few of their most intimate friends. The ceremony 
was performed by Dean J. Wilmer Gresham. Mr. Leroy Lin- 
nard gave the bride in marriage. Her only attendant was 
her sister, Mrs. Wallace Rutherford Dowd, wife of Lieuten- 
ant Dowd. U. S. N. Mr. Hunley Bobb of New Orleans was the 
best man. On their return from their honeymoon, the des- 
tination of which they are keeping secret, Mr. and Mrs. 
O'Donnell will live in San Francisco, where an attractive 
home awaits them on Jackson street. 

MAXWELL-BRYAN — Miss Katherine Maxwell of Oakland, whose 
marriage to Mr. Carlton Bryan will take place on September 
is. has chosen five friends to be her bridal attendants. Mr. 
Bryan's sister, Mrs. Edward Burke Carbet, will be the ma- 
tron of honor and the others are Mrs. Welby Dinsmore, Miss 
Elizabeth Bliss. Mrs. Harry Magee and Mrs. Jack Okell. 
Mr. Arthur Erb will be the best man and several of the 
ushers will come from the South for the event. The wed- 
ding will take place at the Presbyterian Church in Oakland 
and many friends from this side of the bay will be there. 

LUNCHEON'S 

LEWENHAUPT — Countess Eric Lewenhaupt, who returned Fri- 
day from a fortnight's stay at Lake Tahoe, where she was 
the guest of friends, entertained over the week-end Mr. and 
Mrs. George P. Beardsley of San Rafael and one or two 
other guests. Oo Sunday the countess entertained at an in- 
formal luncheon at which the house party was supplemented 
by Miss Elizabeth Zane, Miss Aimee Raisch, Mr. Harry Hast- 
ings and Mr. Dudley Gunn and several others. 

SHARON — The third of a series of informal luncheons was given 
Sunday by Mrs. Frederick Sharon at her home in Menlo. 
Mrs. Sharon is living in her apartments at the Palace, but 
motors down to her country home almost every week end 
for an al fresco luncheon. Her guests Sunday were Mr. and 
Mrs. Jerome Politzer, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear and 
Dr. Harry Tevis. Mrs. Thomas Hesketh, Mrs. Sharon's daugh- 
ter, and her husband are expected to arrive in New York 
next month to visit Mrs. Sharon at her apartment in that 
city. It will be their first visit in the United States since 
their marriage about two years ago, and Mrs. Sharon will 
go East to meet them. 

SESSIONS — Miss Janette Sessions entertained some of her friends 
at a luncheon party at her home on Saturday, having more 
than a dozen guests. 

BERENDSEN— Mrs. Edward McLaughlin (Edith Young) is here 
from her home in Los Angeles, having come north to greet 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Young, who returned re- 
cently from Europe. As a welcome to Mrs. McLaughlin, who 
was a belle in society here a few years ago. Miss Anita Be- 
rendsen gave a recent luncheon party. 

HUME — Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Hume will entertain at a gar- 
den party at their home in Piedmont on Sunday afternoon, 
August 26, in honor of Mr. and Mrs. William Ede and Mr. 
and Mrs. Walton Moore. The latter have also recently re- 
turned from abroad. 

WARREN — Mrs. Harry C. Warren gave a mah jongg party fol- 
lowing luncheon at the Woman's Athletic Club Tuesday, 
this in honor of Mrs. James Pike of Nevada. 

TEAS 

SELFRIDGE — Mrs. John S. Selfridge was hostess at a tea at her 
home in San Rafael Tuesday in honor of her mother, Mrs. 
Theodore B. Beatty. Mrs. E. A. Selfridge and Mrs. Frederick 
Kellond assisted the hostess. 



McGOWAN — Mile. Lise-Rolande Jennar Berlaimont, a visiting 
French artist of wide renown, was the guest of honor for 
whom Mrs. George McGowan entertained several score of 
friends at tea Tuesday. Mile. Berlaimont, who is a famous 
portrait artist in Paris, passed last winter in Washington, 
D. C, where she was one of the much lionized celebrities of 
the cosmopolitan society of the capital. 

DINNERS 

PENTZ — In honor of her nieces, Miss Deborah and Miss Edith 
Pentz, Miss Anne Pentz entertained at a dinner on Saturday 
afternoon at her home in San Rafael. Twenty-four young 
people, including a number of guests from town, enjoyed the 
occasion and following the dinner the hostess and her guests 
repaired to the Hotel Rafael for the weekly hotel dance. 

EBRIGHT — Dr. and Mrs. George Ebright entertained at an at- 
tractive dinner on Saturday evening at their home at Menlo 
Park. 

ARMSBY — Several visitors to California who came here to at- 
tend the Bohemian Club play were the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. George Armsby of New York and Burlingame Monday 
evening at dinner at their home down the peninsula. The 
guests of honor were Henry Hadley of Boston, who composed 
the music for the play: Joseph D. Redding, who wrote the 
book, and Henri Scott, basso of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany of New York, who took a leading role in the Bohemian 
Club concert Friday. 

McNear — Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. McNear entertained at a 
dinner last Thursday evening at their country home at Menlo 
Park when they had as their guests: Mr. and Mrs. Nion 
Tucker, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery, Mr. and Mrs. Warren 
Speiker, Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. McCormick and Mr. and 
Mrs. Andrew Welch. 

MARYE — Mr. and Mrs. George T. Marye entertained a dozen of 
their friends at a dinner party Sunday night in honor of 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. McNear. 

MEYER — Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Meyer have sent out invitations 
for a dinner, reception and dance at the Hotel Richelieu on 
the evening of August 2S, the occasion being the eightieth 
birthday of the host. 

DAVIS — Mr. and Mrs. George Davis were recent dinner hosts 
at the Hotel Richelieu, and entertained a small party of 
intimate friends. It was an informal affair that was brought 
to a pleasant close with a bridge game. 

JONES — Mr. and Mrs. Paul Jones gave a buffet supper Monday 
night at their home in San Rafael. The guests were Miss 
Virginia Innes. Miss Jean Howard, Miss Deborah Pentz, Miss 
Edith Pentz, Miss Betsy Dibblee and others. 

HEINZMAN — Dr. and Mrs. William H. Heinzman entertained at 
a dinner in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Edward Foster on 
Sunday evening. Dr. and Mrs. Heinzman have recently re- 
turned from a six weeks' fishing trip in the high Sierras. 
Their time was divided between Feather River Inn and a 
rustic camp high up in the lake region. 

LOWERY — Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Lowery and Charles N. Black 
entertained some of their friends at a dinner party Tuesday 
night at their home on Pacific avenue, having a dozen or so 
guests in all. 

DANCES 

WELCH — The first of this season's coming-out ball will be on 
October 20, when Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welcn wili give a 
ball at their home in San Mateo to introduce their two lovely 
daughters, the Misses Marie and Florence Welch. 

PALMER — Mrs. Silas Palmer will give a ball early in the fall 
for her niece. Miss Idabelle Wheaton, who is now on route 
home from Europe. It will probably take place at the Charles 
Holbrook residence, on Washington street and Van Ness ave- 
nue. 

DEERING — Miss Francesca Deering, the attractive daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Deering, will formally be introduced 

at a ball in November. 
MADISON — A ball will be given by Frank Madison on October 

26 in honor of Miss Caroline Madison. This will be in the 

city at one of the fashionable hotels. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



IX TOWN AMI OUT 

POPE — Mr. and Mrs. George Pope, their daughter, Mrs. Mose- 
ley Taylor; their sons, Mr. George Pope Jr. and Mr. Kenneth 
Pope, returned to their country place at Lake Tahoe on Sat- 
urday after a week's stay at their Burlingame home. They 
came down from the lake on account of the death of Mr. 
Pope's sister, Mrs. Daniel T. Murphy. The Popes were ac- 
companied to Tahoe by Mrs. Eugene Murphy, who will he 
their house guest for ten days or two weeks. On Wednes- 
day Mrs. Charles Templeton Crocker went to the lake to visit 
the Popes. 
DILLMAN — Mr. and Mrs. Dean Dillman and their infant son. 
Dean Dillman Jr., Miss Mary Bernice Moore, Miss Dorothy 
Crawford and Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Moore motored to 
the Moore place, "Rancho Tres O.ios de Aqua," near Santa 
Cruz, last Saturday. The Moores will remain away from town 
until the first of October, and Mrs. Dillman, who was Miss 
Josephine Moore, will be with them. 
HOBART — Mrs. Walter Hobart and Miss Ysabel Chase have gone 
to Colorado Springs, where they will be the guests of Ho- 
bart's sister, Mrs. Charles Baldwin. Mrs. Baldwin came west 
for the wedding of her niece, Miss Ruth Hobart, and Wil- 
liam W. Crocker. 
HANCHETT — Miss Lucy Hanchett came up from Santa Barbara 
last week and has been spending a few days at the Hanchett 
home in Washington street. Miss Hanchett came north to 
participate in some of the golf tournaments. She will return 
South this week. Miss Alice Hanchett did not accompany her 
sister. The Hanchetts expect to make their future home in 
Santa Barbara. 
BUGBEE — Mrs. Milton Bugbee is entertaining her aunt, Mrs. 
Horace Geiger of Germantown, Pa., at her home in Burlin- 
game. Mrs. Geiger expects to be in California until Septem- 
ber. Mrs. Bugbee, who, with Mr. Bugbee, is occupying the 
Chesebrough house for the summer months, has been en- 
tertaining in honor of Mrs. Geiger at several informal af- 
fairs. A few days ago she gave a luncheon for Mrs. Geiger 
and had as guests Mrs. Russell Selfridge, Mrs. Wilson of 
Baltimore, Mrs. Charles Lyman and Mrs. John MacDonald. 
JORDAN — Mrs. Lawrence Jordan, who was Miss Elvira Coburn, is 
here from San Salvador on her first visit since her marriage, 
more than a year ago. She is being welcomed at several 
parties. 

INTIMATIONS 
PILLSBURY — Mr. and Mrs. Horace D. Pillsbury have purchased 
a handsome ranch property near Santa Barbara as a gift to 
their son, Evan S. Pillsbury Jr. The latter has been study- 
ing law in his father's office, where his grandfather, the noted 
lawyer, Evan S. Pillsbury. is head of the firm. Young Pillsbury 
has always loved the outdoor life, and his decision to go in 
for farming on a large scale is pleasing to his parents. 
RE.THERS — Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Rethers have not as yet 
gone to Australia, their sailing plans awaiting further details. 
Meantime Mrs. Rethers is being farewelled at a round of 
affairs. 
DEVEREUX — Mr. William G. Devereux is receiving the sym- 
pathy of his friends ,for the death of his brother, Mr. Walter 
B. Devereux Jr., which occurred at his summer home in Calais. 
Maine. The late Mr. Devereux was in California a few years 
ago and visited his brother and sister-in-law at Burlingame. 
DEL MONTE — The week-end at Del Monte was gay with parties 
and entertainments in connection with visitors' day at Del 
Monte civilians' military training camp. Saturday, August 18. 
Friends and relatives of the boys who have been encamped 
for three weeks at Del Monte polo field arrived in hnge num- 
bers from all over the State, and particularly the entire new 
Palm Grill at Del Monte was reserved for Saturday evening. 



ilarmmt Sntlet 
Ultimata 

can be purchased at all de- 
partment stores. A trial 
will prove their worth. 
Booklet "Retain Your 
Beauty" will be furnished 
on request. 

flkrnuut Hiiilrt 
KrqutBtttfl 

2123 Fillmore Street 





By A FLICKER. 



IT seems to be the fashion for most good picture making com- 
panies to go to sea these days, so the Gerson Picture Produc- 
tion Corporation have followed the style. Their company 
engaged in the filming of "Waterfront Wolves" started actual 
shooting of the picture Monday, August 13, on the three masted 
brigantine Roy W. Sommers. 

The sequences the first day were made tied up to Pier 29. 
but after that they went to sea in real earnest and most of the 
week was spent on the waters of the Bay. In fact for some 
of the members of the cast it was spent in the Bay, for in the 
course of the action several of them had to jump overboard, 
and on Wednesday they had a thrill that wasn't in the script, 
when owing to the roll and the wind, the cameraman, George 
Crocker, almost fell overboard and was barely rescued from an 
icy bath, camera and all. The story is one of thrills, love, laugh- 
ter, and action, and the scenes are laid on our own waterfront 
and in Chinatown. The cast includes such well known names of 
the screen as Ora Carew, Jay Morley, Hal Stevens, "Tiny" Sand- 
ford, Dick LaReno, Emanuel Galvez, Emma Muncy and others. 

The Graf Productions are hard at work, in fact night and day 
on their big sea picture, "Half-A-Dollar Bill." Cameras began to 
crank on Monday the thirteenth, at the Pacific Studios at San 
Mateo. The cast includes such well-loved names on the screen 
as Anna Q. Nilsson, Alec Francis, William Carleton, Mitchell 
Lewis, Raymond Hatton, George McQuarrie, and little Frankie 
Benton, a most engaging baby of some three months of age. 
There will be about two weeks of studio work, and then the 
whole company will set sail on the rolling main in a coasting 
schooner for two weeks at sea. Let's hope for the sake of the 
picture that they are all good sailors, for think of having to 
act when you are in the clutches of mal de mer! 

Telegram received Saturday from Lew Cody, who is on loca- 
tion in Yellowstone National Park with the Rupert Hughes 
company filming the production "Law Against Law": "Only 
been asked eighteen times if I was any relation to Buffalo Bill. 
Had flirtation with female geyser. Got burned. As result they 
have named nearby town Cody, but I expect those little atten- 
tions. Geysers here go up in the air higher than a temperamental 
actress. Have only been able to get a kick in the shins so far." 
Telegram received three days later from Lew Cody, still in Yel- 
lowstone National Park: "Have improved a little. Nearly broke 
ankle. Nearly broke arm. Nearly fell in geyser. Nearly ready 
to leave for home." 

Wallace MacDonald, appearing in Tod Browning's production 
of "The Day of Faith" at the Goldwyn studios, has been a hero 
for eighteen feminine stars. He declares that only one took him 
seriously, and that was Doris May. who is now his wife. 
* * * 

What are the ornaments that adorn the chests of the Russian 
soldiers — long bullets or cigars? Neither, they are prayer pock- 
ets as Marshall Neilan discovered while filming his Russian 
drama. "The Rendezvous." Each metal capsule contains a prayer 
to be read before going into battle. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street SAX FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

El, MER If. WOODBURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

M.ike Vnnr Reservations nt City Booking Office 

4111 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutler 611* Under Management CARL S STANIJST 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 




By P. N. CERINGER 



Ct:ap Mcney Crisis, IX. 

GERMANY is giving the world an ex- 
ample of what would eventually hap- 
pen in any country where cheap money is 
issued in a continuous stream from the gov- 
ernment and private presses. It was hoped 
when the Cuno government stepped down 
that Stresemann would almost immediately 
take certain means of averting the eventual 
debacle. Stresemann, however, has simply 
continued along the same lines as his pre- 
decessor and Germany is now to see a long 
term of struggling between the aristocratic- 
military-manufacturing element on the one 
hand and the communist-socialist element on 
the other. Rioting will soon be a normal 
ccndition among the people and this may 
become actual revolution against all gov- 
ernment. Eventually the mark will be utterly 
repudiated. 



The British Gesture 

The English Premier has made his gesture 
and Germany has expected and still expects 
quite as much from it as has England. But 
the French and Belgians will go right on in 
the occupation of the Ruhr. There are many, 
in this country, who believe that the Ruhr 
occupation and the bluster of Lord Curzon 
will bring on a war between France and 
England. Such a war is an unlikely result. 
England, supposing France elimated as a fac- 
tor, would almost immediately occupy the 
position of holding the German fretful porcu- 
pine in her capacious lap but that would not 
be a comfortable job. That would be a job 
capable of taxing for successful solution a 
much more brainy man than Curzon or Stan- 
ley Baldwin. And England is not willing to 
handle that German war baby alone. She 
wants the help of this country. She will not 
get cur help. The German muddle should 
be, and eventually will have to be, straight- 
ened out by Germans and not by English- 
men. 



Where People Go Estray 

Where people go estray on the question 
of the issuance of a national paper currency 
is that they easily make themselves believe 
governments can create values. No govern- 
ment has ever been able to do this. No gov- 
ernment ever will be able to so do. Take 
the instance of the German mark. There is 
nothing at all behind this mark to give it 
value except the fiat of government and that 
government is so wobbly on its legs at all 
tmes that it can no more guarantee its own 



length of life than it can that of the value- 
less money it issues. There must be behind 
the issue, of the greenback or the mark, a 
value which stands for the eventual redemp- 
tion of the paper symbol. This value must be 
of some commodity of as nearly non-fluc- 
tuating character as possible. Gold is just 
such a commodity and nothing else, so far 
developed in the world's history, is as non- 
fluctuating in value as is gold. Remember, 
that governments cannot create values. 



A Pretty Sold Country 

These good United States of ours are pret- 
ty solid in a financial sense. We have half of 
Eurcpe in a turmoil. We have England sitting 
on her tight little island and shedding co- 
piuous tears over the terrible error of France 
in not letting her dominate everything in Eu- 
rope and we have a war in China. We have 
had the death of our late President and we 
have several very ugly protests as regards 
labor and capital clashes to come in this 
country and we have a new President and 
yet we go right merrily on and business is 
getting better and better. We are sitting 
very pretty, thank you, kindly. 



A Urr.que Advantage 

The United States have thoroughly dem- 
onstrated to the world at large that they are 
large enough and strong enough in the prod- 
ucts of the earth and of factories to stand 
alone. Prosperity, or what is very nearly 
akin to prosperity, has come to us, despite 
the fact that the world is at loggerheads with 
itself, outside of our own blessed borders. 



England and Other Tight Countries 

England being an island, and dependent 
on its exports and its manufacturing, and 
having to procure its food stuffs and a great 
many of its raw materials for manufactur- 
ing from countries far away from the tight 
little island, finds it impossible to recover 
its prestige as a manufacturing and export 
center. There has always been a very large 
volume of trade between England and Ger- 
many which today does not exist at all, 
and the occupation of the Ruhr has not 
helped matters very much in this respect, 
although it may not be truthfully said that 
it is owing to the France-Belgian occupation 
that the bad trade exchange conditions ob- 
tain between England and Germany. These 
bad conditions are due to many causes, not 
the least of which is the continued issuance 
of worthless paper money by Germany. 



Now Bavaria Takes a Hand 

Bavaria is now asking to take a hand at 
the unlimited printing of cheap money. This 
is on a par with what has happened, when 
the cheap money craze has hit other coun- 
tries. The Reichsbank managers have re- 
fused to grant Bavaria this right to print 
unlimited trillions of marks and now Bavaria 
says she will go right ahead and print her 
money regardless of any embargo the Ger- 
man so-called republic may see fit to saddle 
on the monarchist state. 



Po'ncare and the French 

Poincare has taken the English Premier's 
last note and politely has riddled it to pieces. 
Poincare has the entire French nation be- 
hind him and he stands pat. There is no 
change in the France-Belgian position. 

The Ccote Failure 

There is nothing much that is new in the 
matter of the Coote failure. It looks now 
as if energetic action would be taken look- 
ing to inflicting just as severe a punishment 
on Coote and his associates as it is possible 
to find in California laws. This is as it should 
be and Coote should be left in no uncer- 
tainty very long as to what term he may 
have to serve and why he is to serve it. 
Every other dishonest broker should be 
brought to book, before any chance of a 
failure occurs. There are hundreds of brok- 
ers in this state, and notably in this city 
there are many who should have been stopped 
in their fleecing of the public long ago. 



Insurance Matters 

There is nothing like a proper recreation 
to stir the blood and to stimulate one to an 
attempt at securing a larger share of busi- 
ness than formerly. George H. Tyson is one 
of those who believes in the recreative power 
of the Great Outdoors. The Great American 
Insurance Company of New York and the 
Phoenix of Hartford will now get the bene- 
fit of his visit to the Feather River Inn, 
where he spent some time with his family 
trying out the golf links and the fishing in 
the numerous lakes with which this part of 
the high Sierras abounds. 



Banks and Bankers 

These days it is very difficult to get the 
banker to take his mind off of a projected 
vacation of "reminiscensing" about one that 
is past. It is in the blood, this urge for the 
country and a little rest, or the desire to tell 
you of the good things just enjoyed. Busi- 
ness at the banks is good, better than it has 
been for many months past. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



QmyTkiir Conquered 

'By this Clean Colorless liquid, 

A Scientific Discovery That Has Restored 
Youthful Appearance to Thousands 



u 



A True Substitute for the Lost Color 
Results in a Week 

"Isn't it astonishing?" 

"What will happen next?" 

"Is gray hair to become a thing of the past?" 

Such questions as these have been asked over and over 
again ever since it was announced that a scientist had 
discovered a liquid which, although colorless itself, would 
restore the original color to gray hair. 

It actually seemed unbelievable at first, but the expe- 
rience of people everywhere has proved that the seem- 
ingly impossible has been accomplished. 

This now famous preparation, which is known as 
Kolor-Bak, has actually given us the means to baffle the 
effects of Time. Many a woman whose graying hair 
was beginning to make her look ' 'too old" for the gaieties 
of the younger set, and many a man whose grayness 
threatened to keep him from promotion or from employ- 
ment suited to his ability, have taken years from their 
appearance with this clean, colorless liquid. 

There is really no excuse for anyone to be gray when 
there is such an easy way to keep the hair from showing 
even the slightest change in color. 

The secret of Color-Bak is told below. If you are 
growing gray, here is news that will interest you. 



How Long Will You Endure Grayness 
When You Can Banish It So Easily? 




If you have been allowing pray hair to get the 
best of you — if you have accepted grayness as 
something inevitable, something you can't help — 
it's time to look about you and see what Science has 
done for people like you. 

If you could only know how many of the people 
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hair turn gray and who then have seen 
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of Kolor-Bak, you would soon find that 
there is no reason for concern about your 
grayness, and you would take this easy 
way to conquer it. 

Scientists tell us that hair becomes 
gray because through age, illness, shock 
or disease the tiny cells in the scalp, 
called follicles, whose business it is to 
supply the pigment or coloring matter 
to the hair, have become inactive. They 
no longer produce this pigment, and 
naturally the hair must suffer — it must 
turn gray. 

Preparations of every sort have been 
and are sold for the purpose of restoring 
the lost color. Some are merely colored 
dyes or stains. Others have been repre- 
sented as having the power to replace 
the pigment by revitalizing the follxles 
— but the claims put forth for these 
preparations have no foundation in 
scientific fact They are known to be <•' 
false by scientific men. who have investi- 
gated ail the methods generally in use. They are 
known to be false by those who have used these 
compounds with unsatisfactory results. 

The discovery of Kolor-Bak came as a revelation 
to the multitude who had turned to ordinary prepa- 
rations in the ho] 
restoring the lost color 
and w ho so many times 
had found that promises 
were not fulfilled by 
performance. 

They realized that at 



A 



last a real substitute for the vanished pigmentation 
had been discovered. No matter what the cause of 
the grayness, it is simply amazing to see the results 
when Kolor-Bak is used. 

It doesn't make any difference what the former 
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actly as it was in the past. 

Kolor-Bak also gives beauty to the 
hair in renewed gloss, silky texture and 
luxuriant appearance. The hair does not 
look streaked or dyed — color is uniform 
throughout, Kesults appear in a week. 



/ 



My Hair Was 
Quite Gray 



ago my ha 
quite gray 
coming gri 

was f alii n 



.ml be 



It 



illiiigout. My 

itched and 

dandruff appeared. 

"Only a fen appli- 
cation B of Kolor- ; 
Bak stopped the j 
itching and dan- j 
druff. My hair soon 
stopped cotningout. I 
Most wonderful of 
all. boil . ver.is that 
mv hiiiris again its 
original color. I look I 
ten years younger." < 

{A Typical Letter) \ 




Banishes Dandruff 

Relieves Itching Scalp 

Stops Falling Hair 

Not only does Kolor-Bak restore the 
original color to the hair, it has a tonic 
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It banishes dandruff and keeps the pores 
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and gives a delightful sense of cleanli- 
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Amazing Results 
Reported 

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and shade of hair. 

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"Am 60 years old. 
Hair was white. Now 
brown as in youth," 



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Send for Trial Offer 

To give you the fairest opportunity to learn by 
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our money-back guarantee at your dealer's. 

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tready tried Kolor-Bak you have not found 
the truly effective way to restore the vanished 
color. 

Of course you will want to compare this re- 
markable method with other preparations. We 
want you bo Baa the difference between Kol 

and anything else you have tried, and we want 
you to make the compai ion ;it our risk. A!I that 
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regardless of former color. Mail the coupon to 

Hygienic Laboratories, "J South Peoria Street, 

l Chicago. III. 

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204 Sout!i Peoria Street 
Dept. 8324 Chicago, 111. 

Please Bead your Trial Offer on Kolor-Bak 
and your Fr< e eatment of the Hair 

and S 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 



Pleasure's Ww 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore. 



Granada 

" ITie Spoilers" is unnecessarily horrible. 
That awful fight (to remember which is to 
sicken and shudder) the torrential rain 
storm, the terrifying explosions, the mud of 
exaggerated sliminess for innocent bystand- 
ers to fall into, even the agonizing efforts 
of the heroine's brother to save her honor, 
all, all, are rather appalling. "Spoilers" in- 
deed! The theme of the play is a sordid 
one and the tremendous effort to color the 
adventures of the gold-seekers with the hue 
of romance was not successful. Ignoble mo- 
tives breed shameful conduct. There is not 
a thing uplifting about the picture, not even 
a crude movie "uplift" tendency. It is all 
low and depressing and deadly. Milton Sills 
is a fine figure of a fellow always, but his 
part is too brutal to make any appeal, while 
that nice blonde Anna Nilsson is cast all 
wrong as an Alaska music hall favorite, and 
Robert Edeson — oh, cruelest cut of all — gen- 
tle, amiable, refined Robert Edeson, is made 
to play a very degraded character indeed. 
Noah Beery we are in the habit of connect- 
ing with crime and deeds of deep villainy, 
but little Louise Fazenda should never be 
running off to the gold fields in strange men's 
cabins, frequenting Alaska dance dives, and 
watching a fight that was unspeakable in its 
brutality. Paul Ash and his orchestral tid- 
bits seemed quiet and elegant after "The 
Spoilers" and the Felix cartoon was a sweet 
pastel. 



California 

Theodore Kosloff's ballet is the great at- 
traction on the California current bill. His 
arrangement of the "Valse Triste" is a beau- 
tiful thing and the dancers are selected well 
for both grace and comeliness. Kosloff is 
master of his art, and this performance is 
admirable, with musical accompaniment also 
satisfactory. Reginald Denny follows in an- 
other prize-fighting picture and the Interna- 
tional News films is unusually interesting. 
Of the feature, a picture called "Legally 
Dead," there is not much going to be said 
on this page. What IS the good? The pro- 



\itielands 



ducers of motion pictures mean to con- 
tinue making impossible films; the good 
crops up incidentally, the bad it would seem 
is systematic. And the feeble protest of the 
few is of course utterly futile. The Califor- 
nia orchestra plays some delightful selec- 
tions. 



Ethel Barrymore Packs Orpheum 

The inimitable acting of radiant Ethel 
Barrymore is attracting the usual audiences 
to the Orpheum, and then many others who 
are unusual there. The Barrie play, "The 
Twelve Pound Look," occupies twenty-five 
delightful minutes, and it's real talk — not 
stage talk, never irrelevant, always illumi- 
nating. Barrie is a perfect master of his craft, 
and never was an author better served than is 
Sir James by the beautiful Barrymore. Close 
conception of the part of Lady Sims by Vir- 
ginia Chauvenet draws one's attention and 
engages one's sympathy. Sir Harry is well 
clone by Philip Lord. 

Duci de Kerekjarto, the violinist who has 
created a large musical following during his 
s'ay in San Francisco, has an interesting 
change of program this week in which he is 
accompanied by Maurice Eisner. A playlet 
called "Women Who Pass in the Night" is 
presented successfully by Laura Pierpont. It 
has its points which are well made by Miss 
Pierpcnt and her able company. Harry Hines 
is an acceptable comedian with some new 
jokes and the Harpers, Peral and Joe, have 
an amusing little comedy act. 



Columbia 

We don't get half enough plays like "The 
First Year." Good, wholesome comedy, made 
from life as we know it to be in its many 
funny phases, shaped by the skilful hand 
cf the practiced playwright, and acted by 
earnest, conscientious players whose "team 
work" is incomparable — and you have an 
evening's entertainment of a sort not plen- 
tiful in these days. 

Frank Craven wrote the piece and plays 
its principal character, one Tommy Tucker, 
whose quaint personality we grow to love. It 
is a story of plain people, and the comicali- 
t es as well as the disasters of early mar- 
ried life. 

Alice Owens has a congenial role as the 
young wife. In the notable company is the 
veteran actress Maude Granger whose long 
experience on the American stage estab- 
lishes her right to the deference shown her 
in this production. John Brown, Tim Mur- 
phy, Mary Marble and Frank Leighton are 
all well cast. 



Warfieid Theater 

Five leading attractions are scheduled for 
the program on stage and screen at the War- 
field Theater during the week commencing 
August 25. "Rouged Lips," a story of the 
stage adapted from "Upstage," a magazine 
story by Rita Weiman, will be enacted by 
a cast in which Viola Dana and Tom Moore 
are the featured players. The picture is said 
to give many intimate revelations of that 
life back stage which makes its people so 
fascinating to those who occupy orchestra 
seats out in front. Herb Wiedoeft's Cinder- 
ella Roof Orchestra, "The Sousa's Band of 
Jazzdom," will have a return engagement 
for one week only, commencing with the 
opening of "Rouged Lips." "South Sea 
Dreams" will be presented on the stage, with 
scenic setting suggestive of the title, as a 
background for the dancing of Thelma Har- 
vey and a quartet of pretty girls. Miss Har- 
vey, late of the Ziegfeld Roof, where she was 
a famous exponent of the South Sea dances, 
will appear in the same dance which is now 
being presented by Gilda Gray at the Rivoli 
in New York. A volcano in action will add 
to the scenic novelty. Lipschultz, conduct- 
ing the Warfield Music Master in concert, 
"A Pleasant Journey," another "Our Gang" 
ccmedy, with the mischievous urchins in new 
pranks and selected news pictures will com- 
plete a generous program. 



Crcheum Theater 

Starting with the matinee on Sunday next 
the Orpheum announces one of the world s 
greatest stars, Nazimova, the incomparable 
Russian actress in a new vehicle from the 
well known pen of George Middleton enti- 
tled "Collusion." Another star of note will 
be on the same bill with Nazimova, namely 
Miss Juliet. No relation to Romeo and Jul- 
iet but nevertheless she deports herself as 
Juliet of well known fame would. She has 
a repertoire of more than one thousand im- 
personations, and her changes are so quick 
and skilful that they border on the impos- 
sible. America's favorite singing Juvenile 
is Irving Fisher who appears in "Songs De 
Luxe," assisted by Don Prosser at the pi- 
ano. Joe Rome and Lou Gaut are a team 
of eccentric dancers who vary their dance 




V OvpWnv. &\oux L m ■ 



The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 



MATINEE DAILY 



August 25, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



routine with a little song and a few stories. 
Eight Blue Demons are an aggregation of 
whirling Arabians who are more graceful 
and quick than anything without wings. Fern 
Redmond and H. Wells have taken a gypsy 
fortune teller and her many wiles for the 
theme of their comedy offering and they 
have entitled it "The Gyp," which is made 
up of character comedy and song. Jack Ca- 
hill and Don Romaine do a comedy skit, one 



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in blackface and the other as aa Italian, 
which they call "A Comedy Mix-up." Cap- 
tain Betts' Seals, animal actors extraordinary, 
will complete a most pleasing and new bill, 
as there is only one holdover act and that 
is Rome and Gaut, but they are so good that 
it will be a pleasure to see them again. 



St. Francis Hotel 

San Francisco is to be accorded the priv- 
ilege of giving its resident artists sustained 
recognition during the coming musical sea- 
son. A series of fortnightly concerts to this 
end is being arranged by Miss Ida Scott, 
who has secured the Colonial Ballroom of 
the St. Francis Hotel for the purpose. 

The concerts will take place on alter- 
nate Monday afternoons at 4:30 p. m., and 
last for an hour. American and particularly 
resident musicians will interpret the pro- 
grams. 

The greatest care is being taken in build- 
ing up these programs, which will include 
almost exclusively, new and unhackneyed 
numbers. Many of them are the work of 
resident composers and Miss Scott assures 
us that a great surprise is in store for those 
who fancy that we must always go far afield 
for creative material. 



AMERICAN-MADE TOILET REQUISITES 

For many years past there seems to have 
been the impression among American people 
that perfumes, toilet waters, and in fact all 
toilet requisites must bear the name "Paris" 
to contain high grade materials. This im- 
pression is wrong, as there is nothing to pre- 
vent the American manufacturer from ob- 
taining his materials from the same sources 
as do the French. These materials can be 
obtained in their unrefined state, on which 
duty is less, and the finished product can 
be produced for a very much lower cost. 

Marmun Toilet Requisites contain only the 
purest materials; both domestic and imported 



CALIFORNIA 

PLATE & WINDOW 
• GLASS * 

COM P A N V. 

14-77 EDDY ST' 
SAN FPANCI9CO. 



PMOME 
WKJT 

36' O. 




w hen in nceil of gbUM wi.rk. rep: 

new «,>rk of nnjr kind, call on o 



teome our >nti-.Heil customers 

imriinteed. 



n* anil 
Ml work 



are used. Madame Marie has made the skin, 
hair and scalp a life study; her products 
are guaranteed. Our little booklet "Retain 
Your Beauty" will teach you how. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



The President's 
Funeral — 



Those o£ you who were 
fortunate enough to get 
a copy of The Chronicle 
last Sunday know the 
quality of the pictures 
used in illustrating the 
San Francisco rites for 
our late President. 
There are two more 
pages next Sunday. 
These were taken in 
Washington at the 
White House and at 
Marion. You will, of 
course, wish them to 
complete your collection 
of the President's fun- 
eral pictures. 

The Coolidge 
Family 

Is also featured again 
this week in seven il- 
lustrations, showing 
the President and Mrs. 
Coolidge at their coun- 
try home, and in Wash- 
ington. Other interest- 
ing views show "A 
Page of People," "In 
San Francisco's China- 
town." "Royalty and 
Rulers" and so m e 
charming views of mi- 
laily's "Kins." Avoid 
disappointment, a n d 
place your order now 
for The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



i.alaxxi; 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAT RANT AM) 

(Kill. 

3."> New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

< Formerly 

bek<;ez franks 

OLn Pi >ODL.E DOG. 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A 91-25 French Pinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From .*» p. n». 

to 9 p. m. 

AN.. A I. a (arte 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



August 25, 1923 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 85c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Kodakers' Attention! 

Get your films developed 

FREE 

In a high class Photo Laboratory 

If purchased at Leboire & Stuart Drug 
Stores. Phone Franklin 7300 

Waldorf Drug Store 500 Ellis St. 

Potrero Pharmacy 2295 Third St. 

Precita Drug Co 580 Precita Ave. 

Agents for Magic Writing Pad 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burlinrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo YFoodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francinco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 



Telephone Market 64 



San Francisco 




Removing Crankshaft End Play 

End play in the crankshaft of an automo- 
bile produces a peculiar sort of a knock 
which is very annoying, not to mention the 
wear caused by the continued hammering. 
Bucking and uneven running may also be 
attributed to this cause. On the Ford, this 
condition also causes hard starting due to 
the increased distance between the magnets 
of the magneto. Lights which receive their 
power from the magneto will also be af- 
fected, varying in intensity as the armature 
of the magneto changes its position. The 
remedy usually applied is to replace one of 
the main bearing caps which takes up the 
lost motion. A less expensive, and equally 
effective repair may be made by using a 
special shim. The ends which are bent over 
take up the play between the webs of the 
crankshaft. It is a good plan to file an extra 
amount of metal from the bearing cap, so 
that the usual thickness of shims may be 
used in addition to the special shim. Then, 
when it becomes necessary to take up on 
the bearings, the special shim need not be 
disturbed. 



Hclding BoJts While Tightening 

To tighten bolts which require the use of 
two wrenches, one on each end, is frequently 
a two-man job, as it is impossible to reach 
both ends of the bolt at the one time. A 
mechanic, being left to himself when tight- 
ening the crankcase bolts, employed a stunt 
which is well worth remembering. First se- 
curing a block of soft wood, he placed it 
against the bolt head on the under side of 
the machine, and raised the jack against 
the block, so that the weight of the car 
caused the bolt to sink into the block. The 
bolt was thus held securely while the nut was 
tightened. 



Replacing Gaskets 

When replacing the lower half of the 
crankcase, care must be exercised in locat- 
ing the cork gasket so that it will clear all 
the bolt holes. Failure to observe this point 
may result in the bolts breaking the gasket 
around the holes so that oil leaks will be 
produced. A good plan to follow when do- 
ing this work is to fasten the gasket to the 
lower half of the crankcase with paper clips, 
such as are used for fastening papers to- 
gether. The clips are left in position until 
the bolts are nearly drawn up, when they may 
be removed without danger of the gasket 
shifting. 



"John, what on earth induced you to buy 
a house in this forsaken district?" 

"One of the best men in the business." — 
Hamilton Royal Gaboon. 



Adjoining: Columbia and Curran Theaters 
Geary and Mason. Phone Prospect 61 





t- ■ — V. 






1 

M4&J 




~ ttJI 










{ 


i 


1 


Dinner and Cabaret Every Evening 


THELMA 

A Broadway Danc- 
ing Sensation 


Jack 
HOLLAND 

And His Beauty 
Revue 



N'OTIC'K TO CRKIHTOKS. 

estate of Michael Madden, deceased, No. 37033 
Dept. No. 1". 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
Michael Madden, deceased, to the creditors of 
and all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
or to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 
within four (4) months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice to the said administrator, at 
his office, 858 Phelan Building. San Francisco, 
California, which said last-named office the un- 
dersigned selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of Michael 
Madden, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of 
Michael Madden. Deceased. 

Dated, San Francisco. California. August 9, 
1923, 
CULLINAN & HICKEY. 

Attorneys for Administrator. 



An Exclusive Radio Store 

Authorized Dealers for All Standard 
Radio Equipment 

Service, Help on Construction, 
Diagrams 

Manufacturing Repairing Installation 

We are as Close to You As Your 
Phone 

MILLER-TAYLOR RADIO CO. 

C. E. MILLER H. M. TAYLOR 

1403 Bush St. San Francisco, Calif. 

(at Polk) Phone Prospect 65 75 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

131S Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



St. Mary's 
cAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

n 

For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Ifetween Frnnklln and Gough 
Telephone Park 271 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




Practice limited to 


EYE, 


EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 


Hours 


10 to 5 — By Appointment — 


Saturday 


10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Kemoved to Suite 581 I.iebes Hldg. 




177 POST STREET 




Sun Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit-* PreNKed by Hand, Only — 

Suits fulled Tor uml Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

PurNiiiii Dyeing und Cleunlnff 
■ins Manon St. rintiie Franklin 2510 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Papers and Mnnuscript Covers 

'■pintle a lltllr Letter than kmitii necessary" 
The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable h.>x.>s o.mtaining five Hundred perfect 
sheets plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers lire sold in similar Poxes containing one 
hundred sheets Order through your printer or 
Stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Few People Take Proper Care ofTheir Teeth 

Some think that a vigorous brushing once 
or twice a day Is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfield 836 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crown*; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Purcelain Work 
and Koofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 

CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-G And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 61! Geary Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Prank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 1 74 Phelan Ruilrifng San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER RT.TLPING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Plione Kearny 391 San Francisco 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 695 Douglas 4772 

Perpetual Care Fund 

On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL. 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRA.NC1SCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint 10b guaranteed for 
two yt'ars. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call" 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

Ifiofi CALIFORNIA STREET 

Prospect 3418 -Phone**- Prospect 34 1 ft 

WHAT 1SKST HBKYKN THE I'UBLIC 

REST SKRVE- H» 



1140 Geary Street ~m- Te , Fran klin SflR", 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Mrtal U .irk l|tprrralnlajE **» AalmnohllM 

«>\ \ -Acvtjtenc Welding — Blarkumllhing 

II. W. Culver H. 1»«l»erer E. John •on 




him in* 

'mi in- ; ". : 

'Mr i rill ,ife~ -t ■ ! 

■'.. M '.. '■>«►,!■" 



Hotel Oakland 

is an ideal place to en- 
tertain your friends. 
Luncheons, Teas and 
Dinners in our spac- 
ious dining rooms or 
private functions all 
carefully attended to. 

Dancing Wednesday 
and Saturday nights in 
the beautiful Ivory 
Ball Room. Dinner 
dances every Saturday 
night. 



%Pkla#' 



MOTEL PL A7A 

Jan FRANCISCO 



65c 

Luncheon 



Good food, quiet pleasant 
surroundings and carefu 1 
prompt service. 
Post Street at Stockton. 




Announcement 




San Francisco Law School 

74 New Montgomery St.. Third Floor, Call Building 

FOUR-YEAR COURSE 
EVENING SESSIONS 

FOR 

MEN AND WOMEN 

CLASSES CONVENE 

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER FIFTH 

THE SECRETARY WILL BE AT THE 

OFFICE EVERY EVENING 6:45 TO 8:00 

EXCEPTING SATURDAYS AND HOLIDAYS 

Telephone For Appointment At 
Other Times — Kearny 4251 



Announcement! 



2d_LS 



HE Western Vacuum 
Ice Co. of San Fran- 
cisco, a California Cor- 
poration, formed for 
the purpose of manufacturing; Ice, 
is now financing', and persons in- 
terested can obtain all informa- 
tion at our offices. 



Allotments on subscriptions made in order of receipt 



ROWELL & CO., 

FISCAL AGENTS 

883 Mills Building Phone Douglas 2958 

(This notice will not appear again) 



Established July 20, 1856 




PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 192 






[ 



Egyptian Cjirl 




From the oil painting 
by Spencer Macky 



1 Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

,105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Height and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4}/jJ 

per cent per annum was declared. Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable, can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be seit you on request. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 
Two Wall 
street 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital (15,000,000 S15.000.000 Btiure Food 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city -with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1 .75 




.•ll>-lO l«4* 



N. W. CORNER 




The longer ph brew- 

(Swell's 

^^MTIONAL CREST 

(offee 

-the better itgets* 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Telephone Direct 
Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
1,800,000 cuph were served at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International Exposition. 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 




EtUblUticd July SO. 163* 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CHI. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF., SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER I, 1923 



No. 9 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWSLETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. 3S2 Russ Building. Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco. Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif.. Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office. Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England, 
Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 : Canada, one year. $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 



— The "stranded" rum ship, so-called by the daily papers, is 
fifteen miles from any strand. 

* * * 

— It is reported that if Stresemann fails then Germany will face 
chaos. The quicker the better and let France go right on to Berlin. 

— President Coolidge seems to exemplify the most extraordinary 
achievement among statesmen or politicians. He knows enough to 
let well enough alone. 

— The German mark, we are told by cable, has sunk "into the 
abyss." Well, it is just as useful there as anywhere else. Might 
fill that abyss with it and do away with the abyss forever. 

— In Madrid they tried to lynch a toreador "because he was 
lazy" the other day. That is a very good plan. They should hang 

all the lazy ones first and then shoot the active ones. 

* * * 

— McAdoo has called Ford a liar. McAdoo did not use the short 
and ugly word but he called him that anyway and Ford has said 
that McAdoo was "the creature of certain interests" during the war. 

This is all very interesting, if any of it is true. 

* * * 

— Amundsen, it is announced, will try the Pole flight in 1924. 

These flights to the Pole are just about as useful to mankind as 

teaching an elephant to knit socks. There must be something in it, 

besides frost bites, for the dear old Amundsen man. 
■v * * 

— Poincare's speeches at the unveiling of monuments and tablets 
dedicated to those of the Allies who helped win the war, gives him 
an opportunity to answer his detractors from abroad and to defend 
the course taken by France. What is he going to do when he reaches 
the point where there are no more monuments and no more tablets 

to dedicate? 

* * * 

—Here is a new record. It is reported from Hollywood that a 
tot there, of 3' '% years of age, has just had signed for her a con- 
tract which will give her five million dollars for three years of 
filming. These cinema magnates pay out their money just as though 
it was a case of German marks. Well, except for advertising pur- 
poses, perhaps that is just what it all amounts to, anyhow. 



— The public whipping post should be revived and the gangsters, 
when convicted, should precede whatever jail sentence is given them 
by being publicly whipped. Public whipping will go a very long 
way toward curing the gangster's desire for posing in the lime light. 

— The richest piece of humor coming across the sea quite nat- 
urally emanates from Ireland. It is now reported that de Valera 
offers that, if given the two and a half million dollars tied up in 
a New York bank, he will accept his pardon and go away and sin 
no more against the Irish Free State. 

— These "girls," who came back from Java and China, and re- 
port that near-riots had taken place in order to prevail on them to 
remain in Asia with Asian husbands are pulling off good publicity 
stuff. But, while they were away, the advertising men adopted the 
slogan of truth in advertising. Now, what are the poor girls going 
to do? 

— Hiram and his political manager are all astir as to how the 
letter was stolen. The public is not at all interested in that part 
of the sensation. What the public is interested in is that it believes 
everything Hiram said of himself and does not understand why 
there should be any attempt on his part to belittle his ability in 
diagnosing his own case. 

* * * 

— There is no end to the fools, wise fools and other kinds. Here 
is a professor, J. T. House, who teaches the young ideas in the 
Nebraska State Normal school, the literary branch of an education, 
who undertakes to crawl 160 miles on one hand and on one knee, 
in order to prove that one Hugh Glass, credited with having per- 
formed a like feat, after a fight with a grizzly bear, could have 
done so. Can you beat that? 

* * * 



— The dispute of the coal miners and their employers is up again 
for solution by the employers. Evidently, the capitalists and the 
laborers could not arrive at a satisfactory conclusion in conversa- 
tion with Mr. Coolidge and his advisers. It is too bad that regu- 
larly every winter, this same old labor contention comes up for ad- 
justment. John Hays Hammond, who was the chairman of the Com- 
mission, will issue a statement as to who is to blame. 
* * * 

— Mustapha Kemal Pasha has played a rough trick on his wife 
and the other female suffragists of Turkey. He has used these as 
he formerly used the prohibitionists. Now that he has what he 
wanted he has thrown equal suffrage overboard and the women 
of Turkey are forbidden to participate in Turkish politics. They 
may not even use the innocent name of "women's committee" when 
they meet to squabble over equal rights. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 1, 1923 



S If xH^Y: ;: ::;;;; ss :::::: :f S If :f If If I: I: ::::::::^?g gsgglfsT::: If !?:?;: ::s::K):: ;:::::-:: S x :;;;:::;;;;: i ;■:::: S s: 5 ^ST^lSSSSSSHSSSggSS^SgaSlSwa 

I 

I 



itoiy ©f line Sao Kraarage© News Letter 

FROM THE 60TH ANNIVERSARY NUMBER, 1916 



(HlKSfl: J: ?:: I: If lflfs|:^|c Iff: If If l?SS^^ 



IN THE later '50's, here in San Francisco, overland mail was car- 
ried by pony express across the continent to St. Louis. Conse- 
quently, only letter mail was carried because of the high cost, $5 
per half ounce. 

In the earlier '50's, newspapers were all sent abroad via the Pana- 
ma line of steamers to New York. That line furnished the only 
comparatively fast time in news connection with the outside world. 
Fred Marriott, Sr., had founded a number of papers, among them 
the present Illustrated London News. He was no novice in the pub- 
lishing business. In looking over the field, he decided to furnish 
a publication that would appeal to the public on its merits and the 
extraordinary conditions regarding mail facilities then prevailing 
in the community. He conceived the idea of publishing in digest 
form the news of the city and State, and at the same time fulfill 
all the essential requirements for its carriage through the mails at 
the same rate as an ordinary letter. His novel idea and the form 
of his periodical was given the appropriate name of "The News 
Letter." 

The first issue was published July 20, 1856, and was printed on a 
very thin, dull blue paper, four pages the size of a letter. The 
first two pages were covered with the general news of the day in 
short paragraphs and with advertisements. Some of the firms of 
that pioneer period are still in business in this city. The last two 
pages were left blank, so that the third page might be used for a 
letter and the fourth page for writing the address of any one abroad 
to whom the subscriber or purchaser might care to mail it. The 
idea was at once a hit with the community, and The News Letter, 
backed by its timely news and the personal news of its senders, 
was conspicuous in the outgoing mails of the regular steamers. Later, 
The News Letter in its light and unique form of four pages, was 
readily carried by the Pony Express messengers across the plains. 

Thus the latest news was delivered in the East and throughout 
the world many days in advance of the local daily newspapers. 

At that time there were no telegraph lines across the continent. 
The only form of telegraphing in practical use was on Telegraph 
Hill, where there was a station and a like station on a hill near the 
present Cliff House, facing the Pacific Ocean. The look-out there 
had a strong telescope. When a vessel hove in sight he hoisted a 
flag on his station. The look-out on Telegraph Hill immediately 
hoisted a flag on his station. The merchants at the foot of the hill 
would see that flag and immediately prepare to go to the Post Office 
to get the mail brought them by the steamer. 

In 1865, on the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, rioters at- 
tacked the newspapers that were against the franchising of the 
negro, and destroyed their plants. The mob looted numbers of offices. 
Among these were the Examiner and News Letter. 

Always fearless and independent, supporting the weak against 
the strong, the right against the wrong, the News Letter of that day 
naturally made many enemies and many staunch friends. 

In 1875 the city and State was overrun with quack doctors; 
hundreds of men styled themselves doctors who had never studied 
medicine or attended a medical school. The News Letter forthright 
published a list of these men each week for over a year, and finally 
introduced a bill into the legislature to compel any one claiming 
to be a doctor to have a diploma from an accredited medical school. 
The five hundred quacks subscribed $100 each, and also had a 
bill introduced into the State legislature similar to that which the 



News Letter desired passed, but had added to it the clause "except 
men now practicing." The sack provided by them was big enough 
to pass their bill, but the notoriety given the quacks by the News 
Letter reached every part of the State, so that practically all the 
quacks had to retire. Following this campaign, the News Letter 
planned a campaign to expose trade frauds so as to prevent the 
adulteration of food and drink, short weights and measures. Hun- 
dreds of articles of food and drink were analyzed. The analyses 
were published from week to week until Congress took the matter 
up and passed the bills now in force. 

In 1910 the News Letter started a vigorous fight for good roads, 
and has consistently maintained it. The press throughout the State 
became interested, and through the suggestion of the News Letter 
no aspirant for the legislature would be supported unless first pledged 
for good roads. With this movement was the start of the $18,000,- 
000 bond issue. 

Today California has the best roads in the United States. 

The race tracks about the bay were for years run in such an 
iniquitous manner that through the continued exposure in the News 
Letter of the dishonest practices of the management it was event- 
ually closed. In this campaign, the proprietor of the News Letter 
was nearly murdered for his endeavors. 

The News Letter has been a kindergarten that has developed an 
unusual number of the brainiest and best known writers on the 
Pacific Coast, writers that later developed national and, in many 
instances, international reputations. Among them were: 

James F. Bowman, Frank C. Cremony, Bret Harte, Will Clemens 
(Mark Twain), W. T. Carleton, Ambrose Bierce, Frank M. Prixley, 
James T. Watkins, Gomer Evans, D. W. C. Nesfield, Frank G. Gass- 
away, T. A. Harcourt, R. E. White, Thomas J. Vivian, A. F. Balch, 
Mrs. Jos. Austin, Ashton Stevens, Hubert Henry Davies (the pres- 
ent dramatist), Wallace Irwin, Ed. F. Moran, Stephen Massett 
"Jeems Pipes of Pipesville"), Rev. Wm. S. Harvey, Harvey Brown, 
J. 0. Hara Cosgrove, John Finlay, Gertrude Atherton, Wm. M. 
Neilson, P. N. Beringer, John Melville, Daniel O'Connell, Pete Big- 
elow, Fred Emerson Brooks, Jack London, Frank Norris, Sam Davis, 
Alice Ballard Rix, A. J. Waterhouse, Eliza D. Keith, Mrs. Kate 
Waters, John H. Gilmore, Adolphe Danziger, W. C. Morrow. 

Frank A. Nankevel, the artist, got his first start on the News 
Letter. 

Many interesting, noteworthy and historical illustrations have ac- 
companied the News Letter in its issues from time to time since 
1856. One of the most notable was "At the Play," accurately de- 
picting three hundred men prominent in San Francisco at that time. 
Nearly all are dead now, so that copies of the work are very valu- 
able, although 30,000 copies were printed. The series of "Men We 
Know," which ran several years, set forth the traits and characters 
of the prominent financiers, professional and business men of that 
interesting period of commonwealth building. The series of "Ar- 
tistic Homes" ran several years. This series had an extraordinary 
effect on people in the East, who had never seen San Francisco. 
They could now visualize our environment. Having heard of us as 
a wooden city we were pictured as a lot of peaked roofs. When 
the beautiful and artistic homes were illustrated in the pages of 

(Continued on page 9.) 



September 1, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




— Charlie Neumiller, of Stockton, reputed a Hiram Johnson 
leader, was in from the river metropolis and seemed to be scenting 
the air around the bay for signs of a fight. He is an ex-prison di- 
rector. By the way, what a pageant an array of the Johnson ap- 
pointees would make, as illustrating the steps taken to build up a 
machine in politics? 



up as serenely as ever; and then there is re-apportionment, too, and 
several other things to bedevil the voters. Our sympathies go first to 
the Secretary of State and next to the people. 

— Charter amendments galore will feature the San Francisco bal- 
lot. If any kind of thing needing mending has been forgotten haste 
should be made to incorporate it in the measures to be voted for. 
The more you can lay on the voter's mind at this particular time the 
better. 



— McCallum is saying nothing at all but his friends are certainly 
ready to whoop it up for him on all occasions. Well, McCallum is 
bound to make an interesting race after anything to which he may 
aspire. He is a good business man and his friends are many who 
hold to it that his tenure of the Harbor commission job could not 
have been beaten. 



— William F. Benedict, the assistant secretary of the mayor, has 
been named his campaign manager. Rolph is bound to make a 
great campaign and he will need the capable help of just such an 
efficient organizer as Benedict. There are very few men, in politics 
in San Francisco, who have the keen insight as to probabilities as 
those possessed by his new manager. The mayoralty campaign prom- 
ises, because of the numerous candidates, to be made most interest- 
ing and on account of the numbers running for office, may result 
in landing such a man as Eugene Schmitz in the place. 



— George Radcliff, the chairman of the State Board of Control, 
visited the new State Building, at the Civic Center, last week. Mr. 
Radcliff was non-commital on all questions as to politics and said 
the visit was one which was devoted purely to business matters. 
That is an ideal state of mind, for a man holding his responsible 
position, but, despite the assertion, there were those in San Fran- 
cisco who held to the view that Radcliff was doing quiet and effec- 
tive political work while here. 



— Mrs. Mabel Dorn-Hirst is credited with saying that she wishes 
to preside over the woman's court. That is certainly a most laudable 
ambition. Mrs. Dorn-Hirst is the daughter of the late N. A. Dorn, 
superior judge of Monterey County. Some of the daily papers seem 
to think that, comparatively a young woman, Mrs. Dorn-Hirst is 
doubly qualified for the position she is seeking because she is not 
only a mother but a grandmother. She is thoroughly identified in 
the various women's clubs of the State and is very well known. 



We are not going to escape the blanket sheet ballot, which 

most people vote on without a proper knowledge of what they are 
voting for. What a boon to the printer and paper maker these 
amendments are and what a pestiferous amount of thought they 
impose on the conscientious man or woman voter. Not only a blan- 
ket ballot but a book of many pages, with very fine print to make 
it as illegible as possible, will have to be provided. Secretary Jor- 
dan is getting wild-eyed with overwork these days and so are all of 
his assistants. There will have to be arguments for and against at 
least fourteen amendments. That alone is a man-sized job. Then 
there are several iniative measures, and these include the five hun- 
dred million dollar water and power act; the Mother Lode High- 
way bond issue; the proposed act, to make the community property 
law more palatable; the attempt to legalize the pari-mutuel in horse 
racing, and a boxing amendment; the repeal of the Wright law: the 
aged and ever-young attempt to inflict single tax on us will bob 



— Supervisor Warren Shannon is out for a supervisorship again 
and he is starting an effective campaign to land himself in office 
by re-election. His program is an ambitious one and it consists of — 
more schools, a larger water supply, improvement of highways and 
the completion of the Hetch Hetchy. There can be nothing to com- 
plain about in such a program. 



— Al. G. Faulkner is going to make a hot race for the supervisor- 
ship and is lining up his forces for the race. He is guaranteed the 
help of Thomas Lee Woolwine, the erstwhile District Attorney of Los 
Angeles and defeated Democratic candidate for governor. Mr. Wool- 
wine is an able campaigner. Faulkner is credited with having sup- 
ported Woolwine, in his attempt to win out in the race for the 
governorship and Woolwine's assistance at this time is a recognition 
of that fact, it is said. James Woods, one-time manager of the Saint 
Francis Hotel, has also promised his assistance to Faulkner and will 
come up from Los Angeles to take a hand. Mr. Faulkner has a quite 
general endorsement by the automobile trade. 



— It is "busy days" among the politicians. Judge Elijah C. Hart 
and court clerk, are showing some interest in the probable chances 
on the bench, later on. Judge Hart is one of the Judges of the 
District Court of Appeals at Sacramento. J. Emmet Hayden is as 
busy as a hen scratching gravel. He is a candidate for re-election. 
Mr. Hayden is the second of the candidates to begin an active cam- 
paign. There are those of his friends who say that he cannot be 
beaten. Frank I. Turner is chairman for the coming campaign, for 
the United Voters organization. An advisory committee of fifty will 
assist Mr. Turner and the campaign manager, "Cap" Holliway. 



— There will be fur flying, when the Veteran's League and the 
Sheriff Tom Finn forces gather for the fray. The Sheriff's party has 
always been quite strong but the Leaguers seem to have a mental 
equipment of their own and have endorsed Supervisor Rock for 
Sheriff rather than Assemblyman Walter J. Rock, Watson's candi- 
date against Sheriff Finn. George W. Watson is the minority leader 
of the Republican committee for the Veteran's League and it is 
claimed, by his friends, that he will have the say as to the dis- 
tribution of all patronage. P. L. Kelly, head of the Garage Owner's 
Association, is out for supervisor. 



— F. A. Maestetti, who will be remembered as a member of the 
Board of Public Works in the Schmitz regime, and who is credited 
with being one of the most astute politicians in this city, is said 
to be out for the election of McSheehy for mayor. That fact ought 
to help make the mayoralty fight still more interesting. McSheehy 
is said to have the active support of Rudolph Spreckels and it is 
also said that this support is extended him on account of McSheehy 
having supported Spreckels in his water and power fight at the last 
election. Supervisor Eugene Schmitz is the sphinx as to candidacy 
just now. He is evidently waiting for all candidates to make them- 
selves known. His supporters claim that Schmitz may, in any event, 
count on just so many votes and that, if the candidates are numer- 
ous enough, he cannot help being elected. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September I, 1923 




Did it ever strike you that a purely benevolent 
Benevolent Exploiters society may be a very tyrannical concern, 

and that charitable organizations are among 
the greatest burdens which have to be carried by men of affairs? It 
is true nevertheless. We see that within forty-eight hours of his enter- 
ing upon the office of President, the new incumbent had to write a 
letter commendatory of the Knights of Columbus. We have not a 
thing against the Knights of Columbus; quite the contrary, they are 
a very noble and good organization. The President wrote the letter, 
a very good one. He will have to write on an average at least one 
such letter every day to some organization or other during the term 
of his presidency, and that is an entirely unnecessary addition to an 
almost unbearable load. These worthy people use the dignified office 
of the President as a means of advertising their excellent movements. 
Not sparing themselves, they do not spare the President, who belongs 
to all of us, and they kill him without any compunction in the pur- 
suit of their own laudable objects. This is thoughtless in the extreme, 
and it is also very unkind. The office has grown to be a slaughter- 
house for its occupants, who are killed, not by the big jobs on which 
they should be allowed to concentrate, but by the accumulated, 
piffling selfishness of people who should know better and who practi- 
cally murder their own chief official, for the purpose of ministering 
to their own piffling vanities and self-conscious benevolences. 



As everybody knows, we have taken no side in 
The Johnson Letter the Johnson controversy and have taken neither 

a Johnson nor anti-Johnson attitude, preferring, 
as a paper of criticism, to keep our minds open and to say what we 
like, whenever the occasion arises. Thus, editorially, we have taken 
the attitude against the League of Nations and the World Court for 
the simple reason that as good Americans we do not see any advan- 
tage for our country in such intervention in that respect. We have 
taken the same position, with some differences, regarding Senator 
Johnson. These differences arise in the method of approach to the 
problem for we consider that the Senator has a very rural and pro- 
vincial outlook, though his conclusions are fairly sound. As regards 
his domestic policies, we are against him much more strongly, as we 
do not agree with his attacks on corporations and are not with him in 
his altitude towards big business, and do not regard his approach to 
financial and industrial problems as at all scientific or even sensible. 
But there is one matter upon which we must agree with him, and 
sympathize with him for, and that is the matter of the private letter 
which was sent to Albert E. Boynton by Charles K. McClatchy, 
stolen from the files of the former and then published in a local paper 
here, af'.er being so stolen. Stealing private letters and publishing 
them is not nice. Indeed it comes as near blackguardism as anything 
can. We are sure of that. 



Ever since the war tests were made there has 
Intelligence Testing been much excitement over the intelligence of 

the country. Some, basing their results on the 
tests, have declared that we are going to the dogs and that the coun- 
try was for the most part under fourteen years of age in intelligence. 
The natural consequence of this reasoning is that a democracy is im- 
possible, as most people are incapable of deciding as to how they 
shall be governed. Wlio is to govern, then? The inevitable answer 
is, those who have intelligence. And those who have the intelligence 



are, of course, those who respond satisfactorily to the tests. But we 
have had some governments by intelligence, so to speak, and we 
don't like them. They may be governments by men of intelligence, 
but they are not intelligent governments, and ordinary farmers and 
mechanics can do better. Those tests were for the purpose of selecting 
an officer class for the army, which had to be selected in large num- 
bers in a short time and, as far as they went, they did their business 
very well indeed. But as tests of general intelligence they are as 
nothing, and are worse than valueless for political purposes. But one 
good thing has sprung out of all this discussion, that is a sincere de- 
sire and attempt to deal with the problem of subnormality in children 
and to build up character in the backward. Nothing can be said 
against this effort, which deserves every encouragement on economic 
and other grounds. 



You have driven with an unskilled automo- 
From Bad to Worse bilist and have found what had up to that time 

seemed to be a pleasant and successful drive, 
threatened all at once with tragedy. From a given moment every- 
thing that happened seemed to be unavoidable and, but for some un- 
foreseen deliverance, death and ruin were apparently inevitable. Such 
is the European situation today. At one time, it may have been at the 
very time of the signing of the Treaty of Versailles, it may not have 
been till last January, when the Ruhr expedition was undertaken, but 
at some time and place what up to then had been apparently a path 
of peace and recuperation, gradually resolved itself into an inevitably 
unrolling tragedy, with chaos and the fall of a whole civilization at 
the end of the wild ride. 

This last week the situation has grown even more threatening than 
it was a week ago. France, through M. Poincare, has stated that her 
minimum requirements have already been set forth and that she is 
about to pursue to the bitter end, regardless of what may happen on 
the road on which she has entered. Great Britain goes very softly and 
slowly, protesting, and nothing more. But behind the protest the 
forces are gathering. The lineup in Great Britain is proceeding. Lord 
Rothmere, with his group of papers, is demanding that Great Britain 
support France all the way, and that the entente be preserved at any 
cost whatsoever. This represents the conservative and particularly 
the great landholding wing and powerful investors who regard France 
as the pivot around which must revolve all the factors that will pre- 
serve Europe from red revolt that is, in their opinion, threatening. 
The rest of Great Britain, both labor and industrial, is against France 
in the matter as they urge that the French policy of the destruction 
of Germany will destroy Great Britain also and that the industry of 
Great Britain can not survive a dislocated Europe. They see a nation 
of forty millions of people slowly starving to death, because of the 
disturbance of the markets of Europe on which these people depend 
for a living. So that bit by bit the struggle, from a purely theoretical 
one as regards the wisdom of a certain political step, becomes a very 
urgent one of actual food and life necessities. We know how such 
controversies have been settled in the past. We have no assurancei 
that they will not be settled in the same way in the future. Yet we 
also know that a new war is nothing short of the destruction of the 
modern world as far as that world is represented on the continent of 
Europe. Still, miracles have saved many an unskilled driver and a 
miracle may yet save Europe. 



Admiral Sims says that when he visited Great 
The Air Flights Britain with the American fleet during the war he 

found most of the statesmen in profound discour- 
agement and worry over the submarine situation. Alone, among them 
all, Lloyd George preserved his equanimity and was never downcast 
over the result. He based his cheerfulness upon the conviction that 
where there is a definite material problem to be solved, the wit of 



September 1. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



man can always meet the situation. Events justified his faith. It is 
the same with the air problem. The last week has put the control of 
the air for practical uses of man beyond any question, and the time 
has already arrived when we can depend upon air transit, with prac- 
tically the same certainty as is attached to the forms of locomotion 
with which we have hitherto been made familiar by use. In other 
words, the air has now been subdued so as to meet the necessities of 
man and air transit has attained the position of a practical, solvable, 
and therefore, commercial human asset. What that means to the 
future, time alone can show, but it would seem as if a new power had 
been added to those already in the possession of man, and that man 
takes another stride forward to the domination of that portion of the 
universe which he has come to occupy. "And God gave him 
dominion," says the old Book and, surely, its sayings in that regard 
are being more and more justified by events in recent days. Of 
course, whether such dominion will make for human happiness and 
whether the additional power will benefit him, depends upon man 
himself. 



We have the advantage of a woman as a 
Supervisorial Amenities supervisor and this woman has in some 

directions shown skill in carrying off the 
duties of her office. About a week ago, however, she showed very 
effectually a weakness, seemingly inherent in womankind. The super- 
visors were having one of their little spats, at the public's expense, 
when Margaret Mary took a hand, in an attempt to quell the 
squabble. Then one of the supervisors addressed her as "Margaret 
Mary" and told her she was losing her usually sweet disposition, or 
words to that effect. "Margaret Mary" immediately forgot she was a 
supervisor and her anger rose. She turned on her tormentor and told 
him he was out of order. He paid not the slightest attention to the 
ruling as to parliamentary procedure, at which the winsome Mary 
Morgan almost tearfully told him he had forgotten she was a woman. 
Then somebody quickly put a motion to adjourn and the warfare 
ceased. 

If a woman may not make herself heard, or assert some right as a 
supervisor or because she holds an official position, she nearly always 
finds a refuge and a hope for success in the fact that she is a mere 
woman. And that is, on her part, an acknowledgment of weakness as 
well as a resort to something with which it is unfair to obtain the 
coveted advantage. A supervisor is a supervisor, just as a clerk is a 
clerk, a stenographer a stenographer, or a delivery boy a delivery 
boy. In the language of Main Street, sex should "cut no ice at all." 
But where these women are concerned and hold offices or jobs, sex 
does "cut a lot of ice," and the sex of the office or job holder is very 
often used to the fullest extent, either to obtain unearned and un- 
deserved advantages or to escape an equal right to be adversely 
criticized by a male. 



With the improvement which is taking place 
The Shipping Business in our export and import business, there has 

also appeared a corresponding very tangible 
improvement in freight and passenger business on the seas. We 
have a vast number of vessels tied up in harbors and rivers, wait- 
ing for this improvement to express itself and. now that it is com- 
ing, we should not be slow to take every possible advantage of the 
new situation and vessels should be sent to sea as soon as possible. 
Shipping men tell us that numbers of the vessels, that are laid up. 
are not at all calculated for numerous reasons to take up compe- 
tition with the vessels of other nations but that there are quite 
enough vessels that may successfully compete so that we need not 
worry as to running out of future sea tonnage. 



A VERY EVIDENT NEED 

Now that the purchase of the Market Street System of street 
cars by the Municipal lines is practically assured to take place soon 
it is time to consider the routing of vehicular traffic, so as to make 
Market and Mission streets one-way thoroughfares. With the street 
railway service under one management, a greater number of cars 
will be handled more easily than they are at present under two 
managements and the result will be bad if the continual conges- 
tion is allowed to take place as it does now with the streets two- 
way thoroughfares. If the street car lines were not to be combined the 
reason for the creation of one-way streets would be more urgently 
necessary. There can be no good reason why this arrangement cannot 
be effected. It has been successfully installed in other cities and 
has solved problems of traffic congestion that seemed much more 
difficult of solution than those afforded by San Francisco. Let 
us have one-way streets, wherever one-way streets will help out 
in a solution of street traffic congestion. 



SARAH DIX HAMLIN 

The name is most familiar to Californians and especially so to 
those who have lived for any length of time around the bay of 
San Francisco because Miss Hamlin has been beloved of all who 
have had children in her charge. Her passing on is mourned as the 
passing of a dearly beloved friend rather than as a woman of the 
world or as a teacher. She, however, very easily stood in the fore- 
front of the women of the State who have worked unselfishly for 
the creating of a better and a nobler citizenship. Miss Hamlin had 
lived in San Francisco for over half a century and, since 1896, had 
been the owner and principal of the school bearing her name. 

It was twenty-five years ago that Miss Hamlin purchased the 
Van Ness Seminary and gave it its present name. Miss Hamlin was 
prominent in Grace Cathedral and was one of the founders of the 
Century Club. 



— What is the meaning of these attacks on women? There are 
more than appear in the press for, now and again, as in the case 
of Mrs. Corraro, women are forced forward by police pressure to 
admit that they have been attacked and were keeping the matter 
in concealment for fear of publicity. That is the worst of that kind 
of crime; for it is an unfortunate fact that being the victim of such 
violence after all militates against the victim, to some extent and 
there is a natural repugnance against admission of what has hap- 
pened. Still the police cannot achieve results without the active 
support of the victims. 



— It should be made compulsory by law that back yards are kept 

in order by owners or tenants or both. Most back yards, even in 

otherwise attractive resident districts, are eye sores instead of being 

blooming garden spots, while in the apartment house sections they 

are often mere dump heaps. The Board of Health or Board of 

Public Works should be called upon to look into this matter; also 

into the filthy condition of vacant lots. And if the city government 

isn't rich enough to keep the city clean, it should compel owners 

of property to keep their premises clear of rubbish. 

+ . . —. * 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



I 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, ! 



and tea from 3 to 5 



I 



^^dTV* 334 SUTTER STREET Douglas 71 18 . 
„ — , — . . . — i ■-- ■ -■♦ 



and. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 1, 1923 



P. G. & E. Company Aids Industrial Development of 

Pacific Coast 



By CHARLES F. GALLAGHER, Industrial Engineer 



IN the olden days before transportation and communication was 
as efficient and well established as it is today, many newspaper 
men, editors and publishers confined their columns to discussions 
of industrial projects largely on what they thought about them and 
what they had gathered from bocks or other people's verbal opinions. 

But today things are very much the opposite. 

Last week over 150 editors and publishers representing the news- 
papers and publications of over thirty-six counties in California 
visited in person the Spaulding-Drum Development of the Pacific 
Gas and Electric Co. and spent two days in a most minute and de- 
tailed investigation of the entire project. These newspaper men 
visited the dams, lakes, power houses, pen stocks, distribution units, 
construction units, not in a general haphazard manner, but care- 
fully investigating every feature, climbing down the vast sides of 
the Lake Spaulding Dam and climbing up over 140 steps inside 
the giant concrete structure, or yet again walking over 450 steps 
from Lake Spaulding and then journeying 2'/> miles on foot over 
the flume which leads to the Drum Power House. At Drum the 
party journeyed in a cable tramway on an 85 % grade 1300 feet 
down the steep sides of the tree-covered canyon to the beautiful 
concrete power house at this location. 

After investigating the large water wheels, motors and genera- 
tors, dinner was served in the open air in front of the club house 
to approximately 250 guests, including officers and employes of 
the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Deep down in the canyon, the open 
air dining room was festooned with a multitude of beautifully col- 
ored Chinese lanterns electrically illuminated and, as the sun grad- 
ually receded over the peaks until it touched the topmost point of 
the ridged crest, lighting the sky and clouds above in the pastel 
shades of those gorgeous colorings known only to those who seek 
the heights of Nature's strongholds, and the faint shades of night 
gathered over that snug retreat in the vast citadels of the high 
Sierras and the twinkling lights showing the pathway of the tram 
lying up over the mountain began to appear, there was not one 
present who could look around and refute the theory that modern 
industrial improvement is derogatory when placed in Nature's sur- 
roundings. 

One is struck with the beautiful polished cleanliness of the equip- 
ment, the buildings, the floors of every unit of this large company's 
properties. 

The Halsey and Wise power houses were next inspected and many 
of the newspaper men spent a large portion of their time asking 
a multitude of questions from the different superintendents and op- 
erators, showing a keen, earnest desire to know something of the 
great workings of this typically California organization and an ap- 
preciation for the work performed. 

Mr. F. A. Leach, Jr., vice president and general manager of the 
corporation, acted as host and was assisted by several of the other 
officers and employes in explaining the points visited. The city of 
Auburn was visited, where the Wise power house is located, the lake 
generating 1 6,750 H. P. Luncheon was served in the Crystal Springs 
Park, after which the party turned homeward to their respective 
localities. 

One cannot but be struck by the keen interest that a public service 
corporation has gained in the hearts of Californians, when men 
will leave their homes and districts and spend two days in viewing 



the purely industrial project and finding out just exactly what pro- 
gressive work is being done in California by the forward looking 
corporations such as the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. stands for. 
When one considers, however, that there is over two hundred mil- 
lion dollars invested by this company in territory covering 54,000 
square miles, serving 233 cities and towns, one can realize the close 
association that this company has with the public. In the past we 
have remarked upon the unfailing courtesy that seems to flow from 
president to ditch man, from pole man to general manager. Like 
electricity itself, all one needs to feel the effects of this current of 
courtesy is contact. The newspapermen, editors and publishers 
were loud in their praises of the high efficiency in both the con- 
struction and operation of all the plants of the Pacific Gas & Elec- 
tric Co. 

So quietly has the work of this company been effected, without 
ostentation or oratory, that many of the public are not familiar 
with the really valuable contribution that has been made to mod- 
ern civilization by the extensive development of the modern industry 
by this public utility. 

The future California is based upon its agricultural, industrial and 
irrigation development. Behind each of these three great divisions 
lies power, and the solution to the whole problem has been, and in 
our opinion always will be, ably worked out by this California cor- 
poration, which can be truly called in every sense of the word a 
Public Service Corporation. 



WILL A DAY COME? 

Will a day come in my chromatic life 
When I shall fail to tremble at the touch 
Of wind spice on my mouth, and will the clutch 
Of beauty start no mad tumultuous fife 
Rioting in my blood? Will the keen sun 
Find my heart callous to the pungent air? 
If one day all my body does not care, 
Oh, then, indeed, my quick life will be done! 
Could I lose the allure of fragrant ground, 
My eyes go blind to beauty of a tree? 
Then would the bright sky turn a dingy mound — 
Oh! life will end if drab days come for me. . . 
Then heap earth on me, cover my dull head, 
Forget me, lovely world, who am well dead! 
— From "Voices." 



Attractive Apartment 
TO LET 

Four sunny outside rooms. Unfurnished. 
Every modern convenience. Hardwood 
floors. Centrally located. 940 Jones St., 
near Bush. References required. 



September I, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




WVeyou 

HE/4RD IT? 



—Sir Henry Lucy tells this story of Mr. Lloyd George being ma- 
rooned, through a mistake of his chauffeur, on a deserted spot by 
night, during the war. 

"He walked on till he came in sight of a large building, which 
turned out to be the county lunatic asylum. The gatekeeper proved 
gruff, and to explain matters the visitor told him, 'I am the Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer.' 

" 'Yes, yes,' said the porter, gruffly. 'We've got six of 'em inside. 
You go out to the gate, turn to the left, and you'll get home before 
morning.' " 



— "That's rather a singular operation they performed on the 
Reed boy last week. I understand they operated on his head to make 
a better boy of him." 

"That isn't where you operate on me, dad, to make a better boy 
of me," rejoined the youthful male of the family. 



— A farmer asked a boy who had just graduated from high school 
what the head of the class was called. The young graduate at- 
tempted to explain that the one who made the highest average was 
the valedictorian, and that the one who made the next highest aver- 
age was the salutatorian. 

"Well," said the farmer, "that's pretty good. Are they sisters?" 



— A doctor who was making a call on one of his patients, a 
widow, said: "You are slightly morbid, my dear lady. You should 
look about and marry again." 

"Oh, doctor, is — is this a proposal?" 

"Allow me to remind you, madam, that a doctor prescribes medi- 
cine — but he doesn't take it." 



— A class of boys had been studying physiology, and one day the 
master told them to write a composition on the "Spine." Among 
the many amusing papers sent in was the following: "The spine 
is a bunch of bones that runs up and down the back and the skull 
sits on one end, and I sit on the other." 



BRETON SONG 

By Abbie Huston Evans 
Life is too short to love again. 
My loaf is given; come and see, 
I have not crumbs to feed a wren. 
So full a toll love took of me. 

iron chain of loyalty! 
In all the marching world of men 
There is no other face for me. 
Life is too short to love again. 

— From "Poetry." 



Some one has offered $10,000.00 for the best solution anent 
world peace. Try this and then forward check: Execute all poli- 
ticians and diplomats. 



Harry K. Thaw, adjudged criminal lunatic, is given twenty days' 
vacation from insane asylum. Radicals will acclaim this as cor- 
roborating a pet theory of theirs. 



STORY OF THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

(Continued from page 4.) 

the News Letter it was plainly shown that San Francisco could vie 
with any private building of stone in the East. 

Born July 16, 1805, in Enfield, England, at the time of the epic 
sea-fight of Trafalgar, Frederick Marriott, Sr., the founder of the 
News Letter, was also the founder of the present Illustrated London 
News. Associated with him was George Augustus Sala. Mr. Mar- 
riott sold his interest for 500 pounds sterling, and joined the East 
India Company in Calcutta. He came to San Francisco in 1850, and 
started the San Francisco News Letter in 1856. He died, December 
16, 1884, seventy-nine years of age. 



— One cannot help a great admiration for a man like Douglas 
Tilden, who, falling on evil days, in which he is unable to pursue 
his art, turns to mechanical work and without a word of irritation 
sets to work to save enough to open a studio afresh. And he has 
not a word to say against his mechanical work. In that he is not 
unlike the artists of the renaissance, who had no idea of being 
set apart like a Pekinese poodle because they ministered to the art de- 
mands of their aristocratic patrons. It is only recently that artists, 
literary and otherwise, have become snobs. 



In the old days school "took in" at 8:30 and "left out" 'twixt 
3:30 and 6; today, loiter around one of these institutions — espe- 
cially the high schools — from 1 p. m. on! As one bystanding wag 
remarked: "Counting the stunts, these kids are getting about one- 
half of one per cent of what's coming to them." 




// 



you pay $75.00 a 
month rent tor your 
present place of res- 
idence and it does 
not compare favor- 
ably with the home 
pictured below, you are not getting your money's worth. 
This new, modern borne contains six large rooms, fin- 
ished in perfectly matched .num. on a 50-foot lot with 
an unobstructed marine view, can be purchased in that 
incomparable property. Ingleside Terraces, for $75 per 
month. 

If von desire to live in a better environment, at no 
greater expense, come out Sunday and see this prop- 
erty. We will help you with the initial payment. A 
talk with us may surprise you. 

THINK IT OVER! 



LEONARD 
&HOLT 

39 Montgomery St. 
Tel. Sutter 7038 

Ingleside Terraces 

86 Cerritos Ave. 

Tel. Ran 4326 

■WE'RE ALIVE" 




10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September I, 1923 




o 



By REM 

VER THE FOOTLIGHTS, by Stephen Leacock. is principally an 
invasion of the American theatre by our foremost humorist, at 
least Thomas L. Masscn, former editor of Life, has so christened him. 

The first chapter, "Cast Up By the Sea," takes us back to the time 
before the movies "had addled the human brain and the radio broad- 
cast had disintegrated the human mind," to quote Leacock, and he 
makes us see the old-fashioned melodrama through to the last act, 
where everybody's saved — "the baby's the center of the stage on the 
eld man's knee, and the long separated couple in each other's arms 
and explanations flowing like autumn cider." This he ably contrasts 
with the modern play, "The Soul Call," one of the many present-day 
"piffle plays" dealing in one way or another with marriage, which 
used to in "art and literature constitute the happy ending. Now it is 
just the bad beginning." 

"The People We Meet in the Movies," especially the vampire 
woman "dowered with a fatal and mesmeric charm," whom Leacock 
has been vainly trying to discover in real life; "The Russian Drama," 
"The Historical Drama." "The Greek Tragedy" are chapters to pro- 
duce smiles, but the best one to share with a friend is "Radio — A New 
Form of Trouble," in which he tells us: "There are radio shops, radio 
fans and a whole growth of radio literature, magazines, journals, ad- 
vertisements and prize competitions. In fact, it's a 'world movement;' 
it takes its place right alongside of prohibition and psychoanalysis 
and the subconscious mind. In a very short time it will get into the 
moving pictures and on the stage and eat the heart out of literature." 
And then he gives us a radio novel in which the heroine sits in her 
cloistered room, the hero in his — each with their radio set, their 
amplifiers adjusted, their sparks at audio-frequency; miles apart, but 
listening to the broadcast, their antennae close-locked and their hearts 
throbbing in unison ; the hero not bothered about expense or the 
trouble of taking the heroine home. All he has to do is to 'cut her 
out' and she doesn't even nave to make up her complexion." 

Dodd. Mead & Co.. $1.50. 



IRONHEART. by William MacLeod Raine, is a story of the west- 
ern outdoors and a man who belonged to the "Lost Legion," namely, 
"There are those who have killed or buried so deep the divine fire of 
their manhood that for them there seems no chance of recovery in 
this world. There are those in whom still burns somewhere a faint 
candle that may yet flame to a dynamic glow of self-respect," and 
the author enlists our interest in one who has lost all that counts and 
yet comes back. There are plenty of exciting situations, a pretty, im- 
pulsive heroine, who, l:ke Queen Elizabeth knew a "real man" when 
she saw him — and we rejoice over the way she wins the "real man" 
from his terrible weakness, although it was a foregone conclusion 
that she would: but the story is well told and we can't help liking it 
and the way it lines up with the foreword: 

"But somehow when he's gone, you think a heap 

About his virtues — how he's square and true; 

If more come stringin' in they'd make it cheap. 

This friendship thing — and spoil it all for you." 

Houghton. Mifflin, $1.75. 



Books 


that are reviewed in the News Letter can b< 


obtained 






at PAUL ELDER'S 








AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 




239 P 


ost 


Street San 


Francisco 



Half the Month Remains 

-15 DAYS! 

September 15th is the last day 
of sale of round trip Excur- 
sion Tickets. 

BACK EAST 

Return Limit Oct. 31st 

FOUR ROUTES 
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Chicago 



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Detroit 105.62 



Philadelphia 144.92 

New Orleans 85.15 



ASK AGENTS 



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Ferry Station Third St. Station 

or Phone Sorter 4000 



The New Society Blue Book 



Wish to announce that they are now 
making ready for press. This book 
will contain the names and addresses, 
phones, etc.. of the most prominent 
families in San Francisco. Alameda 
County, Marin County. San Mateo 
County, etc. Also men and women's 
cubs of high social standing. 

For Reservations and Addresses, Communicate With 

Marguerite M. Pinchard, Publisher 

1659 Mason Street. Sun Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Franklin 6912. 

Subscription Price $0.00 Per Year. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

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FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM, 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 



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REASONABLE RATES 



September I, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



II 



TownM^crler 




Q WHO THEDEVILART THOU ' 
• — Kfv 0NE THAT WILL PLAY THE 

f^vffy p £wl ' s "> mt " y°u" 



—We cannot keep up with the new pedagogy and the fact that 
we are growing old is fast dawning upon us, in face of the new 
vocabulary which is being employed by instructors. Take our new 
superintendent of schools, and he comes out with the statement 
about "socialised recitation." That would sound at first to mean 
that old form recitation which used to prevail when children shouted 
stuff in common. It means nothing of the sort. It means any sort 
of recitation in which the pupils take the initiative. If children 
have not altered very much, that sort of a recitation should mean a 
general row and nothing else. Children are to have "more self- 
directed investigation." Lordy, as if the poor kids could investi- 
gate! Such big words they do use for such trivial things. We are 
terribly the victims of words. 

* * * 

— Chief Vollmer of Los Angeles is pushing ahead. To threaten 
to punch any politician on the nose who butted into the game, to 
alter the system for giving instructions to the police by means of 
lighting signals and to install a whole electric signalling apparatus, 
to proceed to clean up the hideous county jail all in a couple of 
weeks is doing work. But that idea of his of a special department 
to handle vehicular traffic is superb and should work wonders be- 
sides providing more jobs. That is the watchword, "economy com- 
bined with more salary." We could do anything, even here, on that 
basis, if we had a Vollmer. As for our own chief, he does well and 
should not have blank cartridges fired into the seat of his trousers. 

— Some have said that there is, on the part of youth, an un- 
conscious urge toward death. I am not a good enough psychologist 
to be able to express an opinion. But it is a curious fact that the 
recent accidents in the air, so far from alienating the air-experi- 
ment from popularity with young men, seems to have sharpened 
their interest and I am informed on good authority that never was 
there so much keenness in San Francisco for air-service as at the 
present. In spite of all the risk that is not surprising for risk is 
inseparable from romance and the air service is now practically 
the only romantic service left. In a short time it, too, will have 
become so certain as to have lost the greater part of its interest. 

— Some sort of a storm is brewing in the political world, apart 
from the usual activity at this time of the year. There are marked 
signs of informal gatherings at Sacramento and, in spite of the 
heat, more well known pohticians are to be seen on the streets than 
usual. There is also an air of silence and mystery about things as 
if there were pent up forces which might break loose and mysterious 
whisperings in shady, one cannot say cool, corridors. It is the gen- 
eral impression that the anti-governor forces are making prepara- 
tions for an immediate and violent attack, some say by way of the 

courts. Never was Sacramento more agitated. 
* * * 

— Whatever may be the defects of Vincent Riccardi over-modesty 
is not one of them, as witness his demand to be restored to the 
profession of law, in spite of all that he has gone through and the 
exhibition that he has made of himself. The Bar Association gave 
ten reasons why he should not be restored. Quite a catalogue of 
reasons, eh, particularly when systematic swindling of clients is 
urged as one of them. It would seem as if his career as an attorney 
is finished. 



—Some little idea of the vast growth of wealth in this district 
may be gathered from the fact that the new Galileo High School 
will cost in the neighborhood of six hundred and fifty thousand dol- 
lars. Our grandfathers would have thought such a sum quite in- 
credible for ordinary school purposes and we make no fuss at all 
about it but go on building more and more expensive schools with 
more and more expensive equipment. Do we, however, produce 
men whose value increases in proportion to the amount spent on 
them? That is the question. On the whole, it may be said that 
we do and we can comfort ourselves that, as far as humans go, 
we are abreast of the forward line. Even men pay for cultivating, 
though the race has been slow to learn the fact. 
* * * 

— It seems almost incredible that seventy-five per cent of the stu- 
dents at the state university, more than ten thousand in number, 
are partially at least supporting themselves during their educative 
period by outside work. It is doubtful whether there can be a simi- 
lar showing anywhere else in the world. Whether, on the whole, 
it is good is hard to say. Of course, if the student has a strong 
physique he may be able to do it, or she may, for there are more 
women making their own living than men. But it would appear 
as if little justice were being done to themselves and the best in- 
terests of the majority would be served by cutting out the university. 

* * * 

— District Attorney Brady surely does have a hard time with 
the women. Considering that he has given them an assistant in his 
own office and has taken every precaution to satisfy their whims they 
are after him hard. That is perhaps why. Now, this phalanx which 
invades the courtroom, sits and glowers at the court, threatens 
at least by gesture, witnesses, and generally takes possession of 
the public administration of justice must be cleaned out. They 
are like the knitting women in the French Revolution. Who is 
going to be brave enough to get rid of them? The fight might 
just as well be made now. 

* v f 

— Dean Orrin Kip McMurray, dean of the law department of 
the State University, is one of the greatest and soundest jurists in 
the United States. He ranks intellectually with the finest minds in 
the two hemispheres and but for the fact that he is located on the 
Pacific Coast would have no doubt had that national recognition 
that is his due. He has been away for a year at Columbia Uni- 
versity Law School, New York, and his return has been marked by 
recognition on the part of the Bar Association. There are few men 
who deserve such recognition. His opinions are highly regarded in 
Canada and Great Britain. 

* * * 

— Word ccmes from Los Angeles that twenty-five thousand feet 

of wcrms used to make whiskey were destroyed by federal agents 

in the State of California during the year last past. It is said that 

this is much more than has been found in any other state of the 

union and the federal agents are correspondingly cheerful. But 

we should like to know what has happened to the worms who exist 

in such large numbers in the ranks of the federal agents themselves. 

No better word could be found to describe the character of many 

of the prohibition officers, to whom perjury and even murder cling. 
* * * 

— Judge Samuels lets loose a man called Lord whose actions 
were of such a nature as to impress all who came in contact with 
him with the conviction of his insanity. Dr. Ball, who is the great- 
est criminal psychologist around the bay, says that he is insane and 
dangerous. Judge Samuels says that Ball's conclusions are based 
on hearsay. This insanity business is very puzzling and at the same 
time very dangerous. We don't say Judge Samuels was wrong, but 
we don't want to run into Lord. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 1, 1923 




ocierry 



BUST CUPID 

JONES-THIERBACH — The engagement of Miss Marion Foster 
Jones, daughter of Mrs. George Baker Robbins, to Mr. 
George Charles Thierbach, son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. 
Thierbach, is announced. Miss Jones has spent the most 
of her life in the East and recent years in California. She 
is related through her paternal grandmother to the Volney 
Foster family of Chicago, who have been prominent there 
for many years. The late Mrs. Nancy Foster bequeathed Fos- 
ter Hall' to the University of Chicago. On her mother's side. 
Miss Jones is a member of the well known West family of 
Virginia, established in that state by Sir Francis West in 
colonial days. She attended Rosemary Hall in Greenwich, 
Conn., for three years and since then has traveled extensive- 
ly. Mr. Thierbach served during the war as a lieutenant in the 
aviation corps in this country. He is connected with the firm 
of Jones-Thierbach. The couple following their wedding in 
October will make their home in Marin County, where the 
Thierbachs have an attractive country estate. 

VON PHUL-WEBELACKER — The engagement of Miss Alzire von 
Phul, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William von Phul, 
to Armin Webelacker of New York was announced in the 
early summer, but only rumors of it reached this coast a few 
weeks ago. .Miss Alzire von Phul is an extremely talented 
young girl and she attained some small local fame while here 
at school by the publication of a little volume, dedicated to 
her youngest sister, who was the heroine of the series of 
sketches and which was given to her personal friends in this 
city. The marriage of Miss von Phul and Mr. Webelacker will 
take place around the Christmas holidays. 

LOOP-HOBBS — The wedding of Miss Virginia Loop, daughter of 
Mrs. Frank Summer Loop, to Mr. Charles Hobbs will take 
place on Saturday, September 15, at the country home of 
Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Michaels at Atherton. It will be an out- 
of-door wedding in the lovely grounds of the Michael place. 
Miss Loop has chosen Mrs. James Lee Schlesinger as her ma- 
tron of honor. 

GLICKMAN-TOVER — On Sunday afternoon a reception was given 
by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Gliekman in honor of their daugh- 
ter, Miss Cecelia Gliekman, and Mr. Samuel Tover, who an- 
nounced their engagement. For the occasion the Ball Room 
and Pergola Court at the Hotel Richelieu were used. Re- 
freshments and dancing were enjoyed from 2 until 5 p. m., 
and in the evening at S p. m. a dinner for forty immediate 
friends and relatives was enjoyed. 

LUNCHEONS 

MENLO COUNTRY CLUB — The Menlo Park Country Club was 
especially gay last Sunday and there were many swimming 
parties in the new pool. The pool is beautifully situated near 
the club house, on higher ground. There is a magnificent 
view from the bath house and a wide canopied veranda is an 
attractive feature. Bridge and mah jongg tables were placed 
on the veranda and it now is the popular place to play the 
games. At luncheon were Mr. and Mrs. Richard Heiman, 
who greeted many of their friends after a three-months' ab- 
sence in Santa Barbara, Mr. and Mrs. Frank King, Mr. and 
.Mrs. Roger Lapham, Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick, Mr. 
and Mrs. Frank Hooper, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Hooper. Mr. 
and Mrs. Latham McMullin and Mr. and Mrs. Augustus Tay- 
lor. 

SHARON — Mrs. Frederick Sharon was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon given by Mrs. Frank Deering Monday afternoon at 
the Hotel St. Francis. Others in the party were: Mrs. James 
Athearn Folger, Mrs. George T. Marye, Mrs. Frank S. John- 
sou, Mrs. Andrew P. Welch, Mrs. William S. Porter and Mrs. 
Frederick W. McNear. 

WHIPPLE — Mr. and Mrs. Frank Whipple and their children 
will return to their home in town on September 1, after 
having spent the summer at Menlo Park. Mrs. Whipple gave 
an informal luncheon and bridge party on Friday at the Menlo 
Park Country Club. 

SHARON — Mrs. Frederick W. Sharon entertained a group of 
friends at luncheon at her Menlo Park home. 

HOTEL ST. FRANCIS — The Garden and Fable room of the Hotel 
St. Francis were crowded with small groups during the lunch- 



eon hour Monday and the loveliness of the debutantes was 
particularly striking. 

Mrs. Edward J. Pond had the Misses Florence and Marie 
Welch and Miss Adrianne Sharp in her party. 
The lovely Jane Cowl was with Mr. and Mrs. Walter Filer 
and Mr. George Garritt and was kept busy acknowledging 
greetings from her many friends and admirers. 
One of the larger groups was presided over by Mrs. William 
Mayo Newhall Jr., who had as her guests Mrs. Daniel C. 
Jackling, Mrs. Joseph O. Tobin, Mrs. George Cameron, Mrs. 
James Jackman, Mrs. Allan Lowery and Miss Helen Garritt. 
Another of the charming groups at luncheon had Mrs. Frank 
Deering as hostess and Mrs. William S. Porter, Mrs. Fred- 
erick McNear, Mrs. Frank Johnson, Mrs. A. P. Welch, Mrs. 
Frederick Sharon and Mrs. George T. Marye as guests. 
Small groups of the debutantes included Miss Edna Taylor, 
who had as her guest Miss Lawton Filer. Miss Eileen Mack- 
intosh and Miss Jane Carrigan made another charming pair. 
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Folger and their daughter, Miss Elena 
Folger, entertained a party of friends including Mrs. Daul- 
ton Mann, Mrs. Robert Miller and Mrs. Moseley Taylor. 

TEAS 

MACFARLANE — Miss Eileen Macfarlane gave a tea Monday at 
the Palace for Mrs. Glen Henry Anderson, wife of Captain 
Anderson, U. S. A., who recently arrived from New York, and 
is going to Honolulu. 

CUMMIXOS — Miss Virginia Cummings and her mother, Mrs. 
Joseph Cummings, will give a large tea at the St. Francis 
Hotel on Tuesday, September 4. There will be about 200 
guests and it will be the first formal affair given by Mrs. 
Cummings or her daughter this season. 

PATIGIAN — Mr. and Mrs. Haig Patigian gave a tea on Satur- 
day for Mr. Henry Hadley of New York, who will soon return 
to the East. 

SIBLEY — Mrs. John D. Sibley entertained on Saturday afternoon 
at a tea in honor of her mother in law, Mrs. William Sibley, 
whose ninety-fifth birthday was celebrated. Mrs. Sibley is a 
remarkable old lady and only a few months ago came from 
Des Moines, Iowa, to join her son and daughter in law and 
to make her future home with them. 

BRIDGE 

CEBRIAN — Mr. and Mrs. Louis de Laveaga Cebrian will en- 
tertain at a bridge party this Saturday evening. Guests suf- 
ficient to complete four tables of bridge have been invited. 

LAW — Mrs. Hubert Law entertained at a bridge party Monday 
afternoon at her home in Palo Alto. The guests were Mrs. 
Roy Bishop. Mrs. George Ebright, Miss Elsa Schilling, Mrs. 
Edgar Freeman, Mrs. Mervyn O'Neill, Mrs. Philip Wales, Mrs. 
■lames Howell and Mrs. H. R. Warren. Dr. and Mrs. Law 
will sail for Australia on September 21 on a four months tour 
and on their return will stop at a number of interesting 
places in the Orient. 

TYNAN — Miss Margot Tynan, daughter of Mr. Joseph J. Tynan, 
whose engagement to Mr. J. Curtis Taylor was recently an- 
nounced, will be the guest of honor at a bridge party and 
tea which Mrs. Robert Clarence Ogden will give on Wednes- 
day, September 5. 

DINNERS 

SHARP — Miss Adrianne Sharp entertained Tuesday evening in 
honor of Miss Frances Ames, whose engagement to Mr. Gor- 
don Johnson was announced this summer. About forty of 
the debutantes of Inst winter and the season before and a 
compliment of nun. ;is well as some of the younger married 
couples were present. 

FORD — Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Ford gave the second of a series 
of dinner parties Monday evening at the Burlingame Country 
Club. The affair was arranged in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Ar- 
thur Cable of Chicago, who are visiting here, and assembled 
a dozen intimate friends. On Friday evening last, Mr. and 
VIrs. Ford entertained at a similar affair, the setting for 
which was the Ford home in San Mateo. 

ST. CYR — Mr. and Mrs. Jean St. Cyr, who entertained guests 
over the week end at their home at San Mateo, were hosts 
at an enjoyable dinner on Friday evening. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

65 Bush Street, Bet. Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 

HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



September I, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



SULLIVAN — Mr. and Mrs. Celestine Sullivan entertained at a 
dinner dance in the Host- Room at the Palace the latter part 
of the week, complimenting Mr. and Mrs. James A. i 
of Washington. D. C. 

TUBBS — Miss Emelie Tubbs gave a dinner Friday evening at 
her home on Broadway. With her mother, Mrs. William B, 
Tttbbs, she is occupying the Mooney house this year. 

WELCH — Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch will entertain a large 
dinner party this Saturday evening, preceding the dance Which 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. McXear will give in honor of their 
daughters, Miss Florence and Miss Marie Welch, who will 
be introduced to society in October. The Welch dinner will 
be held at their home in San Mateo. 

FILER — Mr. and Mrs. Walter G. Filer are entertaining R. Ches- 
ley Richardson, one of the popular bachelors of New York 
society, during his brief stay here. They had a few friends 
in for dinner at their home Tuesday night as a compliment 
to him. 

FURST — On Sunday evening Mr. and Mrs. Malvyn Furst and 
their attractive daughter, Miss Bernice, were hosts at a very 
lovely dinner at the Richelieu, given in honor of Mr. A. E. 
Cohn, father of Mr. Furst who is going east to the G. A. R. 
encampment. 

STENT — Miss Frances Stent has asked some of the young peo- 
ple of society to dinner this Saturday evening at the Stent 
home in Menlo Park, and afterwards will take her guests 
to the ball which Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear will give 
for the Misses Marie and Florence Welch. 
IN TOWN AND OUT 

TAYLOR — Miss Edna Taylor, Miss Jessie Knowles and Miss Alice 
Requa returned from Europe on Saturday. Eight months ago 
they left San Francisco in company with Miss Mary Gamble, 
as chaperon, to tour the old world. Miss Gamble remained 
in the East, where she is visiting Mrs. A. A. Pennoyer, and 
later will return to Santa Barbara. 

MOORE — Mr. George Gordon Moore entertained several men 
friends over the week end at his ranch in Monterey county. 
The place was formerly the Sargent ranch and was bought 
by Mr. Moore several weeks ago. 

DEERING — Miss Francesca Deering has returned from Inverness, 
where she passed the week end as the guest of her relatives, 
Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Knight. She is now in San Rafael visit- 
ing Miss Merrill Jones, who will also be a debutante of the 
coming winter. 

HUNTINGTON — Mrs. Howard Huntington and her daughters. 
Miss Elizabeth and Miss Margaret Huntington, have come 
up from the south and they are visiting Miss Marian Hunt- 
ington at her home in Maple street. They will be here for 
several weeks. 

WEBSTER — Mrs. Walter B. Webster has returned to her apart- 
ments at the Fairmont after a three weeks' motor trip through 
the southern part of the State, as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Mendel. 

TITUS — Mr. and Mrs. Louis Titus and their children and Mrs. 
Titus' sister, Miss Therese Rooney, returned to Burlingame 
on Saturday after a stay of a week or two at the Titus ranch 
in the San Joaquin valley. The Titus family have divided 
their summer between the ranch and their home at Burlin- 
game, with the exception of several brief trips that Mr. and 
Mrs. Titus have taken East. They will leave the latter part 
of October for their home in Washington, D. C, where they 
will, as usual, pass the winter and will return to California 
for next summer. 

McNEAR — Mr. Cyril McNear entertained a congenial little coterie 
of friends over the week-end at the home of his parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. John McNear, on the Russian river. 



Harmon ®ml?t 



Vacal Ion is n\ er. Now Is 
the time to use Marmons 
Bleach and Whitening cream 
to ivnu>\ e sunburn and tan. 
Then Marmon Almond mas- 
sage cream to feed the tissue 
and recondition the skin 
sale at nil dept, stores, and 
! 13 Fillmore St. Ask for 
booklet Retain "» our Beauty. 



Madame Marie 





By A FLICKER. 



PERHAPS more than any other pleasurable entertainment in 
modern life, the moving picture industry needs the kindly 
veil of illusion to successfully carry out its plan of action. 
The ordinary school boy or girl is cognizant of the fact that a 
great number of pictures are "faked," but this faking is so clev- 
erly done at times, that we are reluctant to admit it as such, even 
to ourselves. 

There seems to be at present a tendency on the part of produc- 
ers (or shall we call it a temporary aberration?) to tell the truth 
regarding the location of the shooting of the scenes, which, taking 
into consideration the accepted standards of these gentry, puzzles 
us greatly. For instance, we were told that scenes in "The Fog," 
though indicated by the author to have taken place in some New 
England state, were shot around San Francisco Bay; and again, 
the manager of "Rin-Tin-Tin" in "Where the North Begins," in- 
formed his audience at the start that the scenes were shot in the 
Feather River country and not in Alaska. These statements, in 
our opinion, decrease the interest in the play, instead of enliven- 
ing it, and granted, even, that such an announcement is good 
advertising for the section of country in question, for the first 
time in our lives, we decry this passing phase of "telling the 
truth and nothing but the truth," on the part of movie producers, 
at least. 

* * * 

The screen rights to "Black Oxen," Gertrude Atherton's famous 
novel, have been more hotly fought over than any other book of 
the year, and have been secured by First National. The Frank 
Lloyd Productions are to have the glory of filming it, to be re- 
leased, o£ course, by First National. Harry Weil, location man for 
the company, spent several days in San Francisco last week, and 
according to present plans a considerable part of the big picture 
will be made here. 

Victor Seastrom, famous Swedish director, and the company 
engaged in the filming of Sir Hall Caiue's famous novel, "The 
Master of Man," for Goldwyn, have returned to San Francisco. 
Mr. Seastrom and the company worked near Half-Moon Bay sev- 
eral weeks ago for ten or twelve days, when the picture was first 
started. At that time Joseph Schildkraut was playing the lead, 
but after their return to the studio it was decided that he was not 
the type for the part, so Conrad Nagle was put in his place, which 
necessitated the return to San Francisco to retake all the scenes 
done here. Is it any wonder that picture making is an expensive 
game? The film will be released under the title of "The Judge 
and the Woman." 

Impressionistic settings, with lights and shadows used in an 
entirely different manner, are being designed by Cedric Gibbons, 
art director for the film version of "Three Weeks." which Alan 
Crosland is to direct. 

The settings will be entirely different from anything yet at- 
tempted for the screen. Detail, so obvious in ordinary screen 
settings, will be subordinated to an atmosphere entirely in har- 
mony with Elinor Glyn's famous story. 

Under the direction of Sophie Wachner. Goldwyn costume di- 
rector, an elaborate wardrobe is being prepared for "The Lady," 
central figure in Mme. Glyn's love story. Aileen Pringle has been 
selected for the role of "The Lady." 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street SAN FRANCISCO 

Is the most refined family hotel in the city 

— a home unsurpassed 

ELMER ML WOODBURY Manacer 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Batter S1SS Under Management CARL S. STANLET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 1, 1923 




By P. N. BER1NGER 



Taxat'on the World Over 

THERE has been an excessive taxation 
the world over to pay the expenses in- 
curred during and after the Great War. These 
taxes have been levied most heavily as a rule 
on those who participated most in the 
struggle; those nearest to Germany have 
been hit the hardest of all. Strangely enough, 
Germany has not seen fit to levy taxes on her 
people to the extent that other nations have; 
the Germans being untaxed while others pay 
for the war. Germany's taxation is only one- 
tenth as heavy as the British. In Great Britain 
nearly one-third of the wealth created is 
claimed by the tax collector. In Germany the 
proportion is only about one-thirtieth. Even 
in far Australia, the rich merchant or manu- 
facturer pays proportionately in taxation four 
or five times as much as the German does. 
Germany has practically no war debt left. 
She had no foreign debt and her heme debt 
has been extinguished by the collapse of the 
mark. In Germany's foreign trade, the per- 
petual downward rush of the mark is esti- 
mated to have COST OTHER COUNTRIES 
and SAVED TO GERMANY over four hun- 
dred million pounds, which is far more than 
Germany has paid in reparations. 



Germany Can Pay 

Germany may easily do a great deal more 
than she has been doing. Here is something 
that very few people, in this country, take 
into account. No fewer than TEN TIMES 
have the powers of Europe considered and re- 
considered this question of reparations. On 
EVERY OCCASION has France consented to 
some remission, some moratorium, seme dis- 
count on the German debt. Germany has 
plenty of assets, as the French have shown. 
The cry has been that Germany's livestock, 
was lost to her. In fact, her own statistics 
shows a vast increase in cattle, sheep and 
horses. Then consider that Germany claims 
enormous losses in coal production. Germany 
still stands at the head of the list as a coal 
producer in Europe. 



Why the Cries of Poverty? 

It can not be denied that there must be 
some suffering in Germany, but this has been 
brought about deliberately and the rich have 
been getting richer while the poor have been 
getting poorer. The production of mills 
and factories has been paid for, to the people 
of Germany, with worthless paper while the 
exporters, the manufacturers, have been get- 



ting geld for the same product abroad. Ger- 
many is in the position of a debtor who hides 
his assets, concocts his books and deliberately 
pretends to insolvency in order to defeat his 
creditors. We find the alarm at the fall of the 
German mark reflected in other European 
countries and, notably, in England. Patriot- 
ism of the kind which swayed men's hearts 
and minds during the war is dead in England, 
and we find instead a gaunt fear lest the 
French dominate Europe, in an industrial 
sense, in the future. France has a construc- 
tive program. England has nothing but a 
fearsome cry that France let go of Germany's 
throat and no program as to what should be 
done afterward. England is vociferously will- 
ing that France be ruined that a great Eng- 
lish-German trade may result from that ruin. 
France should not, and will not, consent to 
assist in her own ruin. 



The Hctch Hetchy Power 

There seems to be a great diversity of 
opinion in regard to the plan to be adopted 
as to the disposal of the power to be gen- 
erated at Hetch Hetchy. Some are in favor 
of the city going into the power selling busi- 
ness, selling "juice" to the individual or the 
plant and in favor of the establishment of 
another great department of activity, under 
city ownership. Others are in favor of selling 
the power to existing companies, who are al- 
ready in the business of furnishing power, 
and to other companies, which may be 
formed for the purpose of handling power. It 
is a most difficult question to satisfactorily 
settle and should really not be left to be han- 
dled to those who are supposed to interpret 
public opinion, as supervisors. This program, 
as to what shall be done with the generated 
power and whether the city shall go into busi- 
ness along new lines or sell the power, to 
power creating and selling agencies, should 
be solved by experts and not by the general 
public. The natural tendency seems today to 
be to get away from a public ownership of 
utilities. The reason for this is found in the 
lessons, derived in every direction, during the 
war, where government and public ownership 
of all kinds simply meant that the costs of 
these experiments, which almost invariably 
turned out flat failures, were assessed for 
payment on the general public. We have not 
yet emerged from under the heavy load, laid 
on us through government ownership or op- 
eration of every conceivable thing, and it 
will be years before the curse is taken off the 
people or the burden lessened. 



The Activity in Building 

Everywhere in California there is a tre- 
mendous building activity and the huge 
amount of money being spent in this state, 
from the Oregon line to San Diego, has never 
before been equalled in amount in the state's 
history. This is a time when every encourage- 
ment, which may be given, should be afforded 
those who may wish to build. There is a con- 
tinual building of new homes, in and around 
San Francisco, and the suburban communi- 
ties are now having the benefit of large num- 
bers of newcomers. The East is pouring its 
thousands into this state and San Francisco is 
receiving its proper quota. We should move 
in such a fashion that we may have the bene- 
fit of MORE than properly would be con- 
sidered our quota. The only way we may 
achieve this distinction is by letting the world 
know about us, whenever the opportunity 
arises to tell about ourselves. We have the 
conditions here to brag about. We have cli- 
mate, location, and finances. We are ready to 
help anyone, who comes here with a sane 
plan to establish a factory, and we are will- 
ing to help such individuals settling here as 
to their home place, but we should be MORE 
than willing to tell these prospects why capi- 
talists should build the factory and why they 
should make this city, or some of the environ- 
ing cities, their living place. The reasons are 
so obvious it is not necessary to detail them, 
to a Californian, but the great trouble is that 
the San Franciscan finds them so obvious he 
does not think it is necessary to point them 
out to the stranger within our gates. Get the 
habit, and get it quick, of telling people all 
about the marvelous city by the Golden Gate. 



Los Angeles and What It Has Done 

Los Angeles is a very large city. It remains 
a large city after you have deducted miles 
and miles of territory added to it in which 
but very few people live. It is a large city 
because it has been made so by the con- 
tinuing energy of its people in boasting. At 
first, they boasted of things they thought they 
ought to have, some boasted about things 
they had not at all; some, later on, found 
that some advantages were coming their way 
as a result of boasting and the things that 
were really did not exist, came right along, so 
that today Los Angeles has a perfect right to 
claim it is "a wonder city." And the Los 
Angeleno is entitled to a respectful attention 
when he boasts. Of course, sometimes, you 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 BuhIi Street 

Tlione Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



September I. 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



14 



check him up, and you find that he has not 
exactly told the truth but, if he keeps up that 
boast, in six months his little lie, or his large 
one, becomes an accomplished fact. 



Pr.'thh Trade Conditions 

As France has repeatedly pointed out that 
British trade conditions and the vast num- 
bers that are unemployed in Great Britain 
are really the reasons which spur Great Brit- 
ain in its savage attacks on France, on ac- 
count of the Ruhr occupation, it is a good 
thing to look at things from the internal 
British standpoint, sometimes. All news- 
papers agree that the unemployment of 
skilled labor in Britain is something perfect- 
ly overpowering to contemplate. We must 
admit, if we are disposed to be fair, that the 
France-Belgian occupation of the Ruhr and 
the paralyzing influence of the worthless 
paper mark in the rest of Germany could 
have little or nothing to do with the unem- 
ployment of skilled labor in England. 

The Bri ish Trade Review, one of the most 
important trade periodicals of the world, 
makes the remark in an editorial in the Au- 
gust issue, it is very evident that markets 
must be found within the Empire. The edi- 
torial goes on to show that Great Britain has 
never in reality recovered the markets it lost 
during the war, to the United States and 
other countries, and that it has had, since 
the armistice, to take in consideration not 
only the wonderful activity of France, Bel- 
gium, and other continental countries but of 
Germany herself. Germany has cut woeful- 
ly not only in British trade but Germany has 
supplied ships to carry her ware to the far- 
thest distances. Great Britain is therefore 
faced with two problems, at the same time. 
One is the loss of the trade she believed legi- 
timately hers, for all time to come, and the 
ether is the unemployment of her skilled men 
from loss of markets, outside the British 
realm. Is it not possible that the astute Cur- 
zon is k : ndlins: a fire in France's front yard 
to draw the British people's attention away 
from the deplorable and menacing condi- 
tions at home? There are more people sched- 
uled to leave Great Britain for other coun- 
tries today than ever before in the history 
of England and most of these are skilled 
workers. 



A Great Growth 

As an evidence of the fact that business, 
all over this state and with San Francisco 
in particular, has increased at a phenomenal 
rate this year it is only needful to state that 
travel has increased in like proportion with 
every railroad. Notably is this so as to the 
Santa Fe, whose passenger business has in- 
creased thirty-nine per cent over that of 
last year for the same period of time. The 
rail lines, since the government relinquished 
control, have not been slow in reducing their 
rates and that has made this increase in 
travel possible. The surcharge, allowed the 
Pullman people, is in a large part what has 
made this reduction in rates by the railroads 



possible, but if the surcharge privilege is re- 
moved the reduction will most probably have 
to be wiped out entirely and the encourage- 
ment to excessive travel given by the pres- 
ent rates will be removed. If the ordinary 
traveler finds it necessary to pay more for 
the privilege of traveling in a short time he 
can lay the blame for such a condition on 
those who are crying for a reduction of the 
Pullman surcharge. This cry is voiced by 
those passengers who desire more room and 
better accommodations than the ordinary 
traveler at the same price. 



CALIFORNIA 

PLATE &. WINDOW 
' GLASS * 

COM PANY. 
1477 EDDY ST' 
?AN FPANClfCO. 



PHONE. 
WEST 
38' O. 




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new work of any kind, <-ull on un and 
become our satlufled customers. All work 
guaranteed) 



Boyes Hot Springs 

45 miles from San Francisco — on the 
N. W. P. It . R. 

Beautiful Mew flolf Course 

Black Point cutoff highway now com- 
pleted 

Dancing. Mineral Baths. Hot and Cold 

Swimming Pools, Movies 

For particulars write 

R. G. LICHTENBERG. Boyes Springs, 

Or Peck-Judah, 672 Market St., 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Populnr Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Tost Street, Near Market Street 

I'll. uii' luiiniy 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Menli Served a In Carte. Alto Regular 
French and Italian Dinner* 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 



Telephone Market 64 



San Francisco 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

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Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Peck Judah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



TYPEWRITERS 

(i uaranteed Factory Rebuilt 



All Makes 



SOI. I) 
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REFAIUEI) 



See the New Remington Portable 
The Standard Keyboard Portable 

Paper — Ribbons — Carbon — Supplies 
AMERICAN WRITING MACHINE CO. 

606 Market St.. Sun Fran, rhone Donfr. 649 
308 13th St., Oakland Phone Oakland 2764 



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Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAIKANT AND 
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.") Now MontRoniery St. 

Opposite I'alace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

I ILD P< ODLE DOG. 

4ln-1D7 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A I1.8G Frenrh Dinner 

>er\e<l Unity F.xrept 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to p. in. 

Al-n A I.a Carle 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 1, 1923 



LEISURES WND 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

75m <Moon&- 



Granada— "Bluebeard's Eighth Wife." 

Gloria Swanson in a gorgeous new pic- 
ture — that means bulging walls at the Gra- 
nada all this week. The sidewalks are not 
wide enough and the lobby inadequate and 
the seats won't go around. Gloria with the 
grey-blue glance and the gowns of unspeak- 
able gTandeur! Very rapid eye-lash work 
and hectic activity in the dressingroom where 
costume changes take place, both charac- 
terize this appearance of Miss Swanson's in 
a picture that simply seethes with excite- 
ment and strained suspense. A fact it is that 
Queen Elizabeth with a wardrobe of three 
thousand dresses had nothing on Gloria. 
Nothing whatever. And how very much pret- 
tier, by the way, are the clothes of today 
than in Elizabethan days! The clothes and 
the figures that animate them are far more 
charming and graceful and artistic. With 
the stunning star in the Bluebeard picture 
are associated Huntley Gordon, handsome 
and debonnair, and a capable company of 
players. 

Paul Ash joins forces with the Anita 
Wright dancers and the result is a delight- 
ful entertainment of song, dance and melody. 
Several other musical events occur, and the 
entire program is an attractive one, well car- 
ried out. 



California— "The Silent Partner" 

The mighty movie must have a finger in 
every pie, and in the picture "The Silent 
Partner" it dips a tentative digit into the 
perilous feminist question. It is safe to as- 
sert that this film will never be comman- 
deered by the feminists for powerful propa- 
ganda. A pleasing picture, however, and 
admirably acted. Leatrice Joy has the role 
of the wife whose carefully concealed thrift 
in times of prosperity saves husband (a Wall 
Street plunger) in the dark hour when for- 
tune frowns. Owen Moore is convincing in 
his part, and Robert Edeson is more suit- 
ably cast than has been the case in several 
recent productions. In the days when this 
amiable actor was something of a personage 




on Broadway, the days of the spoken drama, 
he was fortunate in always having a part 
fitted to his personality and tending to bring 
out the agreeable qualities of his art. In 
the motion picture field he has not been so 
well cast. In fact, several of his roles have 
been quite distressing to those of us who 
remember the mellow-voiced younger Ede- 
son. 

The California program is a bright and 
varied one this week. Baby Peggy appears 
in a comedy called "Tips" and although pri- 
vately I think she ought to be home in bed, 
professionally there is only admiration for 
the child's cleverness. Setaro's orchestra, in 
a symphony concert, elicit much applause. 
Kosloff's dancers continue to be a hugely 
popular feature, and the News Film is an 
interesting one 



Orpheum — Nazimova in "Collusion" 

"When you've got a rotten law, you've 
got to beat it in a rotten way," is one of the 
lines in the playlet written by George Mid- 
dleton for Madame Nazimova as her vaude- 
ville vehicle. "Collusion" is the rotten way. 
It's rotten, all right. Nazimova's acting is 
a thing apart — it can never be assailed, but 
her choice of plays is questionable. Herbert 
Heyes is an admirable foil for the intense 
and emotional little Russian, and the scene 
is convincing, effective — and most pleasant. 

"Miss Juliet" has an entertaining act, as- 
sisted by a clever pianist, and she has won 
first place in the esteem of the Orpheum fans 
this week. Captain Seals, star, and his sup- 
porting company of a monkey and a rooster, 
make a favorable impression in their well- 
acted drama. "The Gyp" is a playlet of 
merit presented by Redmund and Wells. Irv- 
ing Fisher sings some popular songs and the 
seven Blue Demons do some remarkable ac- 
robatic stunts. 



Imperial — "Rupert of Hentzau" 

The world, we are told, has been saved 
for Democracy. Be that as it may, — the 
glamour of Royalty still surrounds our errant 
fancy and stories about Princesses and Kings 
continue to intrigue us. Anthony Hope's de- 
lightful "Zenda" yarns made wonderful 
movies, and his heroes and villains and es- 
capades and romantic touches are all brought 
out with telling force on the film. But, some- 
how or other, "Rupert of Hentzau" does not 
go with the dash and thrill that marked the 
"Prisoner of Zenda." It is accurate in de- 
tail, faithful as to plot, stirring in its action 
and tender in the love scenes, — but there 
is something lacking in the spirit of the play. 



Can it be possible that I am wrong, and 
the world has been so thoroughly saved for 
Democracy that Royalty has lost its fasci- 
nation? Say not so. Or, even more remote 
possibility, can it be that Bert Lyteil fails 
to depict "Rassendyll," and Elaine Ham- 
merstein the lovely "Flavia," as these two 
dear delightful characters of fiction live in 
our imagination? Certainly nothing better 
could be asked than Hobart Bosworth's 
"Sapt," and the wicked "Hentzau" of Lew 
Cody is a fine performance, while Bryant 
Washburn and Claire Windsor fill accept- 
ably the roles assigned to them. Marjorie 
Daw has a grateful part and plays it charm- 
ingly. 

The musical part of the Imperial program 
is uncommonly good, and as the picture is 
a long one, there is only time for a brief 
orchestral interval, an interesting strip of 
News Film, and a glimpse of some bird pic- 
tures. 



Warfield Theater 

"Trilby," famed the world over in fiction 
and drama, comes to the screen at the War- 
field Theater Saturday, September 1 , in a 
new production by Richard Walton Tully. 
This masterpiece from the pen of George Du 
Maurier is enacted for the cinema version 
by a cast including Andree Lafayette, beau- 
tiful Parisienne actress in the title role, Ed- 
mund Carewe, as Svengali, Creighton Hale 
as Little Billee, and other distinguished 
players in the various characters which are 
familiar to millions of readers of the im- 
mortal story. Andree Lafayette is described 
as the Puritan from Paris, because she is 
said to eschew such habits as smoking, keep- 
ing late hours and the use of cosmetics. She 
was selected for the role of Trilby because 
she typifies the perfection of feet and figure 
which were Trilby's chief charm. 

The usual special stage and screen attrac- 
tions will supplement "Trilby," and Lip- 
schultz has also written a musical score for 
"Trilby." 



A Fine Chorus 

An interesting fact concerning the Bo- 
hemian Club Chorus is that the beautiful 
soprano part is carried entirely by boys of 



SAM FRAHC1SCO i 



w ™yofc*\u.fc 




The Only Theatre in 

San Francisco 

Devoted Exclusively 

to the Best in 

VAUDEVILLE 



MATINEE DAILY 



September 1, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



the public schools from ten to sixteen years. 
The boys were obtained through Miss Estelle 
Carpenter, director of music of the public 
schools, at the request of Joseph Redding. 
With the consent of the superintendent. Miss 
Carpenter secured the boys, and obtained 
permission from the parents to allow the boys 
to participate in the performance of the 
Grove Play. After trying the voices, she 
placed the boys in charge of Edgar Reinhold, 
the well-known choir master, who trained 
them for the past few months. The difficult 
part covers a wide range and the voices soar 
up to the highest tones with no effort and 
the whole chorus is a wonderful production. 



Orpheum 

Nazimova is the only holdover on the pro- 
gram which starts Sunday at the Orpheum, 
which is made up of comedians of the first 
rank with many entertaining acts far above 
the average. George Le Mair and Joe Phil- 
lips will return with a new comedy vehicle 
which they call "Bananas" and judging from 
their past performances here, is sure to be 
a veritable riot of laughter. Jim Toney and 
Ann Norman also have a skit that was made 
for laughing purposes only, entitled "You 
Know What I Mean." Another well known 
stage figure who returns to San Francisco 
after an absence of several years is "Okla- 
homa" Bob Albright, in a characteristic song 
cycle. "A Friend in Need" is the title of 
the one act comedy skit by Howard Emmett 
Rogers in which Mann Holiner and Nicholas 
Joy play the leading parts. Del Chain and 
Lou Archer have joined forces and offer a 
skit which they have named "Not Now," 
Melissa Ten Eyck and Max Weily are char- 
acter dancers of repute and offer a novel 
terpsichorea act interspersed with piano and 
violin solos by Max Dolin and Frederick 
Cromweed. Les Klicks has a novelty act 
called "The Enchanted Forest" in which he 
features the boxing frogs and the magic 
tree. 



A SNOW YARN 

The following press-agent yarn is too good 
not to be repeated. It emanates from Los 
Angeles. Here's the way it goes : 

During the filming of her new serial, "The 
Timber Queen," Miss Ruth Roland and her 
company went to Northern California to 
make location scenes. It was bitterly cold. 
Miss Roland likes to select her own loca- 



Be Sure to See Your 

STATE FAIR 

SACRAMENTO, September 1 to 9 

Every moment of your visit will be 
filled with entertainment 

DAILY EXCURSIONS Via 

Sacramento Short Line 

DEPOTS: 

San Francisco — Kej Route Ferrj 
Oakland — 40th and Shatter Ave. 



tions and, with Bruce Gordon, leading man, 
started out on a snowshoe hike to inspect 
the surrounding country. When they had 
gone several miles, Miss Roland suddenly 
tripped and fell headlong into the snow. 
Gordon righted her, but her shoe seemed 
to be caught on something under the sur- 
face of the snow. After much effort, Gor- 
don cut away the thong of the snowshoe 
and pawed away several feet of snow and 
disclosed a Lincoln Highway signpost! 

It should be explained that the standard 
Lincoln Highway steel signs are affixed to 
hardwood posts standing eight feet above 
the ground. At that it could easily happen 
in winter. 



A NEW HOUSE IN BUSINESS 

H. P. Farrington is now the local repre- 
sentative of H. J. Mallen and Co., who have 
established themselves here. This house has 
just completed the financing of the Lincoln 
Mortgage Company of Los Angeles. H. J. 
Mallen and Co. are very well and favorably 
known in Los Angeles and the establishing 
of a business in San Francisco is something 
of a tribute to their business ability. The 
company is engaged, among other affairs, 
in re-organizing the Fresno Mortgage Com- 
pany into the California Bond and Mortgage 
Company. The special object which will oc- 
cupy the immediate attention of the San 
Francisco office will be the financing of the 
California-New York Steamship Company, 
organized by David J. Coleman, vice presi- 
dent of the H. J. Mallen Company. The 
new steamship company will operate seven 
fifteen knot refrigerator steam ships in in- 
tercoastal business. 



THE GREAT ADVENTURE 

Frank P. Sherman was a man well known 
and highly respected in the business world 
of the country and his passing away will be 
grieved by many. His death was entirely 
unexpected and this makes it harder to bear 
for those who knew and appreciated his many 
qualities. Mr. Sherman was a pioneer in 
the silk industry of this state and was a 
successful business man. He was a membet 
of the Masonic order. He leaves a widow 
and three children, to whom the sympathies 
of his friends and acquaintances will be given 
in abundance. 



A LOSS TO THE FINANCIAL WORLD 
Frank Drum, of the Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany, has gone to the Great Beyond. Drum 
was well liked among those who are in the 
financial world, as well as by a host of 
friends and business acquaintances. Through 
his many responsibilities, as well as by his 
connection with the Mercantile Trust Com- 
pany, he was in touch with many people and 
leaves behind him those who will sincerely 
mourn his going. He was a most construc- 
tive man and was a valuable citizen in many 
ways. He was connected with several cor- 
porations in an executive capacity. 



A BIG MAN PASSES 

George A. Moore, for years a big figure in 
the business world of San Francisco and 
California, has been called to his Maker. 
Mr. Moore was identified with many of the 
more active of San Francisco's business and 
industrial ventures and was one of the dis- 
tinct business successes. Everybody in Cali- 
fornia street and in the financial district 
knew him and with those with whom he was 
engaged in business he was a prime fav- 
orite. His son, Stanley Moore, will inherit 
the interest in various enterprises. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety 
to select from at Marsh's, who is now per- 
manently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Which Type 
Do You Prefer? 

France claims that her 
movie stars are the 
most beautiful. Do you 
agree? Here is a page 
o£ French and Ameri- 
can film favorites to 
help your decision. Is 
Huquette Duffles as 
beautiful as Dorothy 
Dalton? Is Edith Ye- 
hanne to be compared 
with Betty Compson? 
Well, whatever your 
decision, you'll like the 
page of movie stars in 
next Sunday's Rotagra- 
vure section. Another 
page you will all ap- 
preciate is 

"Skylines of 
San Francisco " — 

showing a few of San 
F r a n c i s c o's pictur- 
esque spots; a glimpse 
of her man made sky 
line and dusk at sea. 
as a ship heads out- 
ward through the 
Golden Gate. "Gowns," 
a page of up to the 
minute models, will at- 
tract the women read- 
ers, while everyone 
will enjoy "Bits of Eu- 
rope," "Far and Near" 
and the home life pic- 
tures of Magnus John- 
son, the new Senator 
from Minnesota. Bet- 
ter put in your order 
now for The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September I, 1923 



The Wisdom Column 

By AXTISTHEXES 

Why doesn't McSheehy use all these promissory campaign planks 
while he's in the Board? 



A newpaper's most remunerative period is during the course of a 
first class war; therefore — 



The San Francisco Journal is going the wrong way about it; it's 
rare that one slings mud and shows up immaculate. 



Speaking of international styles, those "open work covenants, 
openly arrived at" are net being worn this season. 



If there is one place where absolute harmony reigns it is where 
daily newspapers' advertising and editorial departments meet. 



"As the tree is bent, so shall it incline!" City to build a shooting 
gallery at Mission High School! And we prate of our efforts to pro- 
mote peace. 



San Francisco youth who killed companion is paroled. Probably, 
to his immature mind, this simply inhibits his indulging, for that 
period, in any kind of manslaughter. 



With as much propriety might an ass, because of the cross on its 
back, deem itself a church, as may some, because they profess Chris- 
tianity, claim they are followers of Christ. 



Extravagant eating begets indigestion; Franz Butner, suspected 
smuggler, swallows a mess of diamonds and lands in the dyspeptic 
ward, U. S. Marine Hospital. 



John Miller, Steubenville, Ohio, sells his family for $12.50 per 
head. Now, in his town, there are quite a few who would pay twice 
that much for John — just to get a whack at him. 



With some of our schoolgirls attiring as manikins and the lads 
sporting costly cars, quite a task confronts Schoolmaster Gwinn to 
attack the class within the class. 



Why men stay home: Some of the subjects treated of in San 
Francisco churches last Sunday: "Mah Jongg," "What Would Ford 
Do If Elected President," "Calvin Coolidge," "The Man In the 
Moon." 



A young lady appearing at one of our local theatres was adjudged 
the prettiest girl in San Francisco. Nine-tenths of her sex in the 
audience will, of course, disagree with the judges who acclaimed her 
such. 



Ever since the United States' constitution was adopted some one 
has advocated a change therein; same way with the San Francisco 
charter. Bureau of Research now hints of "city commissioner," etc. 
Might this give the bureau jobs unearthing the grafters under the 
proposed new system? 



THE PONY EXPRESS 

It is only the most natural thing in the world that the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter should boost the Pony Express celebration. There 
are but very few of the older insti'.utions and organizations left in 
San Francisco which flourished in the days of the Pony Express. 
The News Letter is one of these and that is the reason, more than 
any other, why the News Letter lives and flourishes today. It is 
part and parcel of California and especially so of San Francisco 
history. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Quality 1866--56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Iturliiicame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS. 

Estate of Michael Madden, deceased. No. 37<)33 
PeiU. Xo. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
W, J. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
Michael Madden, deceased, to the creditors of 
and all persona having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Francisco, 
or to exhibit them with the necessary vouchers 
within four (4) months after the first publica- 
tion of this notice to the said administrator, at 
his office. 858 Fhelan Building. San Francisco, 
California, which said last-named office the un- 
dersigned selects as his place of business in all 
matters connected with said estate of Michael 
Madden, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of 
Michael Madden, Deceased. 

i >a u-d, San Francisco. California, August 9, 
1 H23. 
CULLINAN & HICKKV. 

Attorneys for Administrator. 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Tnlace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rales, 35c per day ; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



An Exclusive Radio Store 

Authorized Dealers for All Standard 
Radio Equipment 

Service, Help on Construction, 
Diagrams 

Manufacturing Repairing Installation 

We are as Close to You As Your 
Phone 

MILLER-TAYLOR RADIO CO. 

C. E. MILLER H. M. TAYLOR 

1403 Bush St. San Francisco, Calif. 

(at Polk) Phone Prospect 6575 



Lighting Fixtures 
Shipman & Lauer 

1318 Polk St. Franklin 4582 

Successors to 

STIMMEL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

Electric Contractors 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTING 

Supplies — Repairs — Fixtures 

Prompt and efficient service — A trial 
will convince you 



St. Mary's 
oAcddemy 

San Leandro, California 

n 

For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Goutrh 
Telephone Park 271 



DR. 


REDMOND PAYNE 




Practice limited to 


EYE, 


EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 


Hours 


10 to 5 — By Appointment — 


Saturday 


10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 


Kemo 


veil to Suite 537 Liebes Bid*. 




177 POST STREET 




San Francisco 



Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suits Pressed l>y Hand, Only- 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



OLD HAMPSHIRE BOND 

Typewriter Tapers and Manuscript Covers 

■'Made a little better than seems necessary" 

The typewriter papers are sold in attractive and 
durable boxes containing five hundred perfect 
sheets, plain or marginal ruled. The manuscript 
covers are sold In similar boxes containing one 
hundred sheets. Order through your printer or 
stationer, or. if so desired, we will send a sam- 
ple book showing the entire line. 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1866 
37-45 First Street - - San Francisco 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 



AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
ncute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; it takes 
away ail the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL, DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 
Phone Garfleld 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



Chiropractic without the aid of drugs or 
knife corrects the cause of disease, and 
restores normal conditions, thus by nat- 
ural methods health is restored. 

DR. RICHARD F. KAESTNER 
CHIROPRACTOR 

Phone: Franklin 7690 
Hours: 10-1, 2-6 And by Appointment 

Suite 201 
4 6G Geary Street San Francisco 



THE WRITERS' BUREAU 

Has a practical system of placing manu- 
scripts for publication, which is important 
to people who write. Frank criticism and 
revision are also available. 

1 174 Phelan Building San Francisco 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Brofcer 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



VISIT 

"The 
Catacombs" 

AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 695 Douglas 4772 

Perpetual Care Fund 
On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



CYCOL 

MOTOR. Oil. 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES IS 



I 140 r.enry Street 



Tel. Franklin 36*5 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Monti Work \ pper t ui ni njj to A utomobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Uridine — Blackdmltblnr 



II. W. Culver 



M. Dal-erer 



E. John* on 




Five hundred outside 
rooms welcoming a 
flood of sunshine and 
a wealth of fresh air, 
spacious dining rooms 
and commodious lob- 
bies — ■ all attractively 
furnished — are de- 
signed for your com- 
fort. 

Excellent Cuisine 
Moderate %ates 



^sStw.C. cJurgens M (i r- «l»/ 



1 




A NEW 
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 

For 

SAN FRANCISCO AND BAY COUNTIES 

Will Go to Tress 

SEPTEMBER 5th 

Please arrange for any change you may desire in present listings 
or advertising as soon as possible and not later than September jth. 



The Pacific Telephone 
and Telegraph Company 





Established July 20, 1856 




price 10 cents $5.00 per year 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1923 



LOS ANGELES 





Past and Present: An Old Clipper Ship, the Glory of the Seas, and a Modern 

Ocean Liner 



I 



i ■>i»<|^*»»«/|/ v » ii<k vi i« i^ v hii^ 



1 Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 



WALTER W. DERR 

.105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



£ 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 
the Assets of which have never been increased 
by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
JUNE 30th, 1923 

Assets $86,255,685.28 

Deposits 82,455,685.28 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,800,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 414,917.52 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HA1GHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (*/<i) 

per cent per annum was declared, Interest compounded 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore. 



Years of experience are at your service 

No individual, no matter how capable, can make all the investigations neces- 
sary to insure the safety of his investments. He must rely on the intelligence 
and experience of some investment banker. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the purchase, sale, conversion, exchange 
or handling of all investment securities. 
Our current list of offerings will be sent you on request. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

SI 7-1 S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 
Two Wall 
street 



•'Meet me at Hotel 
Oakland." When you 
have made this date — 
whether it be a social 
or business engage- 
ment, whether it he to 
dine, to dance or just 
to chat — you may be 
assured that every- 
thing will be the best. 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $16,000,000 S15.000.000 BeserTe Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

4 8E BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



OUR service in all phases of Auto 
Livery is backed by an adequate 
organization and over forty 
years of successful experience in busi- 
ness. 

Kelley's Garage 

Established 1868 

1623-1631 PINE STREET 



ffRKLAW 

Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 

for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 70c 

Dinner, Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays.. $1.75 



fffr+Afv^i^b**-* inil w I — iJ b i — *Jk*** — *ii«» ■ — t 




EiUbllthtd July 20. 1656 



0$ FiaftKl(g|] 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




VOL. CHI. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1923 



No. 10 



E. C„ England. 
One year $5.00. 



Foreign, one 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. S82 Russ Building, Bush and Montgomery Streets, 
San Francisco, Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, 
Calif., Post Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, 

Subscription Rates Cincluding postage) : 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

NOTICE — The News Letter does not solicit fiction and will not 
be responsible for the return of any unsolicited manuscripts. 

— "What was once hospitality is now a felony," said a friend 
the other day. 

* * * 

— "You won't find genius on the bargain counter," concluded 
Dr. Gordon, after expressing his views on the cost, — and often fu- 
tility, — of "higher education." 

* * * 

— "A French scientist claims to have discovered 'cold light.' In 
this country he will find that Charles Evans Hughes has prior pat- 
ents." says the New Republic. 

•fi ¥ •£ 

— "What sort of poems do you write?" asked the fair aesthetic 
of the stalwart he-man at a recent Poetry Club gathering. "Poems!" 
snorted the he-man; 'H — 1! I build engines!" 

— "Pistols for two," would be the result, so Ina Coolbrith says, 
if California poets criticized each other's work as severely as the 
New York poets do. We should boost more in business, and exer- 
cise the right of censorship more rigidly, in the arts. 

* * * 

— The day that our beloved state was admitted into the Union 
should receive more attention than Labor Day, and be "marked 
with a white stone" by all loyal Californians. What other day could 
hold for us more significance and importance? 

— "Sunk ships and cargoes rotting at the bottom of the sea may 
not shock the eyes like the ruined villages of France and Belgium, 
but they are equally material damages caused by German aggres- 
sion, and represent equally heavy losses of national wealth." — from 
the British note to France and Belgium. 

— One of the funniest things we have heard for a long time was 
the monologue of a comedian at the Orpheum Theater the other 
night, on the European situation. His speech was a jumble of his- 
torically, geographical and politically incorrect statements; his voice 
rose in emphatic assertion and then trailed off into a mumble of 
incoherency. The whole thing was a delightful satire on the state of 
the ordinary American mind trying to understand the dark and de- 
vious ways of governments "over there." And we regret to say the 
audience in general failed to appreciate the subtlety of it. and only 
an occasional chuckle was heard. 



— Discussion on the question of the abolition of war in the Ameri- 
can press, is suggested by Coolidge. This, in itself, speaks volumes 
for the broad-mindedness of our new President. He is putting a 
great question up to the people themselves, which no other Presi- 
dent seemed to have thought them capable of threshing out. 

* * * 

— There appears to be much feeling as regards the intention of 
Eugene Debs to speak in the Civic Auditorium. It would seem to 
us that, in the face of the fact that Harding released Debs from jail, 
and this is the city in which the late President drew his last breath, 
even Debs will have the good taste to refrain from obnoxious re- 
marks anent the U. S. government. 

* * * 

— Presidents of late years (perhaps to emulate the democratic 
simplicity of Jefferson) have a fancy for posing as farmers, holding 
in their unaccustomed hands the homely implements of bucolic oc- 
cupation, and the public applauds. But when a real, honest-to-God 
farmer is elected to the Senate of the United States, to deputy a class 
which is terribly in need of representation, there is great conster- 
nation as to his mental fitness for the position. 

— "If France should go to war with England, her foreign legion 
would soon be filled," remarked a legionaire recently; "The Ameri- 
can boys who went over before would go again, to get a whack at 
England; younger American boys with a love for adventure would 
enlist; Irishmen would go in a body, and numerous Germans and 
American-born Germans would fight on the side of France, even if 
Germany remained neutral. Oh, yes, France could quickly fill up 
her foreign legion." 

— Our reputed commercialism is not of the kind that the Japan- 
ese are guilty of, when Professor Y. S. Kuno, of the department of 
Oriental languages at the State University can hold the recent dis- 
aster in his home country as of "inestimable benefit to the empire, 
and a commercial boon." Loss of hundreds of thousands of lives, 
in his estimation, is nothing compared to the great good this calam- 
ity has done towards "razing of antique buildings, which now can 
be replaced with modern improvements." For sheer commercial 

cold-heartedness, what American could beat that? 

* * * 

— Oakland has been going after the milk dealers pretty hard 
and has found that there is quite a lot of milk sold which does not 
come up to the requirements in butter fats. This milk they have 
poured down the sewers, with the result that tremendous numbers 
of rats have got the information somehow or other and have 
swarmed into the city, rats that are sleek and fine with good living. 
Now it is proposed to mix arsenic with the milk but what the effect 
of that will be is more or less problematical. The rats must have 
a special sense for milk, like a shyster lawyer for a damage suit. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 8, 1923 



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s g g gg gggggggggggggggg 




OweroigaBked and Umidlerpower 

By CHARLES F. GALLAGHER. Industrial Engineer 



~aSggggggggSgggggggSgggggggg=£S-fig=~S==j:ggggggggg5 




THERE are approximately 687 organizations of one kind or an- 
other .n the City of San Francisco. There should therefore be 
no reasonable excuse why any business man should not belong to 
some organization of some kind, be it trade, fraternal or craft or- 
ganization. 

If you ask the average business man in San Francisco what he 
belongs to, he will give you a list of ten or fifteen organizations to 
which he pays dues. There is a difference between paying dues to 
an association and being a member, assuming that the word "mem- 
ber" is used in its literal sense, and this brings us down to one 
of the fundamental peculiarities of business organizations in San 
Francisco — why a lot of business men pay dues, but rightfully 
speaking are not members. 

The first reason is very obvious. Every organization must have 
a purpose; this purpose gives rise to policies and discussion of same, 
and for a San Francisco man to enter a discussion without gather- 
ing a group of men around him and having a weekly luncheon day 
in which to meet with his fellow men in a particular trade of craft, 
would be like having dinner without dessert. 

Due to the mathematical problem of having only seven days a 
week and having twenty-five luncheons to put in seven days and 
having the capacity for only one luncheon a day, the answer to 
this particular problem brings us to our heading — are we overor- 
ganized and underpowered? 

In one of our former articles we made the assertion that San 
Francisco was too well satisfied with her accomplishments, and it is 
not in any spirit of carping criticism that we are pointing out the 
sluggishness of industrial San Francisco, but rather the realization 
that we have such tremendous possibilities here in our midst that 
are overlooked, underestimated and neglected, that a person would 
be unmindful of his duty who, seeing his job before him, fails to 
perform it. Before a man takes action he must first be told of the 
necessity for taking action. This is the basic reason for these arti- 
cles. 

Ask any man on the streets of San Francisco if he belongs to 
the Chamber of Commerce and what he thinks of it. Continue this 
performance until you have questioned three or four hundred peo- 
ple. You will find a general dissatisfaction with the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce and its activities. Let us analyze the sit- 
uation. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce is potentially one of 
the greatest in the country. It has a tremendous membership, large 
headquarters, a large group of employees. The first thing we must 
keep in mind is, what are the functions of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. Some people would have the Chamber of Commerce take the 
place of the City Government and the State Departments and em- 
brace everything that any organization could perform, while others 
would have it as an organization that sends out picture post cards 
showing the size of the fruit produced in California and stop at 
that performance. Between these two extremes there should be a 
definite point which the Chamber of Commerce should function. It 
is not denied that the Chamber of Commerce of San Francisco is 
doing and has done some excellent work. It is doing all that it 
should do, and could it do what it is doing any better? I believe 
the answer is analogous to the department store that erects a mil- 
lion dollar building, spends hundreds of thousands of dollars ad- 
vertising its wares, buys the finest merchandise in the country, in- 



stalls every modern piece of equipment available, has every kind 
of labor saving device and machinery at its disposal, splendid de- 
livery system, high grade executives and after all this has been per- 
fected, an individual walks in and asks for a piece of merchandise 
and the salesman or saleslady informs that they have not got it, 
because they are ignorant of the location of that particular stock. In 
other words, unless your point of contact is sold on the organiza- 
tion and its policies, it cannot hope to accomplish what it set out 
to perform. 

But this presupposes that that particular organization has some 
policies. San Francisco recently sent out and raised four hundred 
thousand dollars to advertise the City of San Francisco by selling 
California, and the average small merchant who has put up $200 
for this civic campaign sits in the street car and reads that many 
hundreds of families have located in Oroville and Sacramento and 
the San Joaquin Valley, largely because of the fact that he has 
spent two hundred dollars to advertise San Francisco. Indirectly, 
we presume, San Francisco will benefit eventually, but does the 
man putting up the money know it and is he sold on the idea? 

We know of a person, a member of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce, who had a tremendous large project. He made up 
two reports at a cost of about $1500, mailed one to the Los An- 
geles Chamber of Commerce, asking what they could do for him to 
establish the industry, and delivered one personally to an officer 
of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. What was the result? 
The Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce engaged the services of a 
consulting engineer, prominent in his profession. Within twenty- 
four hours this engineer made a complete report on the project and 
its possibilities, wrote the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce sug- 
gesting that they immediately form a particular committee to han- 
dle the project, enclosed a copy of the letter to the person in San 
Francisco with a letter of transmittal. This was followed by a let- 
ter from the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce within forty-eight 
hours, suggesting a method of cooperation and asking further de- 
tails, and within four days three more letters arrived laying the 
plans for an immediate handling of the industry. What happened 
to the report in San Francisco sent by a member of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce? Absolutely nothing. Two weeks 
passed. The report was not even acknowledged. The member called 
up the Chamber and asked for the person to whom he had sent the 
report, but he was out of town. Finally, desiring to get his report 
back, as it had involved a considerable amount of money in its 
preparation, he was informed that they could not even find it. Three 
days more passed, while a search was made for the elusive report, 
in whose destiny a new industry was cradled, but without result. 
Two days more passed and finally a filing clerk rang up the mem- 
ber and said they had found the report and wanted to know what 
they should do with it. The rather irritated member replied that 
if they could keep it in sight long enough, he would call for it. He 
went down personally and got his report, and was introduced to 
the department where such matters are handled. There he was 
proudly shown two very splendid reports which were being sent some 
two thousand miles away at a cost of $5000 apiece for their pre- 
paration, to induce some industry in the far away east to come and 
locate in San Francisco. "Distance certainly lendeth enchantment 
to the view." 

This incident, which is a truth and a fact, may be the exception 



September 8, 1923 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



that proves the rule, but it meant a particular industry which was 
lost to San Francisco, which would have brought thousands of dol- 
lars to the community, and could have possibly been obtained and 
located here, and the man paying his dues locally cannot be blamed 
if he could not see the logic of going far afield when projects de- 
manding attention were being neglected locally. After all, it is the 
small members that make up a chamber and it would not be a bad 
idea if we postponed our tremendous plans to tell the world about 
San Francisco long enough to get busy and sell our own commun- 
ity on what we have. Like the department store, we ought to es- 
tablish our internal contacts before we go out and sell the world. 
We lack definite programs and policies and when we do get them, 
we are prone to flutter from one to the other like a will o' the wisp, 
without definitely executing a given program before transferring 
to another. 

San Francisco has the gold in its commercial quartz. In times 
of stress, either civic or national, the real wealth of potentiality 
comes to the surface and we go over the top with a leap and a 
bound; and then we all sit down and tell each other how it was 
done, while our neighboring cities, who are not so good at hurdling, 
nevertheless keep plugging along on the theory of the hare and the 
tortoise. San Francisco a hundred years from now will be a giant 
metropolis, with bridges spanning the Golden Gate, Goat Island and 
down the lower stretches of the Bay. We will have roads twice as 
wide as any of our present roads and one way traffic on fast motor 
buses in and out of the city in all directions. Express electric trains 
will whirl the army of commuters down the Peninsula and across 
the Bay bridges. Sausalito, Belvedere and the quiet communities 
of today will be thriving cities and boroughs, even as the lands ad- 
jacent to New York are today. Two-day coast-to-coast planes will 
fly eastward and westward and San Francisco will be the New York 
of the West; who knows, perhaps the New York of America? But 
not if Los Angeles can help it! The city that gains the lead in 
supremacy will outdistance the other and it will be a difficult race 
to catch the victor, once the lead is taken. We need more effort 
and energy on fewer jobs, commercially and civically. We need 
to take one thing at a time and put it over, instead of taking ten 
things at a time and talking about them. A civic campaign to sell 
the citizens of San Francisco on what we really have in our midst 
will be just as valuable as a campaign to get the settler to move 
westward. 

After all, the one big thing that San Francisco first needs in its 
program of industrial advancement can be summed up in the phil- 
osophy and wisdom of the great philosopher whose words have come 
down to us in three syllables. They should be applied civically, com- 
mercially, industrially, as the basis for all programs, for all plans, 
for all proposed expansions. Without them, building is futile, ex- 
pansion is dangerous and advancement is uncertain. San Francisco 
and its citizens should take to heart the philosopher's words and 
put them into effect. For no city or no Chamber of Commerce 
could have a better slogan than "Know Thyself." 



LACK OF FUNDS FOR RAILWAY EXTENSIONS 

At the hearing before the joint committees recently the Bureau 
of Supervisors filed a communication, pointing out the necessity of 
giving attention to the matter of financing the railway extensions that 
have been ordered. The letter said, in part: "In our opinion, the 
extensions cannot be built and operated without providing additional 
funds. This opinion is concurred in by the City Engineer, Munici- 
pal Railway and Board of Public Works accounting officials, and, 
we believe, the Public Utilities Committee." The communication 
went on to state, "The necessities of the existing system, which must 
be met and on which initial steps have been authorized by the Su- 
pervisors, will require $498,000; the Duboce, Ocean View and Em- 



barcadero extensions, less the value of materials already purchased, 
will require an additional $823,000; equipment for the Sunset and 
Ocean View lines will require an additional $360,000; and the es- 
timated cost of a car-barn, shops and the land therefor (required 
to operate the extensions), is $750,000. These total over $2,400,- 
000; the Masonic Avenue extension, for which the ordinance has 
not yet been repealed, would require an additional $345,000. If 
the unsound course were followed of using the entire depreciation 
reserve, there would still be a shortage of over $1,100,000." 

In this connection, we are of the opinion that attention should be 
given to the unification of our several railways in San Francisco, 
before we go to the expense of building extensions which from re- 
ports, appear to be superfluous. The street railway system of our 
city is antiquated in the extreme in its present operation, and even 
if the ordinary San Franciscan endures this with equanimity, it can- 
not be expected of the stranger within our gates to accept condi- 
tions with equal good humor. Something should be done quickly 
in regard to placing the street railway systems of San Francisco under 
one control and management. 



GREAT RESORT FOR ALMADEN CANYON 

The sum of $250,000 has been pledged for a big hotel project 
for Almaden Canyon in the Santa Clara Valley. This project was 
broached at the centennial celebration of the discovery of the rich 
New Almaden mine, at Casa Grande, Almaden Canyon recently, and 
the Linnard interests are backing it. Altogether, $1,225,000 in im- 
provements will be spent. 



THE MERCURY STEAM CAR COMPANY 

This Company whose offices are in the Monadnock Bidg., will 
soon begin the erection of a building at Vallejo, for the manu- 
facture of its new Steam automobile. The City of Vallejo has con- 
tributed 1 acres of land for this new factory, and $40,000 has 
been subscribed towards the work. The Mercury Steam Car is an 
improvement on the Coats Steam Car of Columbus, Ohio. 



FLORENCE 

By Amelia Josephine Burr 
"Forse vedrai Fiorenza la mia terra 
"che fuor di se mi serra, 
"vota d'amore, e nuda di pietate." 

Look now on Florence where she lieth dead. 
What life was hers! The emptied cup of shame 
Has dropped from her cold hand, and round her head 
The immortal laurel grows like emerald flame. 
Death can not alter her. She was the same 
When her marred beauty cast its spell on them 
Whose blood is brown upon her garment's hem. 
As now, when little babblers of an hour 
Peer at her in amazement where she lies. 
Look not too long — her dead face keeps it power. 
This is the magic that held Dante fast. 
Through weary years of treading alien ways — 
This is the face that swam before his eyes 
In pitiless splendor, till they closed at last 
To open on the luminous green gaze 
Where Bice's lover found his paradise. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Tour Reservations at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter (ISO Under Management CARL S. STANLET 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



September 8, 1923 




There are those in Europe who are angry with 
We Are Not Ashamed us and contemptuous of us and say that we 

have abandoned Europe to its fate and that 
we have pu hed a